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He's also started with the longest frames (ribs?) first it looks like. Those bow frames should bang out much faster as they're all short. And yes the ship saw is awesome but so is his innovating thinking, eg trying every portable saw he has to rough out the frames. There's just so much knowledge there compared to other boat builders one watches. Each video has this major new introduction to some critically important technique that if you get wrong or don't know about would spell disaster.  Super impressive stuff. 

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10 hours ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Super impressive stuff. 

It is.  Is this normal?  I don't come across many people with such a depth of knowledge and skills and at such a young age.  

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That's a good question Southercross. Leo seems to me to be a very bright person who has decided to concentrate on a certain trade and displays the level of knowledge commensurate with his level of intelligence. This is actually not a common thing since people who are demonstrably clever in our western school system get pushed in more academic directions and generally end up doing something less hands on, and certainly not involving wooden ship construction. I often wonder if this was different in the past when social class limited educational options so bright youngsters from modest circumstances got "stuck" in the trades, often with incredibly economically successful results. Leo has also clearly had very good apprenticeships, but he's so smart and charming it's not surprise he could get on with the best boat builders in the UK. Imagine Leo as someone who was smart enough to go to medical school, went into boat  building instead, and has learned as much about wooden boats as the typical early but strong medical resident would know about medicine. His professionalism, which you might describe as how you apply your knowledge efficiently, is truly impressive though. Not only do we learn some major new concept pretty much every episode, but he's also happy to defer to other experts on things like the phase converter for the ship saw motor. 

This is all close to my heart as I operate in the worlds of engineering and physics, instrument and medical device construction, machine shops and engineering education. From this perspective, Leo demonstrates an outstanding mix of theoretical knowledge,  professional practice and hands on skill for an early career practitioner. These skills are coupled; I always say that theory comes out through your hands, but engineering education struggles to connect them. Within a four year degree it's hard to get all the theoretical training in and then get it to connect with the student's common sense. Leo is smart enough, has been taught well enough and has been around long enough that he truly has it. 

 

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@Foiling Optimist+1 to your comments.

As a small scale entrepreneur in technology and instrumentation design, I see too many of those who actually know how to make things are nearly my age. The denigration of skilled trades as being somehow less worthwhile is a sore point.

It’s a fantasy to believe we can educate some kind of technical designer elite absent a connection to the physical reality of making things. I watched my daughter’s high school drop all shop classes 15 years ago rather than modernize them, and ramp up “technology” education- mostly by teaching kids how to use Word and Excel. This is so profoundly wrong as to bring tears of frustration to this high tech entrepreneur.

Not every bright person should be behind a computer or in a cubicle.  Skilled and highly intelligent builders are where the most profound innovations are likely to come from. Leo is a hope and an inspiration.

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Great Job. Congratulations.

One thing i do not understand completely.  Since the shape of the boat got distorted over the years, and the resulting shape is not adhered to, by simply replacing the damaged wood, as it is, how is the effort any different than building her as a new boat.

From what i see, the keel, ribs, planking and all are going to be replaced anyway. So what you end up with is a boat built to her original design and not having anything significant belonging to the old boat.

where is the line drawn  between Rebuild and restoration? 

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48 minutes ago, Omer said:

Great Job. Congratulations.

One thing i do not understand completely.  Since the shape of the boat got distorted over the years, and the resulting shape is not adhered to, by simply replacing the damaged wood, as it is, how is the effort any different than building her as a new boat.

From what i see, the keel, ribs, planking and all are going to be replaced anyway. So what you end up with is a boat built to her original design and not having anything significant belonging to the old boat.

where is the line drawn  between Rebuild and restoration? 

He has addressed this a number of times in a couple of the videos, he's gotten this criticism from more than a few people. You should watch all of them because they are great, but his answer is more or less that any wooden boat of this age has had nearly all of the wood replaced at one time or another. Its like a living organism, just because all the cells of your body are replaced every 7 years or so doesnt mean it's a different body.

He originally intended to keep the original keel so he could point to that, but it had to go. He is keeping the original lead ballast keel.

