• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
bhyde

Napa Fire

Recommended Posts

Crap. It's happening again.

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/2-big-wildfires-prompt-evacuations-in-Napa-County-12262945.php

Got to work this morning in Novato and the hills about two miles away are on fire. Even worse, the wind is starting to build from the west. Going to be a long day for our fire fighting friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just North of 37 near 101 (Black Point area). Not sure how the fire got that far south, but I'm looking at it right now. I hope this isn't arson, but there looks to be several fires going at the same time in different areas.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sister just called and has evac't to Petaluma from Sonoma. She didn't receive any notifications and as far as I can see only north of Santa Rosa do they have evac orders. Checking Goes16 for fire status. CDF fire reports haven't updated yet this morning. Windy as hell since yesterday with gust over 50 in places. I kept sayin to the wife yesterday I hope nobody does anything stupid. With the wind it could have been arcing wires or just about anything to get these going. Be safe out there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Guitar said:

Sister just called and has evac't to Petaluma from Sonoma. She didn't receive any notifications and as far as I can see only north of Santa Rosa do they have evac orders. Checking Goes16 for fire status. CDF fire reports haven't updated yet this morning. Windy as hell since yesterday with gust over 50 in places. I kept sayin to the wife yesterday I hope nobody does anything stupid. With the wind it could have been arcing wires or just about anything to get these going. Be safe out there. 

Here's the Goes16 from 3am.

Not good. Not sure If I'm see this correctly, but is there a fire going up at Clearlake too?

Drove by your neck of the woods last night from Truckee back to the bay area. Wind was north-west at "I'm glad I'm not sailing" speed.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, drove over the dam at Folsom and was shocked to not see anyone sailing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Atlas Fire
description
Firefighters are battling a 200 acre fire off of Altas Peak Rd, south of Lake Berryessa (Napa County). #AltasFire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tubbs Fire: Updated: October 09, 2017 7:33 am
County: Napa County  
Location: off of Hwy 128 and Bennett Ln, Calistoga  
Acres Burned - Containment: 20,000 acres  
Nuns Fire: Updated: October 09, 2017 7:33 am
County: Sonoma County  
Location: Hwy 12, north of Glen Ellen  
Acres Burned - Containment: 300 acres  
Patrick Fire: Updated: October 09, 2017 7:33 am
County: Napa County  
Location: off Patrick Rd, west of Napa  
Acres Burned - Containment: 100 acres  
Altas Fire: more info... Updated: October 09, 2017 5:57 am
County: Napa County  
Location: off of Altas Peak Rd, south of Lake Berryessa  
Acres Burned - Containment: 5,000 acres  
Evacuation Info: Napa County Sheriff Evacuation Information
Redwood Fire: Updated: October 09, 2017 7:22 am
County: Mendocino County  
Location: North of Hwy 20, west of Mendocino National Forest, south of Black Bart  
Acres Burned - Containment: 4,500 acres  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother just called me from Rohnert Park, he is under a mandatory evacuation order, was out of town last night, so all he has are the clothes he is wearing. Cell service is out in the area, call dropped out and haven't heard from him since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over 1500 structures burned so far. No containment on any of the fires yet. Emergency response is solely focused on preserving life. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If there is a Gawd

She can be a Real Fucking Jerk at times !!!!!

 

:mellow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New fire in Orange County. Pushed by Santa Ana winds and moving into Anaheim Hills. 91 freeway closed, 241 freeway closed. This will be a VERY bad fire. They are going to lose quite a few homes.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have family living in Geyserville and haven't been able to contact them - anybody know if it's in the crosshairs?

Seems like it might be northwest of the worst of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

We have family living in Geyserville and haven't been able to contact them - anybody know if it's in the crosshairs?

Seems like it might be northwest of the worst of it.

They are good to go.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sister is evac'd out of Santa Rosa.  Air is pretty bad in Windsor where she's staying.

Wind was gusting to 75 MPH this a.m.,  said it was calm now.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend lost his house in north Santa Rosa.  Lots of buildings and homes burned, on both sides of the 101 freeway.  This is huge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sis was allowed back into house to grab what they can.  Houses on ridge near Carriage Lane are gone.  Heavy smoke.

Long night ahead.

Scary to think a firestorm could run thru a city the size of Santa Rosa.  Damn winds are deadly out here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every week one thinks This is as Bad as It Could Get

knowing it Could always get Worse

But Fuck This Year !!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/10/09/santa-rosa-fire-how-a-sudden-firestorm-obliterated-a-city/

"This fire, which started in Calistoga, is being compared with the Valley Fire in 2015 in neighboring Lake County, which was considered one of the hottest and fastest in memory.

“We had 20,000 acres in 12 hours,” said Cal Fire Capt. Richard Cordova on Monday afternoon of the Tubbs fire. “It’s pretty much unheard of.”

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How the Fuck did this shit just Pop-Up ALL The Fuck Up and Down Kalifornia on the same weekend ??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn................

 I used to live out there..... I seem to remember the constant rain, not dry conditions.... But I do recall that Ukiah/ Willits had some bad fires, just east of the coastal range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

How the Fuck did this shit just Pop-Up ALL The Fuck Up and Down Kalifornia on the same weekend ??

Sunday night felt just like the weather of the Oakland fire.

Was on the city front, nice 10 knot westerly

came though raccoon straights and it was a 5 knot northerly, and went from about 65 degrees to 80. Was "hot" in Marina Bay with a northerly and a streak of smoke in the sky coming from the north. 

