MultiThom

SeaRail 19 Owners Blog/Vlog

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Well, I still haven't sailed the boat, yet.  I did modify the provided mainsail by cutting off the excess reinforcements along the luff rope.  Took me a couple hours.  But it now will go up the mast track easily.  I expect the replacement mainsail in a few days.  But until then, I do have a sail that will work if there is ever any wind (October winds are generally light in SF Bay area).

The 3000 mile journey to get the boat was not uneventful.  IN Kansas, the winds were 30kts from the side so trailering was difficult.  In Wyoming there was thick fog, rain and snow all the way to Salt Lake city.

Now back in the Bay I have launched and unfolded.  Boat is sweet.  Didn't sail, though BECAUSE my outboard isn't working reliably.  I have a Honda 2.3 that is now 2 years old.  It is short shaft and it barely has the prop in the water when I am sitting in the stern...That's OK but it isn't running reliably...I did an oil change but I think I overfilled and a wet sump can cause carb problems if you overfill. 

Boat has a huge amount of rake and a very long centerboard.  I expect it to point very well for a trimaran.  I love the self tacking jib.  I love the under traveler tiller (no more tossing the tiller extension around the mainsheet). 

Some stuff I think I'll have to work on:

  • Attaching the bowsprit and spin requires partially launching since the sprit is so long it would hit the truck if you didn't do that.
  • Unfolding requires you to loosen the shrouds...folding requires you to loosen the shrouds.  That is, the shrouds are played with a bunch.  I'll probably get used to that; but right now it is a source of trepidation.  I've been dismasted 3 times already...don't want to do it again.
  • Unfolding was difficult.  You have to help the amas out by stepping on the folding mechanism.  Similarly for folding...I expect some of this will abate after some practice.
  • The 8 bolts to secure the akas are (so far) difficult.  You have to start all 8 before tightening any single bolt.  Also, it is not easy to tell when they are down correctly.  I'm pretty sure that with practice there won't further issues. 

As you all know, new boats are fun precisely because there are new obstacles to overcome.  This boat is proving to be fun even without sailing it.

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Hi MultiThom,

Awesome!!  Please continue to keep us posted. 

I took the week off and have been sailing my Weta.  What a fun boat. I was imagining while I was out there that the SeaRail and Pulse would be as fun. Definitely a bigger feeling and just maybe a little dryer. :D  

Cheers,

 

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Thanks for the update.  Looking forward to reading your impression of how it sails.

Did you unfold on the water or on the trailer?

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Unfolded on the water after launch.  As I learn the boat I'll post "issues and fixes".  I may not post them here, though.  I've started a Google group for SeaRail owners and wannabes.  I suggest that if you are interested, that you join.  So far, I'm the only member besides Phil Medley who runs the SeaRail company and Bob Bilger who is a sales distributor.

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4 hours ago, MultiThom said:

Unfolded on the water after launch.  As I learn the boat I'll post "issues and fixes".  I may not post them here, though.  I've started a Google group for SeaRail owners and wannabes.  I suggest that if you are interested, that you join.  So far, I'm the only member besides Phil Medley who runs the SeaRail company and Bob Bilger who is a sales distributor.

Thom, I went to Google Groups and tried a few searches, but couldn't find your group. Link?

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Assuming the spinnaker is attached to the bowsprit, leave the sprit on the foredeck or tramp. Raise the spinnaker almost but not quite all the way and secure. Launch the boat from the trailer. Now with the bit of slack left in the spinnaker halyard, you can move the bowsprit to the bow and insert it. Then tighten up the spin halyard and you're ready.

Likewise, when returning, loosen the spin halyard just a little, remove the sprint and set it on the tramp. From here you can even lower the spin directly into your sail quiver bag, folding it around as it comes down into the bag. 

This is a quick way to rig the spinnaker and sprit even if you could do it while the boat is on the trailer. And the spinnaker never touches the ground.

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The foredeck is convex with no railings, so sprit and bag would not stay there.  The tramps on this boat do not extend past the forward AKA (no triangle nets between foredeck and ama).  The cockpit is very small and the tramps between the akas do not have sufficient space with the boat folded.  Also, there is a bobstay that has to be threaded from in front of the boat.  I suppose I could rig some snap shackle and a loop; but would still have to dangle over the bow and I'm not willing to do so.

Otherwise, that would work.

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I did do something similar to what you suggest, however, Tom.  First, I purchased an extension to my hitch receiver of 18".  SO, I was able to mount the sprit while on the hard.  Then I attached the halyard and hoisted the spin a little to get it off the deck (being careful not to let it get opened (wind was blowing 20). 

I did try to sail today.  Outboard problems (Suzuki DF2.5 long shaft replaced my Honda short shaft).  It ran poorly and intermittently (new stuff has a tendency to be problematic until you get used to it).  We did get out of the marina but engine problems coupled with sheave problems on the mast coupled with a too large luff rope prevented us from actually sailing.   We got the mainsail half way up.  This is my second new mainsail from Hyde...let's just say that I won't buy a sail from Hyde when it comes time to do so.  I will make it work by adding sail slugs.  It'll lose a tiny bit of performance but should make raising and lowering the mainsail much easier.