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9 minutes ago, Mark Set said:

He has addressed this a number of times in a couple of the videos, he's gotten this criticism from more than a few people. You should watch all of them because they are great, but his answer is more or less that any wooden boat of this age has had nearly all of the wood replaced at one time or another. Its like a living organism, just because all the cells of your body are replaced every 7 years or so doesnt mean it's a different body.

He originally intended to keep the original keel so he could point to that, but it had to go. He is keeping the original lead ballast keel.

Hopefully some of the superstructure from the original boat will go back on.  And he did keep the lead :-) I think there is also something to be said for using the old boat as the "mold" for building the new one.  There was a guy in out fleet that had a plan of replacing all the floors and ribs, then replacing the planks once that was done.  He did the floors and vanished, which is typical of a lot of boat "restorations" as far as I can tell.

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2 hours ago, Omer said:

Great Job. Congratulations.

One thing i do not understand completely.  Since the shape of the boat got distorted over the years, and the resulting shape is not adhered to, by simply replacing the damaged wood, as it is, how is the effort any different than building her as a new boat.

From what i see, the keel, ribs, planking and all are going to be replaced anyway. So what you end up with is a boat built to her original design and not having anything significant belonging to the old boat.

where is the line drawn  between Rebuild and restoration? 

If you have to ask this question, you don't get the points of Leo's channel.

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IIRC, he said that in his NSHO, as long as there's something that looks enough like a boat that you can point at it and say "that's Tally Ho", then there's a constant lineage from when she was originally built to the restored boat. A pile of new wood and a set of lines fail that test. Good enough for me.

Requoting Slocum (which I posted above). "Now, it is a law in Lloyd's that the Jane repaired all out of the old until she is entirely new is still the Jane." Bearing in mind that he did pretty much that to Spray.

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    I met a guy down in the Islands who had come into possession of an old wooden English Cutter that was probably very close in lineage and age to Leo's boat. It had been sailed to the warm Caribbean waters after decades of life in the cool more preserving waters of the English Channel and the ravages of the toredo infested tropic waters and lack of annual hauls and maintenance had taken their tole. I'm not sure exactly how my friend came to own the boat but it was probably nearly abandoned and he may have bought it for yard fees. 

    He was a painting contractor and was fairly skilled but was by no means the skilled boatwright that Leo brought to his project and he got a few years of living aboard and 'bunny slope' cruising but it wasn't too many seasons until he had to accept the inevitable conclusion that the boats days were numbered unless he rolled up his sleeves and took some major 'restoration'. The boat had a pedigree but a full rebuild/restoration to its original glory was not within the painters skills or checkbook but he came up with the idea of hauling the boat at a cheap storage yard and 'pickling' it with strong anti rot and worm solutions (as a painter in the tropics this was his forte) and then tent the boat and let it dry out over a couple of seasons. He carefully pulled most of the fine English joinerywork interior and hardware and stored for re-installation later and worked hard to build up his 'war chest' for the project while the planks shrunk and timbers dried out. He had read of people saving old wooden boats by fiberglassing a new exoskin (Allan Vaitses method) and I mentioned my work with Bill Seamann on the more recent 'C-Flex Sheathing System' that added an elastomeric bonding compound for the critical bond between the old wood and new FG outer skin. The problem with both those was that while it works well on new construction when applied to an old wooden boat there is usually enough resident rot spores that glassing it all in only hastens the renewed rot and destruction within the new cocoon. Besides, to the painter 'That just ain't right!'

    He had found a good source of relatively plantation mahogany veneers from Guiana and bought some drums of West System and began the long arduous process of triple diagonal molding with bronze staples to fasten into the original planking to form a new underlayment for a last lamination of slightly thicker longitudinal outer planking that was spiled to match the original planking strake lines. He even milled the edges of this last layer above the boot top to mimic the look of the original caulklines and ended up with perhaps a new 5/8" thick outer hull as pretty and fair as you would ever hope to see. It would fool you if you didn't know the truth of the method. 

