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Suggestions on how to remove Sikaflex residue?

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Anyone have any suggestions for removing Sikaflex from this aluminum hatch base --other than a scraper and razor blades?  E.g., something to thin it with: acetone, or Varsol/paint thinner?  

(Yes, those are flip flops :-) )

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8 minutes ago, IStream said:

DSR-5 is a good debonder. 30 minutes with that, a plastic scraper, and some elbow grease and it'll be clean.

https://www.amazon.com/So-Brite-DSR-5-Ready-Solvent/dp/B00ANN7IAO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1507398932&sr=8-1&keywords=dsr-5

 

Great - thanks for the info.  I've never heard of the stuff.

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A small non-knotted fine SS wire brush  bit in a drill motor works well once the big stuff is gone for getting it back to bare metal.  The slow speed makes it pretty safe, pretty much every hardware store stocks them.

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Kerosene and salt. No, wait, that’s for treating poison ivy. 

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2” 3M Roloc disks, scotch brite medium, on a die grinder.  That’s how mechanics clean gasket surfaces of old gasket compound, etc.  They’re awesome.  Check Amazon.  

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Where as rotolock 3m are good on a die grinder they can do a lot of damage in a hurry.  Aluminum goes away I a hurry.  They are fine for flat steel surfaces like a big block or heads.  I wish they would add a little diversity, maroon which is 220 in theory to Blue is never a consistent thing.

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If you are looking for something abrasive, pop over to PA.

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24 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

If you are looking for something abrasive, pop over to PA.

More caustic, and quite possibly toxic than abrasive. 

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Nobody mentioned Goof off cleaner. Used to remove polyeurethane from wdws and flashing as well as paint.

https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/b0ea8894-0f15-4d19-aa97-af8f0c4e6954_1.3f791f82ba8fd7dd2fb36becbf41bb4d.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF

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Use a rotary wire wheel....medium stiff.. at low rpm 

 

 Avoid chemicals, solvent...huge toxic mess

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The PS article was in 2 parts:

  • DSR-5/Remove for Silicone. Very effective.
  • Debond for Polyurethane.

There is no general purpose remover. Not surprising, since the chemistry of the two have nothing in common.  Match the product to the task.

Solvents and Goo-gone are basically a waste of time, although they do make polyurethane a bit softer. They don't touch silicone.

Score the edges, apply the remover, and then start pealing. Finish up with a small wire brush and a hose hook for the grooves. I've done a lot of hatches, tested multiple methods for articles, and this is what works with the least damage.

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Another vote for the 2" roloc "material conditioning" disks, preferably on a air angle die grinder. Will make short work of the whole shebang except in tight corners. Maroon or beige will work equally well.

It won't remove material if you use it intelligently and develop a feel for speed/pressure/etc. I did four aluminum Lewmar ocean hatch bases not so long ago with the disks, getting 5200 off. Was a Godsend.

That said when you're done I would still hit it with DaBond or similar, then wash clean, then appropriate solvent to ensure you have a good clean surface for rebedding.

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I see the opening post is old, but, in case you're not done or someone else is reading this, I have found that a heat gun works best, along with a scraper.  A wood scraper won't damage the underlying surface as much as a metal one, and won't melt like a plastic one.  Heat works much better than chemical methods or mechanical methods alone.  Once most of the bulk of the urethane caulk (sikaflex, vulkem, etc) is removed, the last of the residue can be taken off with acetone.

You want to be careful about fire safety and about toxic fumes when using the heat gun.  And the acetone, too, for that matter.

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On 07/10/2017 at 11:16 AM, Ishmael said:

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Any experience using it on silicone?  A lot of products say they work but they're always full of shit

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32 minutes ago, cameron said:

Any experience using it on silicone?  A lot of products say they work but they're always full of shit

Silicone is pretty easy, you don't need that grade of remover. I got a can of "Acryl-safe Silicone Remover" from NAPA or similar and it worked fine. It's a lot of scrubbing but it takes it off.

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Thanks.  I'll try it.  The PO seems to have thought silicone was the best and only thing to use for sealing/bedding/gluing...you name it.  The guys at Industrial Plastics and Pain say to use 'Contractor's Solvent', but I haven't had much luck with it.

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I have always used strong detergents to remove silicone. There is no solvent that won’t also dissolve everything else. And, sure enough, the expensive Permatex Silicone remover is basically laundry detergent in a WD-40 base...except expensive...per the MSDS.

Requires rubbing, scraping, scrubbing pads, or wet sanding.

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Enough to re-bed with sika?  This is for a fresh water inspection port cover.

4 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Silicone is pretty easy, you don't need that grade of remover. I got a can of "Acryl-safe Silicone Remover" from NAPA or similar and it worked fine. It's a lot of scrubbing but it takes it off.

 

49 minutes ago, daddle said:

I have always used strong detergents to remove silicone. There is no solvent that won’t also dissolve everything else. And, sure enough, the expensive Permatex Silicone remover is basically laundry detergent in a WD-40 base...except expensive...per the MSDS.

Requires rubbing, scraping, scrubbing pads, or wet sanding.

 

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Have anyone tried Xylene. A friend of mine tested it with very good result even though sikaflex says that hard sikaflex can nnot be removed with any solvents. Haven't tested it myself though, but will within a week. It's pretty cheap and can be found in most paint stores as a thinner. 

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Most folks who make a living with thier hands avoid chemicals.

Electric Heat gun , metal scrapers, plastic scrapers, wire and fiber wheels ....are the typical tools 

by plastic scraper i mean something aggressive...a piece  plexiglass shaped to the suitable profile  then  sharpened to a chisel edge 

Sharpened auto window frost scrapers are very handy to have around 

 

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9 hours ago, cameron said:

Thanks.  I'll try it.  The PO seems to have thought silicone was the best and only thing to use for sealing/bedding/gluing...you name it.  The guys at Industrial Plastics and Pain say to use 'Contractor's Solvent', but I haven't had much luck with it.

I used to be one of those guys...and I agree that the CS really doesn't do much to silicone. Bulk removal with a plastic razor blade first makes the remainder easier to work with.

8 hours ago, cameron said:

Enough to re-bed with sika?  This is for a fresh water inspection port cover.

 

 

I hedged my bets when choosing a replacement sealant and settled on Life Seal. It's a polyurethane/silicone blend so it really doesn't care if there is a bit of silicone residue.

The other option is to use butyl tape, which doesn't depend on ultimate adhesion to work.

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Not sure what your project is  but boatbuilderss  avoid bedding compound...it takes very. Many man hours to clean up the joint .

a component like a Lewmar hatch would be seated on a gasket.  The gasket is made of two lines of weatherstrip type tape.

only the fasteners are bedded with sikaflex.   Very many components are sealed this way ...fast , waterproof and clean 

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From experience I will tell you that the Marine Formula DeBond works on sika awa silicone. There ain’t much in the world impresses me but I have been pleased with the Debond. Be sure to RTFM

 

zitski is not giving good info. Keep tidy by taping off the area. This isn’t rocket surgery.  Dow 795 and butyl both work well. See vid for VHB option  

 

 

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