I'll post a "non sailing" video sometime soon.  It will just show unfolding the boat.  It is pretty easy.  I added a "leash" so I don't have to fiddle with the shrouds. 

It continues to get easier to raise the mast and get ready to sail.  Today it only took an hour to launch (first time took 2 hours).  It only took 20 minutes to unfold (first time took an hour).  I expect eventually to get close to how fast it was to get sailing with my old F24. 

 

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OK, here's how it unfolds...

 

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Sailed today, first time.  Nothing dialed in.  Winds were 9-12.  Had some issues.  Biggest one was tiller.  Couldn't leave it alone to do anything and I'm also out of practice with tiller extensions.  I intend to hook up a bungie tiller holder for tomorrow's sail.

 

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I cant leave the tiller alone at all in the weta. I have a bungee which gives me a few seconds at most. It will only stay put on a broad reach in light winds

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The jib can be held along centerline, but not pulled to windward to stay there easily (defeat the self tacking).  But the boat was mannerly (in this wind anyway) with just mainsail and tiller to one side. 

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If you're close hauled and let go of the tiller, what happens? I have the Weta adjusted so that it just eases up to the wind, definitely but slowly. It has just a touch of weather helm. Do you have any means of adjusting mast rake on the SeaRail?

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Easy to adjust mast rake.  Don't know whether or not I need it yet, though and probably won't until next spring when the winds will be more normal (don't adjust rake in 8 kt winds when prevailing breeze is 15, right?). 

Yesterday, nothing was dialed in.  Rudder was too easy to move and I "think" I felt some slop in the blade (but it might have been waves).  I'm out of practice with tiller extensions, as well.  It steers like the weta, you even think about moving the tiller and it does and the boat heading changes radically.  Nearly impossible to put into irons with jib up and not cleated to center.  Most of this will disappear as I "fiddle" with stuff to get it the way I want.  Easy to add friction to a system-thin plastic shims in the rudder pivot will probably do the trick.  If there is slop, tighten the pull up bolt and the case bolts.  Rudder hardware is built nearly exactly like the F24 rudder, so I do know how to do this.   

I did manage to use your spin system prior to launch.  I stuffed the bag into the crook between aka and vaka.  Then hoisted partially to get it out of the way.  The roller furling line came loose from the bungie that tied it to the net (fortunately after I'd furled)...what a pita it was to retrieve.

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Sailing Day 2 was fun.  Started with little breeze, built to respectable 9-12 kts.  Looking at the tack angles, you would think the boat doesn't point well...keep in mind I was beating against a 2 kt current. 
 

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Nice! It seems very fast. 9-11 kt SOG in 9-12kt TWS upwind. So you were doing 1x windspeed going upwind. Is this what an F18 would do in those conditions? 

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I am impressed with the performance.  I vaguely recall my F242 performance in similar wind and it was much slower.  I think, though, that 1x windspeed to windward is probably overly generous but time will tell.  Dunno anything about an F18 performance but I suspect they will be faster in competent hands based on the SA/Disp. 

Once the wind turned light again, I found that the self tacking jib made tacking harder since I couldn't backwind the jib to get the bow through the wind's eye.  Didn't help that I was close to rocks to leeward.  What's the fun in getting a new boat if you don't have to figure new things out, though?

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That is a nice video. 

It does seem fast  and nimble. It is relatively light. I would guess that helps. 

In low wind it is easy to manually back wind the jib.  If you have crew it is even easier as you get then to do it. :D

Keep the videos coming. 

Cheers, 

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regarding the inability to leave the tiller unattended:  Velcro autopilot works great on the Weta.  Wrap the tiller extension with the fuzzy stuff.  Adhere the hooks to the rear crossbeam where the tiller extension handle will rest on it when the tiller is centered. 

Always worked great for me.  Allowed me to use both hands for furling Gennaker and pushing down daggerboard at the leeward gate.

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Learn your balance point upwind ,to get it to sail straight. adjust  mast rake to get mild weather helm, then just drop a bit of traveler to get it to track straight,when you need both hands elsewhere. Play with the sail trim you will find the spot, not always fastest setting, but better than rounding up ending up in irons . On my Ostac Tramp this  works , down wind kite up too, but only when sailing deep, lets you get forward to correct rope snags etc, while still making good progress, freaks the nearby boats out though! Reaching is still hands on.

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Thanks for the ideas related to tiller management.  I chose to use a system I have used before.  I inserted a bungie cord of a relatively thick diameter through the eye at the bottom of a horn cleat whose primary purpose is to hold the rudder down.  By stretching the bungie between the nets, I get a nice amount of friction and no interference with steering when I need to move the tiller.  I also (as I  have done with my other multihulls) routed a tiller tamer around the nets and over the foredeck coaming so I can steer the boat without the tiller extension from anywhere on the nets or up at the front of the cockpit.