    Of course this took years and he had put down some temporary soles inside the empty hulk and a big bed and somehow even managed to lure pretty girls into his boatyard lair every now and then with the romantic tale of sailing off into the Caribbean sunset (if he lived that long). After the hull was primed and painted, the tarps covering the leaky laid teck decks came off and new ply/epoxy decks were laid in comparatively short order. He had it launched to save on yard fees and claimed a spot in the mangroves adjacent to the yard and began re-assembling the interior and deck houses which had been re-wooded and where needed. What was amazing was that the boat actually seemed to be going to float well above its original lines due to the added volume that the new 5/8" laminations had added to the displacement of the hull. That and the lighter stronger ply deck and all the waterlogged woodwork that was well dried out and sealed. 

    

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I was waiting for the terrible conclusion that it worked itself to pieces and sank in a storm but I'm very glad to hear that it was successful.

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I'm standing by to buy your book along with PB's.

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Great clip from Randy. When he showed that Channin/Diffenderfer board chills went up my spine. The last board I had when I left San Diego to come back east to go to college was a fine example of a Channin/Diffenderfer gun at about 7'2" which was sneered at in 1972 which was the era of stupidly short 'short boards'. That Diff was the sexiest shape I ever saw and I bought it for a song and it saved my ass many a time on big South swells that I had no business even being out in. The length and perfect rails/rocker let me survive in big conditions that were way out of my pay grade. I left it with a friend when I left and to see that it would be worth so much as a restoration made me cry. 

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36 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Great clip from Randy. When he showed that Channin/Diffenderfer board chills went up my spine. The last board I had when I left San Diego to come back east to go to college was a fine example of a Channin/Diffenderfer gun at about 7'2" which was sneered at in 1972 which was the era of stupidly short 'short boards'. That Diff was the sexiest shape I ever saw and I bought it for a song and it saved my ass many a time on big South swells that I had no business even being out in. The length and perfect rails/rocker let me survive in big conditions that were way out of my pay grade. I left it with a friend when I left and to see that it would be worth so much as a restoration made me cry. 

Cool.

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On 8/15/2018 at 1:04 PM, Foiling Optimist said:

That's a good question Southercross. Leo seems to me to be a very bright person who has decided to concentrate on a certain trade and displays the level of knowledge commensurate with his level of intelligence. This is actually not a common thing since people who are demonstrably clever in our western school system get pushed in more academic directions and generally end up doing something less hands on, and certainly not involving wooden ship construction. I often wonder if this was different in the past when social class limited educational options so bright youngsters from modest circumstances got "stuck" in the trades, often with incredibly economically successful results. Leo has also clearly had very good apprenticeships, but he's so smart and charming it's not surprise he could get on with the best boat builders in the UK. Imagine Leo as someone who was smart enough to go to medical school, went into boat  building instead, and has learned as much about wooden boats as the typical early but strong medical resident would know about medicine. His professionalism, which you might describe as how you apply your knowledge efficiently, is truly impressive though. Not only do we learn some major new concept pretty much every episode, but he's also happy to defer to other experts on things like the phase converter for the ship saw motor. 

This is all close to my heart as I operate in the worlds of engineering and physics, instrument and medical device construction, machine shops and engineering education. From this perspective, Leo demonstrates an outstanding mix of theoretical knowledge,  professional practice and hands on skill for an early career practitioner. These skills are coupled; I always say that theory comes out through your hands, but engineering education struggles to connect them. Within a four year degree it's hard to get all the theoretical training in and then get it to connect with the student's common sense. Leo is smart enough, has been taught well enough and has been around long enough that he truly has it. 

 

+1. When in graduate school I and most of my colleagues spent about 1/4 of our time in the workshop building or modifying equipment (and the rest trying to make it work in our experiments.)

As a result I could have a go at most trades, and in later life could talk to just about anyone on the factory floor about what they were doing (and find some reasons why things weren't working!) Don't know if things are like that these days...

PS    Another boatbuilder with vast knowledge and ability to get things done quickly is Eric Blake of Brooklin Boat Yard (see the Off Center Harbor vids). I'm sure there are many others (just not most of the guys in my local yard....)

