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MultiThom

SeaRail 19 Owners Blog/Vlog

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Well, I still haven't sailed the boat, yet.  I did modify the provided mainsail by cutting off the excess reinforcements along the luff rope.  Took me a couple hours.  But it now will go up the mast track easily.  I expect the replacement mainsail in a few days.  But until then, I do have a sail that will work if there is ever any wind (October winds are generally light in SF Bay area).

The 3000 mile journey to get the boat was not uneventful.  IN Kansas, the winds were 30kts from the side so trailering was difficult.  In Wyoming there was thick fog, rain and snow all the way to Salt Lake city.

Now back in the Bay I have launched and unfolded.  Boat is sweet.  Didn't sail, though BECAUSE my outboard isn't working reliably.  I have a Honda 2.3 that is now 2 years old.  It is short shaft and it barely has the prop in the water when I am sitting in the stern...That's OK but it isn't running reliably...I did an oil change but I think I overfilled and a wet sump can cause carb problems if you overfill. 

Boat has a huge amount of rake and a very long centerboard.  I expect it to point very well for a trimaran.  I love the self tacking jib.  I love the under traveler tiller (no more tossing the tiller extension around the mainsheet). 

Some stuff I think I'll have to work on:

  • Attaching the bowsprit and spin requires partially launching since the sprit is so long it would hit the truck if you didn't do that.
  • Unfolding requires you to loosen the shrouds...folding requires you to loosen the shrouds.  That is, the shrouds are played with a bunch.  I'll probably get used to that; but right now it is a source of trepidation.  I've been dismasted 3 times already...don't want to do it again.
  • Unfolding was difficult.  You have to help the amas out by stepping on the folding mechanism.  Similarly for folding...I expect some of this will abate after some practice.
  • The 8 bolts to secure the akas are (so far) difficult.  You have to start all 8 before tightening any single bolt.  Also, it is not easy to tell when they are down correctly.  I'm pretty sure that with practice there won't further issues. 

As you all know, new boats are fun precisely because there are new obstacles to overcome.  This boat is proving to be fun even without sailing it.

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Hi MultiThom,

Awesome!!  Please continue to keep us posted. 

I took the week off and have been sailing my Weta.  What a fun boat. I was imagining while I was out there that the SeaRail and Pulse would be as fun. Definitely a bigger feeling and just maybe a little dryer. :D  

Cheers,

 

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Thanks for the update.  Looking forward to reading your impression of how it sails.

Did you unfold on the water or on the trailer?

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Unfolded on the water after launch.  As I learn the boat I'll post "issues and fixes".  I may not post them here, though.  I've started a Google group for SeaRail owners and wannabes.  I suggest that if you are interested, that you join.  So far, I'm the only member besides Phil Medley who runs the SeaRail company and Bob Bilger who is a sales distributor.

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4 hours ago, MultiThom said:

Unfolded on the water after launch.  As I learn the boat I'll post "issues and fixes".  I may not post them here, though.  I've started a Google group for SeaRail owners and wannabes.  I suggest that if you are interested, that you join.  So far, I'm the only member besides Phil Medley who runs the SeaRail company and Bob Bilger who is a sales distributor.

Thom, I went to Google Groups and tried a few searches, but couldn't find your group. Link?

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Assuming the spinnaker is attached to the bowsprit, leave the sprit on the foredeck or tramp. Raise the spinnaker almost but not quite all the way and secure. Launch the boat from the trailer. Now with the bit of slack left in the spinnaker halyard, you can move the bowsprit to the bow and insert it. Then tighten up the spin halyard and you're ready.

Likewise, when returning, loosen the spin halyard just a little, remove the sprint and set it on the tramp. From here you can even lower the spin directly into your sail quiver bag, folding it around as it comes down into the bag. 

This is a quick way to rig the spinnaker and sprit even if you could do it while the boat is on the trailer. And the spinnaker never touches the ground.

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The foredeck is convex with no railings, so sprit and bag would not stay there.  The tramps on this boat do not extend past the forward AKA (no triangle nets between foredeck and ama).  The cockpit is very small and the tramps between the akas do not have sufficient space with the boat folded.  Also, there is a bobstay that has to be threaded from in front of the boat.  I suppose I could rig some snap shackle and a loop; but would still have to dangle over the bow and I'm not willing to do so.

Otherwise, that would work.

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I did do something similar to what you suggest, however, Tom.  First, I purchased an extension to my hitch receiver of 18".  SO, I was able to mount the sprit while on the hard.  Then I attached the halyard and hoisted the spin a little to get it off the deck (being careful not to let it get opened (wind was blowing 20). 