 

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Short sail today.  Boat sails well.  Not pleased with how long it takes to set up or take down; not pleased with tack angles.  Very pleased with how fast it is in light wind.

 

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On 11/12/2017 at 9:49 PM, MultiThom said:

Not pleased with how long it takes to set up or take down

Hi MultiThom,

Do not fret about the rigging time. 

Weta, F22 and other boats are claimed to be rigged in 20 minutes. I find those claims to be totally hilarious jokes. 

It takes me over an hour to rig my Weta in a good day and more like an hour and a half is there is someone on the beach who wants to talk.

Cheers, 

 

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With my Weta/dolly on the trailer, I can dismount it,  rig it and have it in the water ready to go in under 20 minutes, easy.  15 if I really push it. I have watched some other Weta sailors recently and they're doing things that they really don't need to do - i.e. never bother removing your halyards from the mast when you de-rig. Leave them on, coil and bungee them to the bottom of the top half for trailering. Leave the side shrouds attached to the amas. Don't remove them. There are many shortcuts to rigging and de-rigging the weta. I would bet anyone that I could rig 3 Weta's from trailer to water in an hour. Easy. I'm not completely sure I couldn't do 4 in an hour, but that might start to cut things close...

The Astus took me almost 3 hours at first, but with some thought and careful set-up, I've got it down to about an hour now. That includes raising the mast.

My point is that by considering what and when something needs to be done, you will eventually trim a lot of time off the rigging of the SeaRail. Just keep in mind that if you can save even 30 seconds per step, you end up saving many, many minutes over the entire process.

 

P.S. vaplaya's post convinced me that I need to make a video on how to rig the Weta. If it's taking anyone longer than 15 minutes to do it, start to finish, they're wasting time. No offense to any Weta owners, but this boat can be easily rigged in 15 minutes or less.

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I am sure that it will get faster and easier.  Many of the things that are taking too long relate to unfolding the boat next to the dock...one side is easy, the second side is harder because when your weight is on the unfolded side, the boat leans that way so you are pushing the ama down through the water instead of across the top.  Also the dock itself is an impediment since lines, fenders and the dock hang up.  A second person would be very helpful; but I did buy the boat for single handing.  Of course, it doesn't help that I'm 68 and have been diabetic for 22 years; it is taking its toll.

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One trick that someone told and works wonders to speed things up is to work in "stations", that is not to walk around and change sides all the time to do port and starboard if not needed. Stay where you are and do everything you can right there.

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Fortunately and unfortunately, I live by a wide beach, so just getting the boat and the parts to the waters edge is about 20 mins and the soft sand can be tiring (particularly hung over). Also, I am a social rigger, so I talk to every one annnddd there are the bikinis walking by; I have to stop all activity and enjoy the view. B)

Ok!!! but given all that there is no way I could do it in 15 minutes. So Tom, a video would be great!!!!!!!!!

Cheers, 

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2 hours ago, vaplaya said:

Fortunately and unfortunately, I live by a wide beach, so just getting the boat and the parts to the waters edge is about 20 mins and the soft sand can be tiring (particularly hung over). Also, I am a social rigger, so I talk to every one annnddd there are the bikinis walking by; I have to stop all activity and enjoy the view. B)

Ok!!! but given all that there is no way I could do it in 15 minutes. So Tom, a video would be great!!!!!!!!!

Cheers, 

Look at the Wheeleez tyres. could make life easier.

https://wheeleez.com/

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3 hours ago, pacice said:

Look at the Wheeleez tyres. could make life easier.

https://wheeleez.com/

I have those and they are a must on sand. That is not it, it is the actual distance. 

Cheers, 

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On 11/15/2017 at 2:41 AM, sail(plane) said:

One trick that someone told and works wonders to speed things up is to work in "stations", that is not to walk around and change sides all the time to do port and starboard if not needed. Stay where you are and do everything you can right there.

Mild thread drift.

After many years of Weta-ing (#151 and #572), and being incredibly lazy and weak, here's a few tips to making your life easy while rigging.

Cliff note version - Leave stuff rigged, don't tie knots, use a big ass bag.