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5 hours ago, southerncross said:

 

Go leo!!!  Just astonishing. Best thing on the internet. 

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When and how will the new frames get fastened to the keel I wonder.

They will keep the boat together, take all the weight of the keel and lead ballast and all the stresses imposed by hogging and sagging when at sea arent they?

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What I am really trying to say is this. Since the frames are nearly vertical to the keel, and relatively less meat is left on the side, to me it seems quite an awkward job to fasten them horizontally to the keel. 

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34 minutes ago, Presuming Ed said:

The connection between the frames and keel is made by the floors. Can be timber, bronze, wrought iron etc.

https://www.boatbuilding.xyz/building-wooden-boats/floor-timbers.html

Bronze:

image.png.8f19105a04b2e0e0f19f105fe6de44ec.png

Thanks for the explanation. But I am still not getting it. 

The frame can move in three possible directions. Vertically up and away from the keel. Side to side along the direction of the keel, and horizontally away from the keel.

looking at the picture above, I can see that the frame cannot move vertically because of the curve of  the floor fitting. It cannot move along the direction of the keel because it is somewhat notched into the keel. But there is no fastening preventing it to move horizontally away from the keel.  If the floor fitting had also  bolts going into the frame it would be easier for me to understand how it cannot seperate itself horizontally and at 90 degrees to the direction of the keel.  All I am left with are the planks pressing the frames inward to prevent that. But are the planks holding the frames or the frames holding the planks!

I imagine putting the boat on hard and filling it with water, trying to force the frames to move away from the one on the opposite side and  part from the keel. And can not visualise what are keeping them in place except for the outside planks and probably some deck beams  

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Everything gets attached to everything else. AIUI: The planks are attached to the frames. The garboards are attached to the frames and the keel. The floors are bolted to the keel and attached to the frames.

E.g. here: the strap floors are bolted to the keel and riveted to the frames and planks. The fabricated floors are bolted to the frames and keel.

Untitled.thumb.jpg.5c4c7bdf2691086e2748d6b2831a2ec8.jpg

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On my boat the floors are through bolted to the keel with long bronze rods.  They rods go from the bottom of the lead to the top of the floors. The load is spread into the hull by the floors. The main structure is that the hull is screwed to the floors and the floors are bolted through the keel.  The attachments between the floors and the frames, which are bolts running horizontally through both, are less important and I think mainly responsible for keeping the floors vertical.  I am sure every boat is different but I think it safe to say the main thing is that the weight of the lead is transferred to the floors which then are supported by the hull.  The frames hold the hull together.

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1 hour ago, Presuming Ed said:

Everything gets attached to everything else. AIUI: The planks are attached to the frames. The garboards are attached to the frames and the keel. The floors are bolted to the keel and attached to the frames.

E.g. here: the strap floors are bolted to the keel and riveted to the frames and planks. The fabricated floors are bolted to the frames and keel.

Untitled.thumb.jpg.5c4c7bdf2691086e2748d6b2831a2ec8.jpg

Yess... I have no problem with that. but the earlier picture you sent had no floors bolted to the frames. The floor fittings did not have any means of holding the frames except the curve preventing the keel dropping off.  There I got confused.

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"Let's buy a old wood boat and restore it that sounds like a good idea!!"  Said no one EVER who has done it before......................

Great work and great documentation. Still don't get the the gofundme millennial approach but whatever work's for you.  It's worthy noting the PNW is full of talented kids like this.  Some great shipwrights from SF to BC. they don't all have web sites though.

The sad part is the ridiculous cost of doing any real water front work like he is doing. More than likely why he is in Squeim instead of PT where he is in walking distance of any resource he could need.

 

Cool project

 

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51 minutes ago, Omer said:

Yess... I have no problem with that. but the earlier picture you sent had no floors bolted to the frames. The floor fittings did not have any means of holding the frames except the curve preventing the keel dropping off.  There I got confused.

