Halcyon Yachts

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Quite possible, but I think he'll take care of the hull, get the masts and rigging in decent shape, then sail her home to Cornwall to finish up.

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36 minutes ago, IStream said:

Quite possible, but I think he'll take care of the hull, get the masts and rigging in decent shape, then sail her home to Cornwall to finish up.

He has so much if the boat that he plans on reusing sitting there in Was that I can't see how he can do that.

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

Quite possible, but I think he'll take care of the hull, get the masts and rigging in decent shape, then sail her home to Cornwall to finish up.

Yes but how much will it cost to put her on a truck to the right coast first? Unless he plans an extended cruise around Panama...

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15 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Yes but how much will it cost to put her on a truck to the right coast first? Unless he plans an extended cruise around Panama...

In one of his videos he was musing about Cape Horn or the North West Passage...

You can bet the boat will be ship-shape before he leaves the US

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6 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Yes but how much will it cost to put her on a truck to the right coast first? Unless he plans an extended cruise around Panama...

A boat that size would probably require permits the entire way. She is 12 feet wide so would require two lanes.  Very expensive I would guess.  Better to put it on a ship imho. But I agree, I think it will either be in mint condition before it leaves WA, or he gives up.

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There must be some larger reason to do the work here instead of England, or to do this boat here instead of another boat there, as there are many worthy boats. And they aren't like orphaned nephews where you just have to keep them so it's a concious choice to work here. It's a long way from home to randomly drop into such a project. He's in a good place to stay focused though. Close enough to Port Townsend to access the odd resource and far enough not to get bogged down in the social whirl of PT boat building (as I imagine it). 

Does anyone have a basis to speculate on how much time you'd expect an interior to take vs. a hull?  I was just looking up length vs displacement (and I suppose, cost) and am always daunted by cubic relationships. 

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Freda is 32 feet and built in 1885.  Restored by Spaulding Boat Works using their student's labor it still cost $500,000 and took 5 years.  Tally Ho is newer and larger at 48 feet according to Wikipedia.  That would scale her as 3.4 times larger by volume.  If everything scales, it will take 17 years and about $2,000,000.

Leo has 30 videos up and gets revenue from Google for those  The web says you earn $2000 per million viewers and he has 30 videos up and they seem to be about 200k views each so roughly 6 million views or $12,000 from ads.  That might cover 10% of his costs. I have a couple of videos in the same order of magnitude and those numbers seem believable. I assume his donors are much more important.

 

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1 hour ago, Foiling Optimist said:

There must be some larger reason to do the work here instead of England, or to do this boat here instead of another boat there, as there are many worthy boats. And they aren't like orphaned nephews where you just have to keep them so it's a concious choice to work here. It's a long way from home to randomly drop into such a project. He's in a good place to stay focused though. Close enough to Port Townsend to access the odd resource and far enough not to get bogged down in the social whirl of PT boat building (as I imagine it). 

Does anyone have a basis to speculate on how much time you'd expect an interior to take vs. a hull?  I was just looking up length vs displacement (and I suppose, cost) and am always daunted by cubic relationships. 

I believe the larger reason is that the boat was already on the West Coast and he had friends with land and a shop in Sequim.

Even if the project takes 10 years of full time labor, by the 80/20 rule, he ought to have the seaworthiness up to snuff in far less time. He can then take her back on her own bottom and spend the rest of his adult life fettling with her when he's not chasing his and Cecca's offspring around.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I believe the larger reason is that the boat was already on the West Coast and he had friends with land and a shop in Sequim.

Even if the project takes 10 years of full time labor, by the 80/20 rule, he ought to have the seaworthiness up to snuff in far less time. He can then take her back on her own bottom and spend the rest of his adult life fettling with her when he's not chasing his and Cecca's offspring around.

Yep I think access to workshop big enough to loft the whole boat plus an enviable array of tools would be a big swing factor. Also, I am not a lawyer but I suspect building that boat shed structure in the U.K. would make you unpopular with your local planning department. 