  1. Don't remove lines. Keep the spin and jib lines rigged all the time. The amas can be removed and set on the dolly without taking them off.
  2. Don't remove the halyards. When you separate the mast sections, stuff the line into the bottom of the upper section and then place it on the dolly. Don't do this if you are trailering the boat. Make a fabric cover for the ends of the mast. The old jib sail bag can be used for this.
  3. Don't remove the main shrouds. Once the mast in down, coil the shrouds and stuff them under the handhold on the ama. If trailering, stuff them in the cockpit after removing the amas.
  4. Get a big windsurfing bag to put everything in. DaKine makes a bag that is the length/width of the Weta cockpit and has a long zipper down its entire length. Everything goes into this bag. And the bag stays in the cockpit when the boat is stored. Get rid of the supplied sail bags.
  5. Don't de-rig the screacher. Leave the screacher loosely rolled up, on the pole, with the furler line, and stuff it in the cockpit bag. You'll have to fold the screacher a couple of times to get it in the bag, but leave everything rigged unless you're super anal about wrinkles in your sail.
  6. Don't tie a knot in the forward tramp lines. Normally you have to tie a knot to secure the forward tramp line to the main hull. This sucks and pisses me off. Put a 1/2" ball on the end of the forward tramp line. Then loop the line through the block and back to the tramp using the 'ol loop-ball trick (see diagram below*).
  7. Don't tie knots on the jib or screacher. Use the loop-ball setup just like the tramp line (see diagram below*) or use a soft shackle. Tying knots is slow and could cause you to break a nail.
  8. Don't take the tiller extension off the tiller. Put it in the big cockpit bag.
  9. Put everything in the big DaKine cockpit bag - rudder, dagger board, paddle, tools, screacher, main, jib, lifting bridle, etc. Everything that you need to sail goes in the bag. The only thing that doesn't go in the bag are your wet cloths, PFD, and electronics. And the bag stays on the boat in the cockpit, even when you trailer the boat.

It generally it takes me about 20 minutes to rig the boat completely. I'm usually on the water in about an hour after dressing, waiting for assholes to clear the crane, crane launching, BS'ing with everyone, taking a dump, BS'ing with everyone some more, deciding if I really want to sail, etc.

*The 'ol loop-ball trick

TJmain.gif

 

Sorry for the thread drift Thom.

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1 hour ago, bhyde said:

Mild thread drift.

After many years of Weta-ing (#151 and #572), and being incredibly lazy and weak, here's a few tips to making your life easy while rigging.

Cliff note version - Leave stuff rigged, don't tie knots, use a big ass bag.

  1. Don't remove lines. Keep the spin and jib lines rigged all the time. The amas can be removed and set on the dolly without taking them off.
  2. Don't remove the halyards. When you separate the mast sections, stuff the line into the bottom of the upper section and then place it on the dolly. Don't do this if you are trailering the boat. Make a fabric cover for the ends of the mast. The old jib sail bag can be used for this.
  3. Don't remove the main shrouds. Once the mast in down, coil the shrouds and stuff them under the handhold on the ama. If trailering, stuff them in the cockpit after removing the amas.
  4. Get a big windsurfing bag to put everything in. DaKine makes a bag that is the length/width of the Weta cockpit and has a long zipper down its entire length. Everything goes into this bag. And the bag stays in the cockpit when the boat is stored. Get rid of the supplied sail bags.
  5. Don't de-rig the screacher. Leave the screacher loosely rolled up, on the pole, with the furler line, and stuff it in the cockpit bag. You'll have to fold the screacher a couple of times to get it in the bag, but leave everything rigged unless you're super anal about wrinkles in your sail.
  6. Don't tie a knot in the forward tramp lines. Normally you have to tie a knot to secure the forward tramp line to the main hull. This sucks and pisses me off. Put a 1/2" ball on the end of the forward tramp line. Then loop the line through the block and back to the tramp using the 'ol loop-ball trick (see diagram below*).
  7. Don't tie knots on the jib or screacher. Use the loop-ball setup just like the tramp line (see diagram below*) or use a soft shackle. Tying knots is slow and could cause you to break a nail.
  8. Don't take the tiller extension off the tiller. Put it in the big cockpit bag.
  9. Put everything in the big DaKine cockpit bag - rudder, dagger board, paddle, tools, screacher, main, jib, lifting bridle, etc. Everything that you need to sail goes in the bag. The only thing that doesn't go in the bag are your wet cloths, PFD, and electronics. And the bag stays on the boat in the cockpit, even when you trailer the boat.

It generally it takes me about 20 minutes to rig the boat completely. I'm usually on the water in about an hour after dressing, waiting for assholes to clear the crane, crane launching, BS'ing with everyone, taking a dump, BS'ing with everyone some more, deciding if I really want to sail, etc.

*The 'ol loop-ball trick

TJmain.gif

 

Sorry for the thread drift Thom.

I was all cocky thinking "this bhyde can´t teach me nothing about fast rigging a Weta" while I checked away all items in your list... until you got me with the ´ol loop-ball

I humbly admit... I didn´t think of that :-)

 

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8 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

I was all cocky thinking "this bhyde can´t teach me nothing about fast rigging a Weta" while I checked away all items in your list... until you got me with the ´ol loop-ball

I humbly admit... I didn´t think of that :-)

 

Don't feel bad. It only took me 6-7 years and two boats to figure it out, but laziness is the mother of invention. I think the reason a lot of people don't sail more is the rigging hassle. 

Next up: A "boat breaker" to pin the headstay instead of lashing it...(I'm open to ideas)

Edit: BTW, I use airless wheels on the dolly. No flat tires and no reason to bring a pump.