I really don't think the bolts between the frames and the floors are what is holding the frames to the keel.  The planks are bolted to the frames and the planks are bolted to the floors. That is the connection.  And of course, the weight of the keel transferred to the floors is pressing down on the planks so even the bolts through the planks to the floors are not all that important load wise.  Any load on those horizontal bolts through the frames and the floors would just split open the frames. Like I said, I think those bolts just keep the floors from getting bent by loads like people stepping on them or kicking them. It is all a system.

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I'm not a shipright so feel free to correct.  From a layman's perspective floors on a carvel planked boat can be defined as the structural component that ties the keel to the hull.  The type and design will very greatly depending on the type of boat.  A more yachty boat where weight and speed are the goal will usually be built with steam bent or laminated frames of a lighter construction and with just the right thickness of planking.  Metal floors attaching to the planking and possibly frames, think late evolution carvel construction pushing each element to it's limit while working together to get the lightest strongest boat possible.  Less refined or more work boat style construction will be saw frames and wood floor of a much larger scantling, providing the bulk of the structure and not relying as much on the planking.  The are a couple good websites of Bristol channel cutter new builds, one in India and one in the south island of New Zealand showing the latter, also Carlotta a BC restoration.

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Blue boat near saw is a Star yes?   Can’t see the keel easily enough but the bow does have Star lines.   Nice blue too.  

Watching the ‘trimmer’ play the bevel angles on the ship’s saw makes that century old piece just come alive.   Cool.

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Must be incredibly satisfying when the frame squeezes into the notch of the keel timber.  Guess that's why they call it boat porn.

With the port side planks so far off it's understandable why he put so much effort into detailing the lofting.

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 I did an old wooden Matthews 38 Express rebuild in the Yucatan, Mexico where they still built heavy plank on frame shrimp trawlers in the old school fashion. The yard had one of those old Ship's Saws much the same as the one in the video and I soon could see that it hadn't been used in years as the local Mayan boatwrights were using the biggest circular saws you ever ran across to do the multiple plunge buts you see Leo doing for his roughout cuts on the frames. They would erect the frames oversize and then would 'dub off' the running bevels using adzes and then hand planes. I asked why they didn't use the ships saw (bandsaw) and they just shrugged and said 'no sirve..' as in 'doesn't work'. Yard manager said it was too hard to get blades these days and they had some gruesome accidents using it. I took some PN Blaster '(hafla en toto' in Spanish) and got everything loosened up and rolling or spinning or whatever it was supposed to do and it did still have a blade on it but they wouldn't let me turn it on. The wiring to it had been cut years ago but I was in love with that big hunk of iron and bearings. I seriously thought about trying to buy it and ship back to New Orleans and wish I had fourty years later. Probably the same model as Leo's. 

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On 8/15/2018 at 12:40 PM, Rasputin22 said:

    I met a guy down in the Islands who had come into possession of an old wooden English Cutter that was probably very close in lineage and age to Leo's boat. It had been sailed to the warm Caribbean waters after decades of life in the cool more preserving waters of the English Channel and the ravages of the toredo infested tropic waters and lack of annual hauls and maintenance had taken their tole. I'm not sure exactly how my friend came to own the boat but it was probably nearly abandoned and he may have bought it for yard fees. 

    He was a painting contractor and was fairly skilled but was by no means the skilled boatwright that Leo brought to his project and he got a few years of living aboard and 'bunny slope' cruising but it wasn't too many seasons until he had to accept the inevitable conclusion that the boats days were numbered unless he rolled up his sleeves and took some major 'restoration'. The boat had a pedigree but a full rebuild/restoration to its original glory was not within the painters skills or checkbook but he came up with the idea of hauling the boat at a cheap storage yard and 'pickling' it with strong anti rot and worm solutions (as a painter in the tropics this was his forte) and then tent the boat and let it dry out over a couple of seasons. He carefully pulled most of the fine English joinerywork interior and hardware and stored for re-installation later and worked hard to build up his 'war chest' for the project while the planks shrunk and timbers dried out. He had read of people saving old wooden boats by fiberglassing a new exoskin (Allan Vaitses method) and I mentioned my work with Bill Seamann on the more recent 'C-Flex Sheathing System' that added an elastomeric bonding compound for the critical bond between the old wood and new FG outer skin. The problem with both those was that while it works well on new construction when applied to an old wooden boat there is usually enough resident rot spores that glassing it all in only hastens the renewed rot and destruction within the new cocoon. Besides, to the painter 'That just ain't right!'