Santa Anas (to borrow a phrase from LA) are a fucking bastard. Was there some sort of coordinated arson? Maybe, but seems unlikely, unless they all waited for just the right time to start a conflagration. The newsies are saying biggest loss of life and property in one fire event in Cali history, which seems pretty amazing given most of the damage was done in 24 hours. But that's pretty pricey real-estate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talked 2 sis @ 1pm today.  Much of her neighborhood is gone.  Completly wiped out .  Somehow her house was still ok this morning.  Neighbors got together and went backway in, up the fairway of golf course, grabbed couple suitcases and split.  Heavy fire presence out front , she's praying the good guys make a stand and turn the beast back.   Sky is dark and they needed headlamps to get around

Weird thought that lingers with me is that with two generations of firemen in our family (our dad & grandfather) maybe all the good karma they spread to others will come around and save my sisters home.   Tough day for us .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Talked 2 sis @ 1pm today.  Much of her neighborhood is gone.  Completly wiped out .  Somehow her house was still ok this morning.  Neighbors got together and went backway in, up the fairway of golf course, grabbed couple suitcases and split.  Heavy fire presence out front , she's praying the good guys make a stand and turn the beast back.   Sky is dark and they needed headlamps to get around

Weird thought that lingers with me is that with two generations of firemen in our family (our dad & grandfather) maybe all the good karma they spread to others will come around and save my sisters home.   Tough day for us .

Where did your Dad and GP work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, White Lightnin' said:

Stolen from the  random pic thread...

 

WL

Fire-danger-level-holy-shit-today_zps3vkar140.jpg

Truth...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Where did your Dad and GP work?

Upstate NY.  Auburn FD.

Grandad interrupted his fire service run with a tour of Texas border with US Army. 

Father joined fire service in '39.  Enlisted USMC in '42 (3rd Amphib Tractor Batt)  Bronze Star @ Iwo Jima. Returned to Fire Service in '45 thru '57.

Dad then editor/publisher 'Fire Engineering' in NYC.  Moved to DC and ran IAFC(Inter.Assoc. Fire Chiefs).

Retired (sort of) from Fire Service in late mid '70's.

We're Irish New Yorkers.  Cops, firemen & soldiers.

 

Sorry for the sidetrack guys.

Having a tough time with my little sis seeing her life's work possibly go up in smoke a couple years short of retirement.

Nothing I can do or I'd be up there already.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the CEO of Murray Energy thinks that more regulations need to be gutted, and that climate change is a hoax, and that this is just a natural decades long cycle.... As he's gasping for air in the TV studio because he doesn't wan't anyone to see his oxygen tank...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Upstate NY.  Auburn FD.

Grandad interrupted his fire service run with a tour of Texas border with US Army. 

Father joined fire service in '39.  Enlisted USMC in '42 (3rd Amphib Tractor Batt)  Bronze Star @ Iwo Jima. Returned to Fire Service in '45 thru '57.

Dad then editor/publisher 'Fire Engineering' in NYC.  Moved to DC and ran IAFC(Inter.Assoc. Fire Chiefs).

Retired (sort of) from Fire Service in late mid '70's.

We're Irish New Yorkers.  Cops, firemen & soldiers.

 

Sorry for the sidetrack guys.

Having a tough time with my little sis seeing her life's work possibly go up in smoke a couple years short of retirement.

Nothing I can do or I'd be up there already.

 

As an ex firefighter, I can tell you, not much you could do up there right now except be in the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got a good look at the scene down near Novato/Petaluma and Sears Point yesterday on the drive home. Total fucking destruction. And it's only a minor portion of the fire area. It's going to take years for this shit to get cleaned up, the damage is unbelievable. As a home owner, and someone who has put a ton of work into my house over the last ten years, the idea of helplessly watching it burn to the ground is scaring the shit out of me. Everything from million dollar winery estates to trailer parks are completely gone. Seems like the fire fighters are still mostly in life saving mode getting people clear with little or no containment on many of the areas. To make things worse, the wind forecast for today is not good. This is ugly and getting uglier.

Props to the crews out battling the fires. Huge job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, bhyde said:

 

Props to the crews out battling the fires. Huge job.

+ 1

 

Sister/family in RV moving around - fire so big  no one sure where to go.  Chaos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps too early

Perhaps I missed it

But I have not picked up what the cause of ALL these fires was suspected to be

if just wind, sounds like it's Not being done correctly (power Grid)

seams to me we dad worse direr weather But maybe it just built up to this ???

UnFuckingBelieveable !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

Perhaps too early

Perhaps I missed it

But I have not picked up what the cause of ALL these fires was suspected to be

if just wind, sounds like it's Not being done correctly (power Grid)

seams to me we dad worse direr weather But maybe it just built up to this ???

UnFuckingBelieveable !!

So next ting I see is this :-O

 

PG&E power lines linked to Wine Country fires

  •  
  •  
  • Previous
  • A man walks past a fallen transformer along Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)
  • People walk past fallen transformer along Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)
  • Cables burn and drip material along Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)People walk past fallen transformer along Parker Hill Road in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)
PUBLISHED: October 10, 2017 at 6:31 pm | UPDATED: October 11, 2017 at 9:08 am

As the first reports came in Sunday night of numerous fires that would grow into one of the most destructive wildfire disasters in California history, emergency dispatchers in Sonoma County received multiple calls of power lines falling down and electrical transformers exploding.

