Halcyon Yachts

A big project!

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Homestretch on the framing and since the films are a week or two behind reality, they may actually have popped the champagne already. 

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On 7/23/2019 at 3:49 PM, longy said:

Purple heart wood is toxic at some level. Research before you indulge.

I can attest to that!

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EPISODE 55. Tally Ho is fully re-framed! In this episode we see the final part of the frame-raising party, as we make and install the last of the frames that make up the bow of the boat. We also work on the Fashion Pieces, and take some time to do some local sailing. Finally, a container-full of really long timber arrives from Suriname, and we have to figure out the logistics of moving it around.

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Loved his call about looking forward to picking up tools quietly on his own, rather than managing people. He’s smart enough to know when to have a team, and looks like he manages them brilliantly, but his heart remains the craftsman.

Exceptional fellow.

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What a thing of beauty that last, lingering shot is. Justified pride in a job well done!

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No Wana jokes?   C’mon guys!

Wana see some?   Ck the Y’tube comments.

$25k for that container.   Forgot the price of the Live Oak - $18k??   Scaling up to a million $$$ + project.   Yikes, keep those Patreon gifts and Y’tube ad revenue coming.    

Jannelle, the new vanlife ‘star’,  reportedly pulling in from Y’Tube ads a cool $27k/month. 

Ad revenue numbers:

https://socialblade.com/youtube/channel/UCaXEr4t_QBZBk3qlIlc2HRg

Things are really different now if you can not only build something cool but, also film and edit to a high level for big brand impact.   Amazing to watch these people pull their dreams off with help from their friends.

Go Leo!

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I am amazed at the pace this is going.

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It's a pleasure to watch Leo work. I really like his attitude to safety and PPE equipment which somewhat mirrors mine, wear what is appropriate, dont burden yourself with all the gear on all the time. Having said that, Leo looks like he is a huge proponent of self responsibility which is the other half of choosing what gear to wear and when. Huge respect. 

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Stu & his Dad stop out in Western Mass to ck out Arabella.  Good stuff here.   Next stop: Tulsa, OK with Doug & SV Seeker.

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Who knew a "cutwater" was to, cut the water?  :D

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It is so refreshing to see some honesty about undertaking critical cuts. It was palpable that the moment when he starts up that chainsaw to make the cutwater was with considerable anxiety.

You consider how much time and effort has gone into making those timbers and the responsibility of making sure that you measure twice and cut once makes this high stakes tool use. Big Chainsaws are unwieldly at the best of times - the apparent ease and effortless nature is not just slick editing. Real craftmanship.  I have been tasked with cutting big pieces of expensive timber in my time - but not like this. Big ups Leo, you earned a beer there my boy. As for Pancho, surely this bird deserves to be at next years emmys as a winner?

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All the frames are new as is the keel and bow and stern timbers. I had thought he was going to reuse the planks but seems that his success as a youtuber has him buying wood for the planks and he is discussing what wood to buy for the deck beams. The lead is original though. I wonder if any other bits of the original boat will be useful. Someone said would it would be better to just build a new boat from scratch rather than calling it a restoration. The truth is that it would be easier to buy a fiberglass boat.  Anybody who wants to build, restore, or even own a wood boat is crazy. It is just a matter of degree as to how crazy they are. Leo is pretty much out there on the crazy scale. Probably a bit further out that I am. I just spent a couple weeks with a router and west system repairing the splits in my hull from the last year. 40 mahogany splines, most short. I missed the second series of races this year because I cut my finger nearly in half with my table say but won all 5 of the races in the 3rd series so life is good. Still crazy after all these years, just not as crazy or skilled as Leo.

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Reckon Leo could fall back on his chainsaw skills if the boat restoration thing doesn’t work out.

06482C45-AB2C-4941-9D5E-252D55823FD2.jpeg

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Astonishing level of craftsmanship in the cutwater. This guy can do anything. My question:  After watching all the videos, I wonder how much of what we see replicates what the original build was like.  Difficult  to imagine this level of craft and precession going into the original boat.  How large would the original crew be?  How long did it take to build it? 