    He had found a good source of relatively plantation mahogany veneers from Guiana and bought some drums of West System and began the long arduous process of triple diagonal molding with bronze staples to fasten into the original planking to form a new underlayment for a last lamination of slightly thicker longitudinal outer planking that was spiled to match the original planking strake lines. He even milled the edges of this last layer above the boot top to mimic the look of the original caulklines and ended up with perhaps a new 5/8" thick outer hull as pretty and fair as you would ever hope to see. It would fool you if you didn't know the truth of the method. 

    Of course this took years and he had put down some temporary soles inside the empty hulk and a big bed and somehow even managed to lure pretty girls into his boatyard lair every now and then with the romantic tale of sailing off into the Caribbean sunset (if he lived that long). After the hull was primed and painted, the tarps covering the leaky laid teck decks came off and new ply/epoxy decks were laid in comparatively short order. He had it launched to save on yard fees and claimed a spot in the mangroves adjacent to the yard and began re-assembling the interior and deck houses which had been re-wooded and where needed. What was amazing was that the boat actually seemed to be going to float well above its original lines due to the added volume that the new 5/8" laminations had added to the displacement of the hull. That and the lighter stronger ply deck and all the waterlogged woodwork that was well dried out and sealed. 

    

Was this Tim Carr and CURLEW? Sure sounds like it could be. 

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Very nice surfacing jig. Gotta make sure that they turn the screws the same to keep it level.   Wonder if the recap, and extra video was because of all the extra traffic the front page generated. 

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6 hours ago, Uli Kunkel said:

Very nice surfacing jig. Gotta make sure that they turn the screws the same to keep it level.   Wonder if the recap, and extra video was because of all the extra traffic the front page generated. 

I would have made that  jig out of metal and was surprised that the wood jig was stiff enough.

That episode also  gives you an idea of how big a task this monumental project is !

 

A

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On 8/27/2018 at 2:55 PM, Rasputin22 said:

Those names ring a bell. Tell me more. The guy I knew was Art the Painter. 

Tim and Pauline Carr have a 28' Falmouth quay punt, Curlew, over 100 years old now. They famously restored it by cold molding a wooden skin over the old girl. Eventually they took Curlew around the world and wound up as curators of the whaling museum on South Georgia Island. Much has been written by and about them over the years. 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/sports/1999/04/13/around-the-world-without-leaving-home/7080c67f-8bb3-4608-bc51-f4b70be9437f/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.b8d08029d32c

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On 8/15/2018 at 5:40 PM, Rasputin22 said:

    I met a guy down in the Islands who had come into possession of an old wooden English Cutter that was probably very close in lineage and age to Leo's boat. It had been sailed to the warm Caribbean waters after decades of life in the cool more preserving waters of the English Channel and the ravages of the toredo infested tropic waters and lack of annual hauls and maintenance had taken their tole. I'm not sure exactly how my friend came to own the boat but it was probably nearly abandoned and he may have bought it for yard fees. 

    He was a painting contractor and was fairly skilled but was by no means the skilled boatwright that Leo brought to his project and he got a few years of living aboard and 'bunny slope' cruising but it wasn't too many seasons until he had to accept the inevitable conclusion that the boats days were numbered unless he rolled up his sleeves and took some major 'restoration'. The boat had a pedigree but a full rebuild/restoration to its original glory was not within the painters skills or checkbook but he came up with the idea of hauling the boat at a cheap storage yard and 'pickling' it with strong anti rot and worm solutions (as a painter in the tropics this was his forte) and then tent the boat and let it dry out over a couple of seasons. He carefully pulled most of the fine English joinerywork interior and hardware and stored for re-installation later and worked hard to build up his 'war chest' for the project while the planks shrunk and timbers dried out. He had read of people saving old wooden boats by fiberglassing a new exoskin (Allan Vaitses method) and I mentioned my work with Bill Seamann on the more recent 'C-Flex Sheathing System' that added an elastomeric bonding compound for the critical bond between the old wood and new FG outer skin. The problem with both those was that while it works well on new construction when applied to an old wooden boat there is usually enough resident rot spores that glassing it all in only hastens the renewed rot and destruction within the new cocoon. Besides, to the painter 'That just ain't right!'