 

Related Articles

In all, according to a review of emergency radio traffic by the Bay Area News Group, Sonoma County dispatchers sent out fire crews to at least 10 different locations across the county over a 90-minute period starting at 9:22 pm to respond to 911 calls and other reports of sparking wires and problems with the county’s electrical system amid high winds.

 

State fire officials said Tuesday that they are still investigating the cause of the blazes, which as of late Tuesday had killed 17 people and destroyed more than 2,000 homes in Sonoma, Napa and other Northern California counties.

PGE wildire

 

ADVERTISING

But the reports of the power equipment failures began to turn the spotlight on PG&E, the giant San Francisco-based utility, raising questions about how well it maintained its equipment in the area and whether it adequately cut back trees from power lines to reduce fire risk — as required by state law.

PG&E officials issued a statement Tuesday evening, acknowledging the equipment troubles even as a company spokesman called the questions about maintenance “highly speculative.”

“The historic wind event that swept across PG&E service area late Sunday and early Monday packed hurricane-strength winds in excess of 75 mph in some cases,” said PG&E spokesman Matt Nauman.

“These destructive winds, along with millions of trees weakened by years of drought and recent renewed vegetation growth from winter storms, all contributed to some trees, branches and debris impacting our electric lines across the North Bay,” he added. “In some cases, we have found instances of wires down, broken poles and impacted infrastructure. Where those have occurred, we have reported them to the CPUC and CalFire. Our thoughts are with all those individuals who were impacted by these devastating wildfires.”

 

PG&E and other large utilities in California have a long history of being found responsible for major wildfires because of inadequate maintenance of their power lines.

In April, the state Public Utilities Commission fined PG&E $8.3 million for failing to maintain a power line that sparked the Butte Fire in Amador County in September 2015. That fire burned for 22 days, killing two people, destroying 549 homes and charring 70,868 acres.

CalFire announced last year that it will seek to force PG&E to pay $90 million in firefighting costs. More than 1,000 lawsuits and claims are still pending against the utility.

“It was more than just a lack of maintenance. It was a complete disregard for their requirements of vegetation management in rural areas,” said Burlingame attorney Frank Pitre, who sued on behalf of the victims.

Pitre said his law firm has already started fielding questions from Sonoma County residents who said they saw transformers exploding and downed wires sparking in their neighborhoods before they went up in flames. They wondered if the utility would be held liable, he said.

“This is very definitely on people’s radar of what caused a number of fires to break out all at once,” Pitre said.

“If downed wires are deemed the cause of the fire,” he added, “PG&E could be strictly liable for the cost of damages.”

In 1994, PG&E was found guilty of 739 counts of negligence and fined nearly $30 million by state regulators when trees touched its high-voltage wires in Nevada County in the Sierra foothills, sparking a fire near the town of Rough and Ready that destroyed 12 homes and a 19th century schoolhouse. Afterward, prosecutors found that PG&E had diverted nearly $80 million from its tree-cutting programs into profits.

State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-Redwood City, said he sees similarities in PG&E’s problems with maintaining its power lines to the utility’s failures to properly maintain its natural gas lines that led to the 2010 San Bruno explosion that killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes. PG&E was fined $1.6 billion by the PUC, and a federal jury last year convicted the company on five charges of violating federal pipeline safety regulations and one charge of obstructing an official National Transportation Safety Board probe into the blast.

“If it turns out that PG&E is responsible for this fire and negligent for not putting in the resources or for diverting the resources,” Hill said, “then I will be the first one to stand up and say we need to dissolve PG&E as a private company and form a public utility. We would not have the confidence or trust in them in the future. Nor should we.”

The home of Tom Welch on Holly Park Way in the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa was destroyed in the Tubbs Fire that incinerated the city and many inner neighborhoods. Welch told his family to flee while he stayed behind to assist in evacuation and firefighting efforts. (Courtesy of Tom Welch) The home of Tom Welch on Holly Park Way in the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa was destroyed in the Tubbs Fire that incinerated parts of the city. Welch told his family to flee while he stayed behind to assist in evacuation and firefighting efforts. (Photo: Tom Welch) 

Officials for the PUC did not provide a safety official to answer questions Tuesday about the wine country fires, or PG&E’s records in maintaining its power lines and tree-trimming responsibilities.

“It may take some time for fire officials or utilities to determine the possible cause of the fires,” said Terrie Prosper, a spokeswoman for the PUC, which regulates big power companies such as PG&E. “Once that occurs, if it appears that a utility line may have been involved, the PUC will investigate.”

For multiple fires to all start around the same time in the middle of the night, lightning or arson could also have been a cause. But Ken Pimlott, chief of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, ruled out lightning at a news conference on Tuesday.

Pimlott did, however, note the high winds.

“When we have a wind event like this — 50 mph winds bearing down on areas — every fire that starts has a significant potential to grow into a large fire very quickly,” he said.

According to Sonoma County fire radio traffic, after the first vegetation fire at 310 Buckingham Drive in the heart of Santa Rosa was reported at 9:22 p.m. Sunday, an electrical call went out seconds later at 1047 Maverick Court about 10 miles north. The next minute firefighters were sent to a “possible transformer explosion” at Fulton Road at Old Redwood Highway more than two miles west.

By 9:25 p.m., trees began falling at Ida Clayton Road in Calistoga, about 17 miles north.
The downed power lines and trees continued as firefighters raced to a rapidly increasing number of structure and vegetation fires.