I did try to sail today.  Outboard problems (Suzuki DF2.5 long shaft replaced my Honda short shaft).  It ran poorly and intermittently (new stuff has a tendency to be problematic until you get used to it).  We did get out of the marina but engine problems coupled with sheave problems on the mast coupled with a too large luff rope prevented us from actually sailing.   We got the mainsail half way up.  This is my second new mainsail from Hyde...let's just say that I won't buy a sail from Hyde when it comes time to do so.  I will make it work by adding sail slugs.  It'll lose a tiny bit of performance but should make raising and lowering the mainsail much easier.

I'll post a "non sailing" video sometime soon.  It will just show unfolding the boat.  It is pretty easy.  I added a "leash" so I don't have to fiddle with the shrouds. 

It continues to get easier to raise the mast and get ready to sail.  Today it only took an hour to launch (first time took 2 hours).  It only took 20 minutes to unfold (first time took an hour).  I expect eventually to get close to how fast it was to get sailing with my old F24. 

 

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Sailed today, first time.  Nothing dialed in.  Winds were 9-12.  Had some issues.  Biggest one was tiller.  Couldn't leave it alone to do anything and I'm also out of practice with tiller extensions.  I intend to hook up a bungie tiller holder for tomorrow's sail.

 

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I cant leave the tiller alone at all in the weta. I have a bungee which gives me a few seconds at most. It will only stay put on a broad reach in light winds

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The jib can be held along centerline, but not pulled to windward to stay there easily (defeat the self tacking).  But the boat was mannerly (in this wind anyway) with just mainsail and tiller to one side. 

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If you're close hauled and let go of the tiller, what happens? I have the Weta adjusted so that it just eases up to the wind, definitely but slowly. It has just a touch of weather helm. Do you have any means of adjusting mast rake on the SeaRail?

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Easy to adjust mast rake.  Don't know whether or not I need it yet, though and probably won't until next spring when the winds will be more normal (don't adjust rake in 8 kt winds when prevailing breeze is 15, right?). 

Yesterday, nothing was dialed in.  Rudder was too easy to move and I "think" I felt some slop in the blade (but it might have been waves).  I'm out of practice with tiller extensions, as well.  It steers like the weta, you even think about moving the tiller and it does and the boat heading changes radically.  Nearly impossible to put into irons with jib up and not cleated to center.  Most of this will disappear as I "fiddle" with stuff to get it the way I want.  Easy to add friction to a system-thin plastic shims in the rudder pivot will probably do the trick.  If there is slop, tighten the pull up bolt and the case bolts.  Rudder hardware is built nearly exactly like the F24 rudder, so I do know how to do this.   

I did manage to use your spin system prior to launch.  I stuffed the bag into the crook between aka and vaka.  Then hoisted partially to get it out of the way.  The roller furling line came loose from the bungie that tied it to the net (fortunately after I'd furled)...what a pita it was to retrieve.

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Sailing Day 2 was fun.  Started with little breeze, built to respectable 9-12 kts.  Looking at the tack angles, you would think the boat doesn't point well...keep in mind I was beating against a 2 kt current. 
 

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Nice! It seems very fast. 9-11 kt SOG in 9-12kt TWS upwind. So you were doing 1x windspeed going upwind. Is this what an F18 would do in those conditions? 

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I am impressed with the performance.  I vaguely recall my F242 performance in similar wind and it was much slower.  I think, though, that 1x windspeed to windward is probably overly generous but time will tell.  Dunno anything about an F18 performance but I suspect they will be faster in competent hands based on the SA/Disp. 

Once the wind turned light again, I found that the self tacking jib made tacking harder since I couldn't backwind the jib to get the bow through the wind's eye.  Didn't help that I was close to rocks to leeward.  What's the fun in getting a new boat if you don't have to figure new things out, though?

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That is a nice video. 

It does seem fast  and nimble. It is relatively light. I would guess that helps. 

In low wind it is easy to manually back wind the jib.  If you have crew it is even easier as you get then to do it. :D

Keep the videos coming. 

Cheers, 

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regarding the inability to leave the tiller unattended:  Velcro autopilot works great on the Weta.  Wrap the tiller extension with the fuzzy stuff.  Adhere the hooks to the rear crossbeam where the tiller extension handle will rest on it when the tiller is centered. 