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My boat was not built with that precision. I talked to Buzz when he was measuring Papoose for my new mast. The opening in my cabin top was off to one side by an inch which I considered a huge problem and have since corrected. Buzz said most boats are off and many by several inches. Mine is wood and Buzz was talking mostly about glass boats but still. I also have a friend who grew up hanging out in the boat yard his dad worked in. He said a lot of the cutting was done by eye and thus the length of the finished boats would be different one to the next. But the work that Steve does on my boat mirrors the precision that Leo is showing.

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I enjoyed the video but I did wonder why he was doing the cutwater now.

As far as I can see, it's only decorative, and cutting it now means that there's a risk of bashing it with, for example, a forklift truck over the next two years.

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58 minutes ago, Snowden said:

I enjoyed the video but I did wonder why he was doing the cutwater now.

As far as I can see, it's only decorative, and cutting it now means that there's a risk of bashing it with, for example, a forklift truck over the next two years.

i believe he explained it - so that its easier to join (missing the boat builder speak) the planking into the stem

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That's what I recall. He wanted to get the forward edge of the cutwater shaped to facilitate the cutting of the rabbet for the planks.

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Doug showing off.  

My head hurts sometimes with his detailed life.  

Hive Mind.
 

 

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At the risk of repeating myself:  "Anybody that owns a wood boat is either crazy or in love and it really helps to be both". This video is evidence. So is my boat. Someone just today asked when all the wood in my boat will have been replaced. Never is the answer but a lot has. I think the answer to Leo's riddle is that typically boats have bits replaced a little at a time and nobody would question if it is the same boat. Leo is doing it all at once but as he sort of points out he is also not. He is replacing frames against some of the original planking. And as one new piece goes in, some new old piece comes out. It maintains its identity through every step of the project so it is the same boat. Is it a wise thing to do? See the quote above. 

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4 hours ago, allene222 said:

At the risk of repeating myself:  "Anybody that owns a wood boat is either crazy or in love and it really helps to be both". This video is evidence. So is my boat. Someone just today asked when all the wood in my boat will have been replaced. Never is the answer but a lot has. I think the answer to Leo's riddle is that typically boats have bits replaced a little at a time and nobody would question if it is the same boat. Leo is doing it all at once but as he sort of points out he is also not. He is replacing frames against some of the original planking. And as one new piece goes in, some new old piece comes out. It maintains its identity through every step of the project so it is the same boat. Is it a wise thing to do? See the quote above. 

It's odd to see people question the 'identity' of wooden boats getting refits   I would bet that much of Paul Revere's house & many more Colonial era wood structures around Boston, Concord and Lexington have been refitted many times in the last century without much of a fuss from those who run the Preservation Societies.   Wood rots - end game.

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It's my grandfather's axe. The handle has been replaced 15 times and the head twice. But it's still my grandfather's axe.

Whatever about the "old" boat being rebuilt but by bit and still retaining its identity as the Ship of Theseus, I liked Leo's notion that when, as eventually happens, all the old bits accumulate to one side, you can rebuild them into another Ship of Theseus.

Thus Theseus thrives.

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Wow.  Why should I not be so impressed with the progress and approach Leo is making after watching post #530 video? They have a crew of thousands and are only half way toward where Leo is in more time. Please excuse my exaggeration (lying) as I have only learned how to do it in the last 3 years.

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1 hour ago, allene222 said:

Wow.  Why should I not be so impressed with the progress and approach Leo is making after watching post #530 video? They have a crew of thousands and are only half way toward where Leo is in more time. Please excuse my exaggeration (lying) as I have only learned how to do it in the last 3 years.

Sail Cargo is much more than the ship.  Local boatbuilding school, tree nursery, etc.   They have a really impressive community growing there.

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Blunderfull--

 Why not start another thread about your particular interest?

Leave the "A Big project" to Leo and his followers. Please.

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