    He had found a good source of relatively plantation mahogany veneers from Guiana and bought some drums of West System and began the long arduous process of triple diagonal molding with bronze staples to fasten into the original planking to form a new underlayment for a last lamination of slightly thicker longitudinal outer planking that was spiled to match the original planking strake lines. He even milled the edges of this last layer above the boot top to mimic the look of the original caulklines and ended up with perhaps a new 5/8" thick outer hull as pretty and fair as you would ever hope to see. It would fool you if you didn't know the truth of the method. 

    Of course this took years and he had put down some temporary soles inside the empty hulk and a big bed and somehow even managed to lure pretty girls into his boatyard lair every now and then with the romantic tale of sailing off into the Caribbean sunset (if he lived that long). After the hull was primed and painted, the tarps covering the leaky laid teck decks came off and new ply/epoxy decks were laid in comparatively short order. He had it launched to save on yard fees and claimed a spot in the mangroves adjacent to the yard and began re-assembling the interior and deck houses which had been re-wooded and where needed. What was amazing was that the boat actually seemed to be going to float well above its original lines due to the added volume that the new 5/8" laminations had added to the displacement of the hull. That and the lighter stronger ply deck and all the waterlogged woodwork that was well dried out and sealed. 

    

I think Curlew too floated higher afterwards. 

It’s a bit hard to believe but sheathing old wooden boats in ferrocement was popular and apparently fairly successful back when. 

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5 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I think Curlew too floated higher afterwards. 

It’s a bit hard to believe but sheathing old wooden boats in ferrocement was popular and apparently fairly successful back when. 

 

There's an old classic Yawl in the Harbor here. that supposedly won the Bermuda race in like 1938.  It was professionally skinned in fiberglass many years ago, due to rot in the hull.  Don't see it leave the mooring that often, but it seems very ship shape at a cursory glance.  Not sure, but I think it might be a McCurdy and Rhodes design?

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Going to be a few months of "We put some more frames in" videos. Will be interesting to see if he can speed it up some. Still pretty cool. Wonder how winter will affect things. 

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7 minutes ago, Uli Kunkel said:

Going to be a few months of "We put some more frames in" videos. Will be interesting to see if he can speed it up some. Still pretty cool. Wonder how winter will affect things. 

There will be snow.

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Sounds like he's bugged out to England for a couple of weeks. That puts him back in late September/early October. He's got ~40 pairs of frames to do. Assuming he's got helping hands, I'll be he's done with the "we put some more frames in" work by November. 

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I like how he's rebuilding to the original plans and yet is diverging from the original build by removing the iron floors and replacing with wood. Tally Ho was a composite boat in that regard as she had some iron in her original structure. His use of live oak and the tree nail (sic) fasteners are examples of his dedication to traditional materials built with a mix of modern and traditional tools. Its also fascinating to see the input of other guest workers on the various jigs and tables. Not to mention the evolution of the ship saw. 

His shout outs to other Youtubers is cool in his last video. Some good suggestions are made. I binged on Tips from A Shipwright over the past months after navigating the rabbit hole of traditional boat building content available online. The skiff and dory episodes are tremendous.

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6 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

There will be snow.

At least according to the tourist brochures and local real estate agents, Sequim exists in a state of perpetual sunshine and balmy breezes while the rest of us in Puget Sound slog through endless rain and gray. 

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wow...refurbishing a mostly idled 79' S2 11.0a (I just bought this fall) to original sailing and comfort form...and re-coring the deck and mast step on my 81' 9.2a (this spring) seems much less daunting now..

 

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