Always worked great for me.  Allowed me to use both hands for furling Gennaker and pushing down daggerboard at the leeward gate.

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Learn your balance point upwind ,to get it to sail straight. adjust  mast rake to get mild weather helm, then just drop a bit of traveler to get it to track straight,when you need both hands elsewhere. Play with the sail trim you will find the spot, not always fastest setting, but better than rounding up ending up in irons . On my Ostac Tramp this  works , down wind kite up too, but only when sailing deep, lets you get forward to correct rope snags etc, while still making good progress, freaks the nearby boats out though! Reaching is still hands on.

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Thanks for the ideas related to tiller management.  I chose to use a system I have used before.  I inserted a bungie cord of a relatively thick diameter through the eye at the bottom of a horn cleat whose primary purpose is to hold the rudder down.  By stretching the bungie between the nets, I get a nice amount of friction and no interference with steering when I need to move the tiller.  I also (as I  have done with my other multihulls) routed a tiller tamer around the nets and over the foredeck coaming so I can steer the boat without the tiller extension from anywhere on the nets or up at the front of the cockpit.

 

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Short sail today.  Boat sails well.  Not pleased with how long it takes to set up or take down; not pleased with tack angles.  Very pleased with how fast it is in light wind.

 

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On 11/12/2017 at 9:49 PM, MultiThom said:

Not pleased with how long it takes to set up or take down

Hi MultiThom,

Do not fret about the rigging time. 

Weta, F22 and other boats are claimed to be rigged in 20 minutes. I find those claims to be totally hilarious jokes. 

It takes me over an hour to rig my Weta in a good day and more like an hour and a half is there is someone on the beach who wants to talk.

Cheers, 

 

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With my Weta/dolly on the trailer, I can dismount it,  rig it and have it in the water ready to go in under 20 minutes, easy.  15 if I really push it. I have watched some other Weta sailors recently and they're doing things that they really don't need to do - i.e. never bother removing your halyards from the mast when you de-rig. Leave them on, coil and bungee them to the bottom of the top half for trailering. Leave the side shrouds attached to the amas. Don't remove them. There are many shortcuts to rigging and de-rigging the weta. I would bet anyone that I could rig 3 Weta's from trailer to water in an hour. Easy. I'm not completely sure I couldn't do 4 in an hour, but that might start to cut things close...

The Astus took me almost 3 hours at first, but with some thought and careful set-up, I've got it down to about an hour now. That includes raising the mast.

My point is that by considering what and when something needs to be done, you will eventually trim a lot of time off the rigging of the SeaRail. Just keep in mind that if you can save even 30 seconds per step, you end up saving many, many minutes over the entire process.

 

P.S. vaplaya's post convinced me that I need to make a video on how to rig the Weta. If it's taking anyone longer than 15 minutes to do it, start to finish, they're wasting time. No offense to any Weta owners, but this boat can be easily rigged in 15 minutes or less.

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I am sure that it will get faster and easier.  Many of the things that are taking too long relate to unfolding the boat next to the dock...one side is easy, the second side is harder because when your weight is on the unfolded side, the boat leans that way so you are pushing the ama down through the water instead of across the top.  Also the dock itself is an impediment since lines, fenders and the dock hang up.  A second person would be very helpful; but I did buy the boat for single handing.  Of course, it doesn't help that I'm 68 and have been diabetic for 22 years; it is taking its toll.

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One trick that someone told and works wonders to speed things up is to work in "stations", that is not to walk around and change sides all the time to do port and starboard if not needed. Stay where you are and do everything you can right there.

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Fortunately and unfortunately, I live by a wide beach, so just getting the boat and the parts to the waters edge is about 20 mins and the soft sand can be tiring (particularly hung over). Also, I am a social rigger, so I talk to every one annnddd there are the bikinis walking by; I have to stop all activity and enjoy the view. B)

Ok!!! but given all that there is no way I could do it in 15 minutes. So Tom, a video would be great!!!!!!!!!

Cheers, 

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2 hours ago, vaplaya said:

Fortunately and unfortunately, I live by a wide beach, so just getting the boat and the parts to the waters edge is about 20 mins and the soft sand can be tiring (particularly hung over). Also, I am a social rigger, so I talk to every one annnddd there are the bikinis walking by; I have to stop all activity and enjoy the view. B)

Ok!!! but given all that there is no way I could do it in 15 minutes. So Tom, a video would be great!!!!!!!!!

Cheers, 

Look at the Wheeleez tyres. could make life easier.

https://wheeleez.com/

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