Not only did arcing wires and transformer problems potentially spark new fires, quickly spread by fierce winds, the downed trees blocked firefighters and emergency personnel from responding quickly. At about 9:52 p.m., a firefighter reported that Highway 128, in the center of the battle to contain the flames, was completely blocked by trees and branches. And Highway 101 access through the heart of Santa Rosa was shut down because of downed wires.

Frank Wolak, a professor of economics and an energy expert at Stanford University, said if PG&E’s lines are responsible, there will be a vigorous debate in front of the PUC about financial liability.

“My guess is that they will say no one expected the winds to be this strong for that long,” Wolak said. “If the PUC buys their story, then they aren’t liable. But if the PUC finds they were negligent, then they could have liability and penalties. If I were PG&E, I’d be very hopeful that I’d done everything the PUC had told me to do up there.”

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were the stories about arson just speculation or was there some actual evidence?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Were the stories about arson just speculation or was there some actual evidence?

I would NOT be suprised if we are not being let in on what has happned

for our own good <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
North Bay Wildfires Archive
 

California Fire Experts to Probe Why 17 Fires Erupted in Just 24 Hours

One expert said falling power lines and arson are being considered as causes

By Noreen O'Donnell

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1:09
/
2:14
 
Share
 
 
A World War II veteran and his wife were unable to make it out of their Napa home before it was engulfed in flames Sunday, killing them. Jodi Hernandez reports. (Published Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017)
Mobile_Home_Park_Destroyed.jpg

North Bay Fires Destroy Mobile Home Park in Santa Rosa

 
Homes_Burned_in_Coffee_Park_Neighborhood.jpg

Raging Fire Burns Homes in Santa Rosa

 
Mobile_Home_Park_Destroyed_by_Wildfire.jpg

Fire Destroys Santa Rosa Mobile Home Park

 
San_Jose_Police_Investigate_Shooting_at_Strip_Mall.jpg

San Jose Police Investigate Shooting at Strip Mall

 
10-10-17-NAPA-FIRE-IMAGE8.jpg

California Fire Experts to Probe Why 17 Fires Erupted in Just 24...

 
Now Playing
sonomameeting1010_368319.JPG

Firefighters, Elected Officials Try to Reassure Evacuees

 
Up Next
Douglas+Thron+Wildfire+Drone+Video.jpg

Drone Footage Captures Santa Rosa Areas Leveled by Fire

 
FOUNTAINGROVE_AND_COFFEY_PARK_TIMELAPSES_1200x675_1068885571897.jpg

Time Lapse Video of Destroyed Santa Rosa Neighborhood

 
SMARTThumb.JPG

RAW: Widespread Devastation as Seen From SMART Train

 
ChopperFire_344727.JPEG

RAW: Aerial Footage Depicts Scope of North Bay Fires

 
NorCal_Inferno__Death_Toll_Rises_as_Fires_Continue_March.jpg

NorCal Inferno Death Toll Rises as Fires Continue March

 
KNTV_100000000508700_1200x675_1066490435527.jpg

RAW VIDEO: Fast-Moving Wildfire Rages in Napa

 
SRfirenight1009_353264.JPG

Destructive, Deadly Fires Continue to Spread Across North Bay

 
0097-NAPA-FIRE-WINE-V1_1200x675_1069070403626.jpg

Wineries Affected by the North Bay Wildfires

 
GettyImages-859498392_master.jpg

'Heartbroken': Smoke, Wildfires Damage California's Famed Wine...

 
10-10-17-NAPA-FIRE-IMAGE7.jpg

Death Toll Rises as North Bay Fires Spread

 
North_Bay_Fires_Town_of_Glen_Ellen_on_Edge.jpg

North Bay Fires: Town of Glen Ellen on Edge

 
Fire_Spreads_to_Oakmont_Golf_Club.jpg

Wildfire Spreads to Oakmont Golf Club

 
Journey_s_End_Trailer_Park_in_Ruins.jpg

Santa Rosa Trailer Park in Ruins After Wildfire

 
Atlas_Fire_in_Napa_Now_Burning_into_Solano_County.jpg

Atlas Fire in Napa Now Burning into Solano County

 
Fire_Guts_More_Than_50_Percent_of_Cardinal_Newman_High_Schoo.jpg

Fire Guts More Than 50 Percent of Cardinal Newman High Schoo

 
Dramatic_Before_and_After_Images_From_the_Wildfire.jpg

Dramatic Before and After Images From the Wildfire

 
air-qualty.jpg

North Bay Fires: Health Officials Issue Smoke Advisory

 
Signorello_Winery_Destroyed.jpg

Signorello Winery Destroyed

 
KENWOODFIREPIC3_342702.JPEG

Residents Flee Homes as Wildfires Torch North Bay

 
Mark_West_Estates_Devestated.jpg

West Estates Devastated By Wildfires

 
Devastation_at_Coffee_Park.jpg

North Bay Wildfires: Devastation at Coffey Park

 
Crystal_Court_Neighborhood_Ravaged_By_Wildfire.jpg

Crystal Court Neighborhood Ravaged by Wildfire

 
Crosswalk_Community_Church_in_Napa_Takes_in_Evacuees.jpg

Fire Evacuees Arrive at Napa Church

 
firephoto.png

Wildfires Burning Across Northern California

 
napa+wildfire.JPG

Peninsula Crews Travel to North Bay to Fight Fires

 
Mobile_Home_Park_Destroyed.jpg

North Bay Fires Destroy Mobile Home Park in Santa Rosa

 
Homes_Burned_in_Coffee_Park_Neighborhood.jpg

Raging Fire Burns Homes in Santa Rosa

 
Mobile_Home_Park_Destroyed_by_Wildfire.jpg

Fire Destroys Santa Rosa Mobile Home Park

 
San_Jose_Police_Investigate_Shooting_at_Strip_Mall.jpg

San Jose Police Investigate Shooting at Strip Mall

 
10-10-17-NAPA-FIRE-IMAGE8.jpg

California Fire Experts to Probe Why 17 Fires Erupted in Just 24...