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No worries about thread drift.  I'll post something about the actual boat and blog when there is something worth telling.  I did put the boat in the water last weekend, but had a crap day.  But, that's sailing.  Once in a while things just align to make you wish you were home in front of the fire.  The one exciting sailing thing was the wind was big enough to bury the lee ama...yee haw.  Unfolding was easier using the "trick" of having the halyard attached on the dock side to keep the boat level for the outboard side unfolding.  The crap was from the spinnaker...it won't stay furled when up and it won't stay on the boat when down.  SO, at least for the near future, I'll switch to standard launch retrieve from the cabin (just install a block at the sprit end for a guy).  Still having trouble with leaving the tiller untendend; so those are my "chores" before the next sail.  I find that these sorts of "chores" provide a lot of enjoyment to me.

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10 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

No worries about thread drift.  I'll post something about the actual boat and blog when there is something worth telling.  I did put the boat in the water last weekend, but had a crap day.  But, that's sailing.  Once in a while things just align to make you wish you were home in front of the fire.  The one exciting sailing thing was the wind was big enough to bury the lee ama...yee haw.  Unfolding was easier using the "trick" of having the halyard attached on the dock side to keep the boat level for the outboard side unfolding.  The crap was from the spinnaker...it won't stay furled when up and it won't stay on the boat when down.  SO, at least for the near future, I'll switch to standard launch retrieve from the cabin (just install a block at the sprit end for a guy).  Still having trouble with leaving the tiller untendend; so those are my "chores" before the next sail.  I find that these sorts of "chores" provide a lot of enjoyment to me.

Strangely Thom, I also live in Benicia. I watched a couple of the videos you posted and had to giggle because I actually saw my house. What are the odds?

Btw: I found on both my Wetas and F24 that a bungie cord over the top of the tiller is the best way to keep it from flopping around at inopportune times. Enough friction to keep the tiller in place and not so much you can't put it where you want.

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11 hours ago, bhyde said:

Don't feel bad. It only took me 6-7 years and two boats to figure it out, but laziness is the mother of invention. I think the reason a lot of people don't sail more is the rigging hassle. 

Next up: A "boat breaker" to pin the headstay instead of lashing it...(I'm open to ideas)

Edit: BTW, I use airless wheels on the dolly. No flat tires and no reason to bring a pump.

bhyde, I posted a boat breaker idea on the weta anarchy, so we keep this one for the Searail

Thom, keep it up!

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11 hours ago, bhyde said:

Strangely Thom, I also live in Benicia. I watched a couple of the videos you posted and had to giggle because I actually saw my house. What are the odds?

Btw: I found on both my Wetas and F24 that a bungie cord over the top of the tiller is the best way to keep it from flopping around at inopportune times. Enough friction to keep the tiller in place and not so much you can't put it where you want.

I could use crew occasionally while learning the boat.  Interested?

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On 1/17/2018 at 8:59 PM, MultiThom said:

No worries about thread drift.  I'll post something about the actual boat and blog when there is something worth telling.  I did put the boat in the water last weekend, but had a crap day.  But, that's sailing.  Once in a while things just align to make you wish you were home in front of the fire.  The one exciting sailing thing was the wind was big enough to bury the lee ama...yee haw.  Unfolding was easier using the "trick" of having the halyard attached on the dock side to keep the boat level for the outboard side unfolding.  The crap was from the spinnaker...it won't stay furled when up and it won't stay on the boat when down.  SO, at least for the near future, I'll switch to standard launch retrieve from the cabin (just install a block at the sprit end for a guy).  Still having trouble with leaving the tiller untendend; so those are my "chores" before the next sail.  I find that these sorts of "chores" provide a lot of enjoyment to me.

Changed my mind about cabin spin launch/retrieve.  Decided to convert to top down furling. 

You can convert any continuous line furler into a top down furler with the creation or purchase of a couple parts.  First, you need a wheel with bearings on an axle (I used a bicycle wheel hub).  You will have to make eyes on the axle so you can attach the furler on one side and an anti-torque line on the other.  You will attach the sail tack to the wheel.  You see what this does, right?  you twist the furler drum and the anti-torque line gets twisted while the spin tack doesn't twist.   Oh yah, you could buy one from Facnor or someone else who makes a top down furler--only cost $1K or so.  Mine cost $40. The other part you need is anti-torque line.  You can buy it for $8-10 per foot and you will need to also buy terminations since anti-torque line doesn't splice worth a crap.  OR, if you are cheap (like me), you can make your own.  I used an old halyard from my old Hobie cat.  It was pretty worn and stretched, but that's what makes it pretty good for resisting torque.  You can't use that alone, though.  If you try, the line will hockle and when the spinnaker wraps around it, it will never come off (believe me, I did lots of trial and error 20 years ago).  SO, you need a platen (fancy word for something that will allow the spin fabric to release easily).   I use ordinary drip system 1/2" tube.  The tube only has to go down to about where the clew is.  Then you use your handistitcher to stitch the tube to the line.  Tie bowlines at the sail head ring and the top eye on your axle.  Voila...a top down furler.  It doesn't store in your bag as easily, though...the tubing isn't as flexible as line alone--I can live with that.  I should be able to keep that hoisted without it unfurling while underway like the bottom up furling lines do.