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12 hours ago, casc27 said:

My guess is Leo will be at this for a decade or so (if he can keep going, and I hope he can). But he seems to be having fun and doing good work so I hope he enjoys the adventure.

I agree.  I estimated 10 years at least.   Obviously, more bodies, faster turn around.

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Dennis Holland took up a lot of space around these parts for many years.  When he finally took 'Shawnee' down I felt terrible.  You went down Holiday Road to see the barn and the boat.   The barn's still there, 'Shawnee' dismantled but stored, and 'Pilgrim'  (now called Spirit of Dana Point) sails out of Dana Point. 

https://theenterprisereport.typepad.com/newport/2011/01/sailing-into-a-storm-dennis-holland-and-the-shawnee-you-can-fight-city-hall-and-sometimes-you-should.html

Image result for dennis holland shawnee

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My thought was he made a decision to take on Tally Ho, which meant staying in Washington as opposed to finding a different project in the UK, where I am sure there are many worthy craft in need of attention. It's not like he had to do Tally Ho per se, but anyway here we are and it is awesome, albeit terrifying in scale. At least this way he might still be working on it when my kid is out of high school and I'd have more time to go down and volunteer for a while! 

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On 1/7/2019 at 12:38 PM, casc27 said:

My guess is Leo will be at this for a decade or so (if he can keep going, and I hope he can). But he seems to be having fun and doing good work so I hope he enjoys the adventure.

As EB White put it, “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” 

On the other hand I know lots of folks who would rather work on boats than sail them. I am not one of those people. 

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On 1/9/2019 at 7:43 AM, AJ Oliver said:

As EB White put it, “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” 

Kenneth Graham - "Wind in the Willows", other side of the pond, not EB White (although a keen sailor, father of Joel).

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Thanks for the correction - point well taken !

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Doug in rare form on this episode.  Visit from ace mechanical pro Chris with great chops and hip tools.

 

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2 hours ago, blunderfull said:

Good stuff. I don't buy into the "German engineering is superior" myth in general but these are the real deal.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Good stuff. I don't buy into the "German engineering is superior" myth in general but these are the real deal.

How do they last around salt water?

I would dig having some ‘Cobra’ pliers. However, I work around pools/boats & my gear gets thrashed fast.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knipex

 

They have their own Tool Museum.  Founded 1882.

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I rub some No-Ox-Id Special A on mine and they hold up fine.

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Saab cars had a pair of 10" knipex without the rubberized handles in the tool kit back in the 80s-90s. I have about 20 sets of them pinched from junk cars at work.

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Latest episode has some cool scenes, including the making of this full size pattern for the stern post:

51403757_1128197657353787_3723937504072564736_n.thumb.jpg.d81c71256c953df9675a11cca4c009ee.jpg

Quote
42. Cutting the Stern Post – and some BIG plans!

This episode, while the team keeps on building new frames, I make the templates for the Stern part of the Centerline, from the lofting floor. The ShipSaw gets some love and affection, and the framing of the centre-section of the boat is completed! Kirt and I talk about his really exciting idea about speeding up the next phase of the project, and despite a snowstorm, I make the first few cuts on the Sternpost timber with the Chainsaw Jig.

 

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5 hours ago, overdraft said:

OK, now by a show of hands, how many of you have an internet crush on Cecca?

You’re heading into Rick Springfield territory...

 

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Looks like Leo is learning a lot about project management. He obviously has great skills as a tradesman, but can he effectively train and organize a large workforce? With the skills he is gaining on this boat he will be in demand for projects down the road.

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7 minutes ago, Mizzmo said:

Looks like Leo is learning a lot about project management. He obviously has great skills as a tradesman, but can he effectively train and organize a large workforce? With the skills he is gaining on this boat he will be in demand for projects down the road.

 

One of our good mates is a highly skilled Shipwright, who is in high demand.  One of the local Brewers, now Safe Harbor yards, hires him for complicated modifications or build projects of their affluent boat owners.  I am sure they mark up his rate considerably, but I can think of only a small handful others in the area capable of his work quality.

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