 
Now Playing
sonomameeting1010_368319.JPG

Firefighters, Elected Officials Try to Reassure Evacuees

 
Up Next
Douglas+Thron+Wildfire+Drone+Video.jpg

Drone Footage Captures Santa Rosa Areas Leveled by Fire

 
FOUNTAINGROVE_AND_COFFEY_PARK_TIMELAPSES_1200x675_1068885571897.jpg

Time Lapse Video of Destroyed Santa Rosa Neighborhood

 
 
 

The deadly fires sweeping across California wine country were driven by 50-mph winds, but the reason that so many blazes erupted at once is under investigation, the chairman of the state Board of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

The speed with which 17 blazes moved through Napa, Sonoma and other Northern California counties took residents and even firefighters by surprise Sunday night into Monday morning, as people evacuated suddenly in the early hours. By Wednesday, at least 18 people had been killed and more than 100 treated for fire-related injuries.

“Why we had so many big fires, the investigation will give some indication on that,” J. Keith Gilless, dean of the College of Natural Resources at the University of California, Berkeley said on Tuesday.

Scott L. Stephens, a professor in the College of Natural Resources, said that falling power lines and arson are both being considered. All of the fires seemed to ignite between midnight and 2 a.m. Monday, when winds were the strongest, he said. Branches or trees could have fallen on the lines or the lines themselves failed, he said.

Time Lapse Video of Destroyed Santa Rosa Neighborhood

 
 
[BAY] Time Lapse Video of Destroyed Santa Rosa Neighborhood
This time lapse video shows the devastation left behind by the wildfires that tore through the Fountaingrove and Coffey Park neighborhoods.
(Published Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017)

“And the other one is arson of course, and I know that’s being looked at too,” he said.

In April, the San Francisco-based Pacific Gas and Electric Co. was fined $8.3 million for failing to maintain a power line that sparked a massive fire in Northern California in 2015, The Associated Press reported. The California Public Utilities Commission levied the fine for poor tree maintenance by the utility and its contractors and for its failure to report that one of its power lines might have started the Butte Fire in September 2015. An investigation by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, found that the fire was ignited by a gray pine tree that slumped onto a line.

After the current wildfires broke out, The Mercury News found that Sonoma County dispatchers sent fire crews to at least 10 locations for sparking wires, exploding electrical transformers, fallen power lines and other electrical problems in Sunday night's high winds. The Bay Area News Group, of which it is part, reviewed emergency calls over a 90-minute period starting at 9:22 p.m. Sunday.

PG&E acknowledged problems with its electric lines but told the news group in a statement that questions about maintenance were “highly speculative.” 

“These destructive winds, along with millions of trees weakened by years of drought and recent renewed vegetation growth from winter storms, all contributed to some trees, branches and debris impacting our electric lines across the North Bay,” a spokesman, Matt Naumann, said. “In some cases, we have found instances of wires down, broken poles and impacted infrastructure. Where those have occurred, we have reported them to the CPUC and CalFire.” 

Gilless said that Sunday's weather — high winds, high temperatures and low relative humidity — was conducive for the fires, which have destroyed more than 2,000 homes and businesses.

Destructive, Deadly Fires Continue to Spread Across North Bay

 
 
[BAY] Destructive, Deadly Fires Continue to Spread Across North Bay
Destructive and deadly wildfires in the North Bay continued to burn out of control Monday night and into Tuesday morning, sending more people fleeing their homes and still others on edge, preparing their potential escape.
(Published Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017)

“And of course it became far worse than just bad; it became catastrophic,” he said.

Firefighters were struggling to contain the firestorm amid continued strong winds. The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning, signalling critical conditions, for the North Bay mountains and East Bay hills that is in effect from Wednesday afternoon through Thursday afternoon. 

The worst fires in Northern California typically strike in October. Twenty-five years ago, the October 1991 Tunnel fire in the Oakland hills left 25 dead.

This week's high winds threw lots of embers in front of the large fires, creating many smaller ones, Gilless said. The vegetation of brush, grass and trees added to the hazard, unlike a redwood forest, which is moister and protected from the winds.

“We’ve had this phenomenon a couple of times recently and not far from there,” he said.

The Jerusalem and Valley fires in Lake County in Northern California in 2015 surprised firefighters with how quickly they spread, he said.

Gilless said that the 50-mph gusts meant that firefighters had been focused on public safety rather than fire suppression.

Published at 3:23 PM PDT on Oct 10, 2017 | Updated 17 minutes ago



Source: California Fire Experts to Probe Why 17 Fires Erupted in Just 24 Hours - NBC Bay Areahttp://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/California-Fire-Experts-Probe-Cause-of-Fast-Moving-Fires-450303083.html?_osource=SocialFlowFB_BAYBrand#ixzz4vE4nzxse 
Follow us: @NBCBayArea on Twitter | NBCBayArea on Facebook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Were the stories about arson just speculation or was there some actual evidence?