As far as the tiller tamer goes, I will probably just add another bungie.

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Hi Tom, would you have pictures of the systems you build. I very interested in building one myself during this winter...

herve

IMG_0196.jpg

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Here's a couple photos

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20180128_142942_resized.jpg

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Thank you very much,Tom; i understand it better now. i'll try to do one before spring

herve

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OK, March 30 and I finally went out sailing again.  It has been cold and rain a lot, but today was warm, but not much wind.  Basically, just drifting and pretend sailing.

After so much time between sails, I forgot stuff, like forgot the fenders and the lock for when I left it and forgot to take the mast rotation stopper off.  Maybe tomorrow will be funner. 

 

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Wind finally from the usual direction.  Raised mast prior to leaving marina (Much Simpler).  Wind was only 5-8 kts and had a 2 kt current going to weather.  LOTS of tacks.  Self Tacking jib is awesome.

 

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Sorry, meant raised mainsail prior to leaving marina. Also, in case it isn't obvious, the 2 kt current was coming from the weather direction.

 

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Sailed today, no video.  Had crew (fortunately).  Only went out for an hour since I had to wait at the launch ramp for an hour (had to wait for tide).  Light breeze.  Will sail tomorrow and again on Sunday.  Boat does take an hour to get into the water from the trailer.  Can't really see how to shave much off that.  Unfolding also takes a little longer than I'd like because fiddling with the shroud adjusters and 8 bolts. Had crew which was great since I rigged the spin furler line incorrectly.  The biggest drawback (for me) in this boat is that if you screw up the rigging on the hard, you can't really fix it on the water since the sprit is way out there.  SO, lesson, don't screw up the rigging.  If you look at the downwind track and wonder why it looks like we were drunk...well, we weren't.  Just had rigging issues and then we had no wind areas.  Tomorrow should be nice and warm...but...not much wind. 

April20track.jpg

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Sailed today in light stuff again.  This time current was pushing me to weather-but then had to do about 20 gybes to get back-finally wind died and had to motor about a mile.  Here's the track.  SeaRail does do well in light stuff.  I'll probably just put the boat back on the trailer tomorrow instead of repeating today's sail. 

April21track.jpg

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It is interesting how we can watch from afar and understand .  ....i like the little design  and hope the team get a bit of traction in the market place....seems to do the job quite well

you are the Guinea Pig but from the posts the problems can be fixed ...the best thing was to install the folding mechanism  then the furler   enjoy the sail or the drift

Thanks for your posts

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11 hours ago, huey 2 said:

It is interesting how we can watch from afar and understand .  ....i like the little design  and hope the team get a bit of traction in the market place....seems to do the job quite well

you are the Guinea Pig but from the posts the problems can be fixed ...the best thing was to install the folding mechanism  then the furler   enjoy the sail or the drift

Thanks for your posts

To be clear, SeaRail (Phil Medley) engineered and installed the folding mechanism and all future boats will be folding.  I did transform the bottom up furler to a top down furler-simply because the existing anti torque line supplied by Hyde Sails was crap, so the sail wouldn't stay furled at the top if you left it up.   Top down furling is more time consuming than bottom up furling, but the furl is more secure if you leave the sail up.  Not a good choice, actually, for around the cans racing.  I haven't had to do much to the boat, halyard changes, snap shackles here and there to speed the process from trailer to sailor. 

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Another light wind sailing day today.  Beat upwind for a couple hours, took half an hour to get back.  Easy boat to sail. 

 

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Had a little more wind (8-12) today but had helping current to weather--but that created a 3 foot chop in spots.  SeaRail slows down a bunch in chop.  Camera didn't work so video is from my neighbor's cell phone. 

 

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Had new crew today and short aborted sail.  Wind forecast was for gusts in the 30s.  Lots of chop when I left the marina entrance and the main halyard slumped...So I got to two  blocked on the mainsheet so I could not put tension on the forestay--so I couldn't tack.  SO, I bailed after about 15 minutes or so.  Made a decent video, though, showing how the boat looks in chop.

 

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Was a nice day sail.  Setup with help is down to 1.5 hours from arrival at launch ramp to sailing out of the marina.  Don't think I can trim too much more from that without getting rid of the lashing lines (fiddling with them takes a lot of time).  Wind was 10-12 with gusts to 15 or so.  Video is only of the downwind portion since camcorder SD card got full. 
 
I found a leak in the daggerboard trunk that I attempted to repair after the last trip...but then I had difficulty dropping the board in the slot and had to force it, which may have undone my repair since I still noticed a lot of water under the cockpit--oh well; if at first you don't succeed...
 