No clue yet. They're too busy dealing with getting people out and searching for the missing. From What I've read and heard they will start looking for causes once everything is contained and/or controlled.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOODY!

Cut it out... anyone that wants to find photos or news can Google for it.

Or... simply turn on the TV.

You fucking up the bandwidth.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You think that after all these years of being here he would have figured that out .

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like we underinvested in power line infrastructure. Fucking tragic...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

FEMA gonna need a bigger boat...

Cali didn't vote for Trump. Don't be looking for help there...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Cali didn't vote for Trump. Don't be looking for help there...

Hmmmmmmmmmm................ Neither did PR..... I'm seeing FEMA guys all over the place around here, even though it was just a bad storm in this area....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Hmmmmmmmmmm................ Neither did PR..... I'm seeing FEMA guys all over the place around here, even though it was just a bad storm in this area....

How many did you see in PR or California? Hmmmmm...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

Cali didn't vote for Trump. Don't be looking for help there...

GoonMoonBeam just signed Kalifornia Sanctuary State Status into Law

We'll be lucky to get Fed Tax Refund Checks

Might need Passport to enter AZ & NV

OR might not care ???????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked to stay at that Hilton  that burned down when visiting. I imagine hotel rooms are going to be expensive if you can get one within a couple hours drive because of all the homeless people. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The air is quite toxic. No one wants to cause a panic.

2:30 p.m. San Francisco air quality warning: Air in San Francisco has been designated “unhealthy for sensitive groups.” Air in parts of the North Bay fire zone has been designated “hazardous” and “very unhealthy.” San Francisco air quality is predicted to decrease on Thursday to “unhealthy” for all. The San Francisco Main Library and the Chinatown, Mission Bay and Glen Park branches are open as shelters with filtered air, Mayor Ed Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are these fires the new way of terrorists causing mayhem, death and destruction.  Surely 17 fires in a short period of time points to a coordinated effort by some people and not just a few idiots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Bloody Chum said:

There have been a few nut jobs over the years but I've never seen one start this many at once.

there are plenty of Nut Farms around these days

I'm afraid anything not yet Nut Proof ...........................................................................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They'll certainly take a look at any evidence of coordinated efforts, but we've had years like this before...from the number of fires perspective....fire behavior is getting worse because of a variety of factors but from the perspective of just number of fires and acres burned, its not "off the chart" for a bad year yet. Not even close.

2007 was a pretty busy year as I recall - especially late October (in fact the period 2007-2009 was pretty active).

Attached file is the "Large Fire Report" for 2007. The link below is the "Siege Report".

http://www.fire.ca.gov/fire_protection/downloads/siege/2007/Overview_CompleteFinal.pdf

incidentstatsevents_167.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, trt131 said:

Are these fires the new way of terrorists causing mayhem, death and destruction.  Surely 17 fires in a short period of time points to a coordinated effort by some people and not just a few idiots.

PG&E. Homegrown corporate terror...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Raz'r said:

PG&E. Homegrown corporate terror...

is it confirmed that power lines were the culprit? the footage sure is reminiscent of the crestmoor neighborhood, just a much larger scale and a different ignition source. on another note, my entire field crew has been provided with n-95 masks for "continuous use" as directed by our safety manager based on the baaqmd alert last night... particulate's are falling here in the so. bay

keep an eye on your email razr, jp could very well be cancelled this week unless air quality has a drastic improvement.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning update:

The Southern LNU Complex is being managed in Unified Command by CAL FIRE Incident Management Team 3 and the Napa County Sheriff’s Department. The complex consists of the Atlas, Nuns, Abobe, Norrbom, Pressley and Partrick Fires. The Nuns and Norrbom fires converged together last night. A Red Flag Warning remains in effect for the region. Additional resources continue to arrive from across the state and neighboring states to assist in Firefighting efforts. Acreage for each of the fires are as follows: Atlas: 43762 acres 3% containment Adobe: 7955 acres 1% containment Partrick: 10817 acres 2% containment Pressley: 473 acres 1% containment Nuns/Norrbom: 14698 acres 3% containment

Air has cleared so we can expect to see air attack on it today which should bring some good results. Major reason for this fire to get so big was smoke was too heavy to fly the big boys. Horrible. As like most, really wish I could physically help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the first fire I've ever noticed to devastate a basically suburban neighborhood.  When we get ours, my wife is usually concerned for my moms house and I explain knowingly, naw, it's in the middle of the valley far from brush interface.  Now I just see a shitload of big mature trees that would serve just fine to take out the entire SFV. Damn. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know if it's related

or price gauging 

But in DAGO

Two Buck Chuck

is now 

Three Bucks :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Owen said:

This is the first fire I've ever noticed to devastate a basically suburban neighborhood.  When we get ours, my wife is usually concerned for my moms house and I explain knowingly, naw, it's in the middle of the valley far from brush interface.  Now I just see a shitload of big mature trees that would serve just fine to take out the entire SFV. Damn. 

Our neighborhood is 3 streets away from a completely overgrown canyon. Old dead bay and oak trees, brush, etc.  The hood is more fire safe now than, say 10 years ago as older, mature fir trees have been taken out, but we have a lot of coastal live oak. I'm looking at the trees in the yard, and I have one oak that's probably close enough to the house to cause a problem.  of more concern is the neighbors overgrown oak and eucalyptus, that all touch her house, and the fact that she has a 3' setback on her side, and we've only got 7' on our side, so if her house goes, it's probably close enough that ours would go as well.

 

As to the cause, the PG&E thing is my speculation only.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Our neighborhood is 3 streets away from a completely overgrown canyon. Old dead bay and oak trees, brush, etc.  The hood is more fire safe now than, say 10 years ago as older, mature fir trees have been taken out, but we have a lot of coastal live oak. I'm looking at the trees in the yard, and I have one oak that's probably close enough to the house to cause a problem.  of more concern is the neighbors overgrown oak and eucalyptus, that all touch her house, and the fact that she has a 3' setback on her side, and we've only got 7' on our side, so if her house goes, it's probably close enough that ours would go as well.

 

As to the cause, the PG&E thing is my speculation only.

There are things you can do to vastly improve your chances that your house will do okay even if hers doesn’t. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Owen said:

This is the first fire I've ever noticed to devastate a basically suburban neighborhood.  When we get ours, my wife is usually concerned for my moms house and I explain knowingly, naw, it's in the middle of the valley far from brush interface.  Now I just see a shitload of big mature trees that would serve just fine to take out the entire SFV. Damn. 

Gee....I can’t think of very many that didn’t. Laguna, Oakland Hills, Cedar.......many more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The media will always spin a story to their best advantage. Those that have done any firefighting can list the history of big fires. Whether wildland or structural. We remember those times. The media runs around like a chicken with its head cut off every chance they get, screaming that the sky is falling.

This is not to diminish the tragedy of lives lost, or of homes and businesses destroyed. The boys and girls have their work cut out for them roping this all in. Praying for them and all involved.

 

WL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I was thinking more of the relatively flat, straddling-a-four lane-highway scenario.   Versus Oakland Hills, Laguna Canyons, Scripps ranch rolling eucalyptus hills...  That's all. Map of Santa Rosa, CA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Owen said:

Guess I was thinking more of the relatively flat, straddling-a-four lane-highway scenario.   Versus Oakland Hills, Laguna Canyons, Scripps ranch rolling eucalyptus hills...  That's all. Map of Santa Rosa, CA

Understood, but other than the Oakland Hills Fire, I could list many...that like this fire, came down out of the vegetation (burning downhill) and moved into flatter more suburban areas. Topography is an important factor but far from the only factor contributing to fire spread. Humidity, temperature, fuel moisture and fuel load, and wind.....especially wind. Fire loves to romp uphill and take those homes you classically see on the news perched on hillsides, but it often moves into flat suburban areas that have receptive fuels....wood fences, decks, palm trees, larger deciduous and coniferous trees in close proximity to homes that have construction weaknesses that are favorable to ignition from embers. Once you get a couple houses going, if you have a big wind I have seen the fire jump street to street amazingly fast. Thats a lot of BTU's and embers being pushed along. I've been to fires where the fire moves into the houses in a suburban neighborhood and although the vegetation along the interface is now consumed and the fire has moved along.......its takes hours and hours to stop the progress through the houses clustered close together like most neighborhoods, sometimes a good day or so. Fire is long gone and you're still fighting fire house to house trying to get ahead of it. Pull that Santa Rosa area up on Google Earth and look at the proximity to vegetation and the vegetation scattered through the city and in the worse hit neighborhoods. Plenty of fuel corridors to carry fire into the city.

If you're interested, google something like "10 worst fires in California history" or some such search string, pull up the fire perimeter maps and see that in almost every case there are areas somewhere on the perimeter where the fire moved out of the vegetation into relatively flat neighborhoods and took some number of houses. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Understood, but other than the Oakland Hills Fire, I could list many...that like this fire, came down out of the vegetation (burning downhill) and moved into flatter more suburban areas. Topography is an important factor but far from the only factor contributing to fire spread. Humidity, temperature, fuel moisture and fuel load, and wind.....especially wind. Fire loves to romp uphill and take those homes you classically see on the news perched on hillsides, but it often moves into flat suburban areas that have receptive fuels....wood fences, decks, palm trees, larger deciduous and coniferous trees in close proximity to homes that have construction weaknesses that are favorable to ignition from embers. Once you get a couple houses going, if you have a big wind I have seen the fire jump street to street amazingly fast. Thats a lot of BTU's and embers being pushed along. I've been to fires where the fire moves into the houses in a suburban neighborhood and although the vegetation along the interface is now consumed and the fire has moved along.......its takes hours and hours to stop the progress through the houses clustered close together like most neighborhoods, sometimes a good day or so. Fire is long gone and you're still fighting fire house to house trying to get ahead of it. Pull that Santa Rosa area up on Google Earth and look at the proximity to vegetation and the vegetation scattered through the city and in the worse hit neighborhoods. Plenty of fuel corridors to carry fire into the city.

If you're interested, google something like "10 worst fires in California history" or some such search string, pull up the fire perimeter maps and see that in almost every case there are areas somewhere on the perimeter where the fire moved out of the vegetation into relatively flat neighborhoods and took some number of houses. 

There were several descriptions of "golf ball" sized embers being driven by the 40 mph winds Sunday night and Monday morning... they could have been actual golf balls considering all the golf courses in the area. Something that size has plenty of fuel to start another fire before it consumes itself. I guess we should be glad there aren't many bowling alleys around...