We had a good ride upwind with occasional gusts forcing the lee ama nearly under water.  From the tramps, it is very difficult (impossible for me) to uncleat the traveler; so I may have to replace the camcleat with something easier to uncleat...it may be a technique thing, so I'll hold off on that for a while.  We stopped for lunch (hove to) and watched a 40 foot monohull get about 3 miles away beating to weather...we passed it about 6 miles after lunch...it's why I like multihulls.
 
 

 

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Well, as you saw on the GPS speedometer, it was just a gust; most of the sail was under that.  I'm starting to get into the windy part of the year so speeds should go up with the wind.  Which, incidentally, is why handicapping multis with monos is near impossible, multis go a fraction of windspeed (fraction (multiple) determined by point of sail); monos (keelboats anyway) go hull speed regardless of windspeed or point of sail pretty much.  Which, also incidentally, is why I don't race anymore, for multis it is not satisfying because the winner is oft determined by handicap (ie, politics in the rating committee); for multi/mono races, it is not satisfying because winner is course/windspeed determined; for one design, who wants a boat you can't play with and change?  But, like your moniker, I do like to pass giant monohulls on the water.

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Well, haven't been sailing much since got a new puppy and winds are now really big.  Today, though, had an ex-neighbor visit so we went out.  Still having trouble with spinnaker.  Just need a way to keep it out of the way until I want to use it.  Cabin launch or snuffer bag-or maybe just leave the damn thing ashore until the winds are light again...

 

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Awsome video you share with us all here, i wish i could come play there with my pulse600 and sail with you and your buddies

nice save but the searail did most of the work...:rolleyes:   You are my new on the water fucking anarchy hero...

 

INSPIRING...

 

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5 hours ago, monomuncher said:

Awsome video you share with us all here, i wish i could come play there with my pulse600 and sail with you and your buddies

nice save but the searail did most of the work...:rolleyes:   INSPIRING...

 

Thanks for that.  Boat is lively in bigger breeze, chop did slow it down some.  I think my F242 would have been faster in this sea state and wind...at least that's what I remember; but memory dims after 8 years.  I'd like to have a Pulse 600 to sail alongside; I would have gotten one except for 10Gs different price and thinking that it would just be a smaller F242 and already did that.

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Nice Video!! It is good to see it on a breeze.  Can't wait to see it with the shute up in a breeze.

Keep the videos coming. 

Cheers, 

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Decided to go out today.  Wind was in the teens so no hu-hu.  Went out with full main and did not deploy the jib since I'm going out again tomorrow and maybe over the weekend as well--I was just testing out the shroud knotting system I've decided to "go with".  Boat is very lively with just one person on board.  Seriously quick. 

 

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Well, today wasn't  a sailing day even though I was going to.  Wind was in the 20s so decided to forego the "fun".  So, boat is back in the side yard waiting for a little nicer breeze for the old geezer. 

 

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On 7/20/2018 at 11:47 PM, MultiThom said:

Well, haven't been sailing much since got a new puppy and winds are now really big.  Today, though, had an ex-neighbor visit so we went out.  Still having trouble with spinnaker.  Just need a way to keep it out of the way until I want to use it.  Cabin launch or snuffer bag-or maybe just leave the damn thing ashore until the winds are light again...

Gosh, looks like it was a hands full kind of day.    Are the amas fully sealed? Minus a breather hole.   It looks like they get fully immersed a fair bit in the video.

 

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Hey Thom,

Great videos. Fun to watch.

How is your mainsail attached to the mast?  In one of the videos, when it backwinds, I can see a significant gap between the mainsail and the mast.  Just curious why that is.

Cheers,

Eric

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54 minutes ago, efrank said:

Hey Thom,

Great videos. Fun to watch.

How is your mainsail attached to the mast?  In one of the videos, when it backwinds, I can see a significant gap between the mainsail and the mast.  Just curious why that is.

Cheers,

Eric

I did an aftermarket mod on my mainsail by adding some sail slides.  I did this because the Hyde loft put a boltrope in it that was too large-especially given that the sail track shares space with the halyard coming down inside.  They later sent me another mainsail as a replacement but it too had a too large boltrope.  I took that one to a local loft (not Hyde) and had a right sized boltrope put in place.  But I kept both sails-I figure I will use the one with slides as a practice mainsail and the one with the boltrope for races.  You can see one of the advantages of sail slides on one video where I had to drop the sail going downwind...Easy to do with slides...not easy at all with boltrope.

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3 hours ago, Loose Cannon said:

Gosh, looks like it was a hands full kind of day.    Are the amas fully sealed? Minus a breather hole.   It looks like they get fully immersed a fair bit in the video.

 

Was a hands full day.  Boat was really lively and first time on the boat for crew...I should have tied the spin down on the nets before going out.  But, after we got the spin down, boat handled the upwind very well. 

The amas have two access hatches-one in the stern and one in the middle--haven't ever opened the one in the middle yet.  I know there is a forward bulkhead internal, as well and I expect it has weep holes for breathing.  Amas are designed to submerge and with the trampolines supported above them the ama being submerged doesn't slow the boat - which is a first for me.  My F242 would feel like it hit a wall. 

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It looks like it accelerates quickly.  Does it feels that way? 

I know is a relatively light boat.

Cheers,

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You can feel it accelerate.  But the feeling isn't much if any different than what an F242 or Hobie Getaway feels like in a gust or after a tack.  The F242 weighs twice as much and the Getaway half as much (SeaRail 900 pounds, Getaway 400  and F242 2200).  The SeaRail should be faster than both boats in most conditions, but in the moment, it feels about the same.  So far, at least, the boat is performing well but I won't know how well/poorly it performs against other design until I race...and that might not happen in a while since it is logistically difficult and no longer have much fire in my substantial belly.

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lol u crack me up thom, you have more fire than most sailers and you have it where it counts.. awsome vids, i plan to do my share..

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Had decent wind yesterday and flat water because current was with the wind.  Tack angles are awful, of course because of that.  Wind was low teens. 

 

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Sir, I really appreciate learning about your boat.  I would enjoy a view from the back looking forward toward the bows so we can see how the hulls move through the water.

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, mundt said:

Sir, I really appreciate learning about your boat.  I would enjoy a view from the back looking forward toward the bows so we can see how the hulls move through the water.

I have a rig to do that with, attaches to the rear mast rest holes and flys behind the boat looking forward...but that's more "stuff" than I want to carry right now.  Might do it in the winter, but then there's not much wind.  Actually, did that last winter and posted the video above in sailing day 2.   However, what you want to see is probably not there since the leeward ama is always behind the mainsail.  I'll see what I can come up with in the future. 

 

Edited by MultiThom
Looked at video suggestion and not worth looking at for him.

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I sailed to greet the front runners in the Jazz Cup and took some video.  Some brief shots of lee hull going to weather...but mostly boat handling and other boats with spinnakers in the Jazz Cup.

 

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Went sailing yesterday and plan on sailing again today.  Here's the video from yesterday.  If you are in Canada, you probably won't be able to see it since there is a copyright claim from Canada for the audio file...don't you just love YouTube (heavy sarcasm)?  Mild conditions, good for single handing, wind below teens probably 8-12 kts,

 

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Had a nice warm Indian Summer Sail in light breeze.  2 spin runs.  Lots and Lots of tacks-thank goodness for self tacking jib.

 

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Went for a daysail on a whim.  Wind was 10 or less but from the South, which meant that I would reach/reach there and back again.  Was fun.  The boat has three "defects" IMO.  The first is a manufacturer's mistake, they created a leak in the daggerboard trunk.  The second is lee helm...I've not been able to rake the mast far enough aft to get weather helm; I've raked it until the mainsheet and jib sheet are nearly two blocked when going to weather.  Finally, the boat just takes too long to setup and take down for a day sailor.  My F242 was probably a good hour from trailer to sailing singlehanded.  This boat takes twice as long.

All those bitches aside, it is a fun boat when you do get sailing.  

 

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Had the itch so since temps in the upper 70s  and wind was light but OK and current was negligible...went sailing.  Not much to say.  Boat has lee helm still except when the mainsail is oversheeted...dunno what to think about that.  Relaxing sail.  Still takes longer to get from home to sailing (about 2 hours).  Other than that, nice boat.  

 

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Very light breeze.  Had to motor several times to find wind.  I find these sorts of conditions to be challenging.  SeaRail is an excellent boat in light wind.  I even pulled the mainsail clew to windward for additional twist which honestly didn't seem to help much.  Using mainsails with luff rope now.  Having trouble getting it up (no, not that) all the way to the top...last 4 feet is a problem; so I'll use slugs from the reef point; should be easier.  Similarly, hard to pull down (and yes, I have lubed the track and the luff rope). 

https://youtu.be/VnynpmqNPls

 

 

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First year recap with my experiences with the SeaRail 19.  I sailed 19 times or about one and a half days per month on average.  Each sail averaged about 2 hours on the water.  Top speed I saw was 16 kts but the boat wasn't even close to being pressed at the time.  I suspect it will go 20 or maybe even more...since I don't race anymore, it will not likely see much faster.  Upwind the boat is a dream to single hand with the self tacking jib.  I have the boat pretty much the way I want it, now; but since I enjoy puttering I'll probably make more changes.  Three nagging issues...two are leaks, one ama leaks and daggerboard trunk leaks--nothing I can't live with, but nagging issue none the leas.  The last nag is lee helm.  It is an irritant and I'll work at more rake (but I need either a longer forestay or an extension); plus I'm getting close to mainsheet two block in a big breeze.  Finally, something that isn't a nag but is something I'll have to live with...my three previous boats were faster to get from trailer to sailing--so I'm spoiled by F242, Hobie Getaway and Triak....I'll just have to live with it.

 

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