Maybe the devil was playing 18 holes.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, familysailor said:

There were several descriptions of "golf ball" sized embers being driven by the 40 mph winds Sunday night and Monday morning... they could have been actual golf balls considering all the golf courses in the area. Something that size has plenty of fuel to start another fire before it consumes itself. I guess we should be glad there aren't many bowling alleys around...

Maybe the devil was playing 18 holes.

 

or OJ looking for the .............................................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sister's house is less than 2 miles from the nearest fire line, but it is also one of the most active.  N. Sonoma. She got called into work (county worker / water) just to answer phones even though she is in the evac zone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Guitar said:

My sister's house is less than 2 miles from the nearest fire line, but it is also one of the most active.  N. Sonoma. She got called into work (county worker / water) just to answer phones even though she is in the evac zone.

Got a bunch of people in Napa I work with that are pretty worried too. The Atlas and Patrick fires have downtown Napa pretty well surrounded. Any wind direction other than pure north/south is going to cause problems. Luckily the winds are pretty light right now.  Hopefully that will give the FF'er time to get ahead and maybe get some rest. If anyone know a good rain dance, now's the time.

Guitar, just out of curiosity, how much defensible zone do you have around your place? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Point Break said:

Understood,  [ knowledge and experience with clear explanation ] ... 

Gotcha.  Thanks for sharing and I hope things don't get too much worse up there.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man I am with you in that sentiment. Unfortunately, with the weather predictions I've seen, I think things are not going to get better soon. I think there are more painful losses to come. I know many people up there both in the firefighting community and in the wine industry. I am simply sick for them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

would a sacrificial housing firebreak/clearing be a valid option 

no so far away as to be missed if the wind shifted But somehow just ahead of the frontline

or chop all the trees ahead ??

I guess its the wind making a Blowtorch out of the fire 

pulled that out my ass But something must be done 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fire creates it's own weather. It makes it's own wind, and can drive other weather patterns off course by  it's convection.

I'm not sure that the bombing of Dresden, in WWII would have been as completely catastrophic as it was if the weather had been different, but as it was, Dresden made it's own weather pattern.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not just Dresden - there were lots of firestorms created in WW II - Hamburg, Tokyo etc.

Horizontal fire using up all the oxygen while the wind it created sucked people into it - incomprehensible.

Like a hurricane of fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s pretty impressive when you have wind in your face as the fire front approaches and suddenly at some point the fire is sucking the wind and it reverses 180 to blowing into the fire from your back. If I’m doing structure protection and I know where everybody is that’s when I put fire on the ground quickly to give me a little black between the fire and the structures. It’s a little dicier if your doing perimeter control......harder to control the fire you put on the ground. Bad things can happen.....

BTW - much less effective in the Nor Cal typical oak overstory and brush understory.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, my sis has been told her house is still intact - surrounded by many that were burnt down.  

Area is closed till Sunday at least.  She's had enough & heading down to Oakland for a break.

Air quality better today as sky cleared and a northerly breeze fillled in.   Next 3-4 days look bad as Red Flag warnings are in effect.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad thinking about the Pet's (livestock?) left at home when owners who were gone, can't go back for "Any reason" :unsure::mellow::(:(:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never understood why people drive away and leave their dogs.........cats..yes,  but dogs? On balance, horse people NEVER leave their horses behind. I’ve never seen it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It happened some here this summer - they had to evac on the spot so no chance to set up a trailer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not saying it may never happen.....but I’ve never seen it anywhere is the western US. Rather than leave their horses, they always stay. It’s also amazing how much they help each other. Horse trailers come from everywhere........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, bhyde said:

Got a bunch of people in Napa I work with that are pretty worried too. The Atlas and Patrick fires have downtown Napa pretty well surrounded. Any wind direction other than pure north/south is going to cause problems. Luckily the winds are pretty light right now.  Hopefully that will give the FF'er time to get ahead and maybe get some rest. If anyone know a good rain dance, now's the time.

Guitar, just out of curiosity, how much defensible zone do you have around your place? 

Steel roof and currently re-siding with hardyboard. I mow the natural grass down to 1 inch and only have one oak near the house. Also keep my oak branches trimed up about 8 feet even though I know it should be higher. I was looking at the canopy of oaks in the canyon below and just mentioned to the wife, under the right conditions they would burn like grasslands. Only if we had crowning would we be in danger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Guitar said:

Steel roof and currently re-siding with hardyboard. I mow the natural grass down to 1 inch and only have one oak near the house. Also keep my oak branches trimed up about 8 feet even though I know it should be higher. I was looking at the canopy of oaks in the canyon below and just mentioned to the wife, under the right conditions they would burn like grasslands. Only if we had crowning would we be in danger.

If you’re keeping the grass that low, 8’ is plenty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Point Break said:

If you’re keeping the grass that low, 8’ is plenty.

@ how many mph ??

of note I would leave food out to attract Raccoons before evacuating 

Fucking Evil Bastards !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Point Break said:

Never understood why people drive away and leave their dogs.........cats..yes,  but dogs? On balance, horse people NEVER leave their horses behind. I’ve never seen it. 

I remember one fire when they were readying Tipi Hedren's big cats for evacuation.  Can't recall if they did have to leave (think that's out in Acton?) but logistically speaking moving lions & tigers has to be a monumental task in front of a fire.

Biked by that a few yrs ago and there were a lot of cats out on the roofs lazying about.

Horse people always get it done fast around the canyons.   They work together impressively well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites