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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
BrickTopHarry

Ramming Speed! Tall Ship Docking Adventures

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So apparently a docking line fouled one or both props with the resulting yacht ping-pong before the situation was controlled and the ship successfully moved to its new dock.  Anything obvious that could have been done differently, once the fouling occurred, that could have avoided some of the carnage?

https://www.claimsjournal.com/news/east/2017/10/18/281166.htm

http://wpri.com/2017/10/16/tall-ship-oliver-hazard-perry-runs-aground-in-newport/

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3 hours ago, Marty6 said:

Put a even bigger flag up

yup bigger flag and go "ARRRRRRRRRRRRRrrrrrrrrr" a lot and keep a record of hits......certain with a little effort he could have walloped a whole bunch more

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3 hours ago, BrickTopHarry said:

Anything obvious that could have been done differently,

Absolutely... loaded snd rolled out all the portside canon and in unison fired and kept firing until clear. Added benefit is that would have vapourised the evidence, the  pesky camera guy and all witnesses.

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What is wrong with the dumb bint in the pink shirt?

How about you start up that floating caravan and GTF out of the way rather than screaming into the wind and waiting for the inevitable?

 

(I s'pose it is expecting too much for the other people on the dock to pull that poor wooden yacht forward and avoid those expensive crunchy noises.)

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Pretty freaky to watch the bowsprit twang the rig of Intrepid. Had the hull made contact with her it would have been game over for a wood 12M

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the chicka on the motorboat .....perhaps if she had a clue that they weren;t doing this on purpose she would have been more level headed....perhaps not...

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no sound signals indicating distress? did they think they had it under control?

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They did have it under control. Only a couple of minor scratches on the Hazard thanks to the precise use of yachts as fenders. It could have been a much bigger scratch.

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Big boats around little boats are always dangerous when things go wrong...

An this is just her wake...

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1 hour ago, dacapo said:

the chicka on the motorboat .....perhaps if she had a clue that they weren;t doing this on purpose she would have been more level headed....perhaps not...

Nothing 5 gallons of gas and a match can't fix

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10 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Absolutely... loaded snd rolled out all the portside canon and in unison fired and kept firing until clear. Added benefit is that would have vapourised the evidence, the  pesky camera guy and all witnesses.

Leaning into the situation and going full pirate never occured to me.  They could have seized motor yacht lady’s dog and pressed it into service as a deck dog for the Perry.

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Questionable decision to get underway in moderate crosswinds in a tight space in the first place.

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Why are people who film these things with their phones so silly.  Honestly it is not that hard.  

Get a grip on yourself camera person.  Either put down your phone and help, or at least spare the world your commentary and panic.  Drama major perhaps?

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According to local News 10 report two dock lines wrapped around both props. With a professional crew of 12 aboard?  Really? 

Putting Engine in Gear 101...make sure all lines are aboard and clear.

Geeez or is that Grrrr.

I hear there is a job opening for a Captain's position.

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1 hour ago, jesposito said:

Nothing 5 gallons of gas and a match can't fix

that's waste of 4 gallons...just need 1 gal.

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Anybody ever hear of an anchor?  Promptly deployed when first lost control of engines might have helped mitigate the shenanigans...repeated 5 blasts of the ships whistle wouldn't have hurt either.  

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2 hours ago, jesposito said:

Nothing 5 gallons of gas and a match can't fix

That was her response to getting yelled at by her incompetent husband who has been screaming at her all summer to tie the stupid rope like I told you a hundred times before.

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Dropping those anchors takes a bit of work and time, (typically there's only 1 primary that would have held it IF the water wasn't too deep for it to catch) and they'd need room for it to catch and the boat would have still swung with the breeze meaning the lady in pink was screwed no matter what she did, (great Jersey scream by the way, ugg! bet she doesn't even know where the ignition switch is...).  Having sailed on one of those boats I've experienced the mostly manual processes from back in the day that we all take for granted today. Nothing happens fast and/or requires less than 4 people to do.. There was no margin for error in that situation...

 

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5 minutes ago, BarnacleBillTheSailor said:

Wow.  That broad from Pawtucket on the motorboat; now that's a class act!

That's what I thought. She cleaned up her mouth for the tv interview. Her reaction was like standing at the front door with a vodka and PallMall and screaming "WTF are you thinking" at the tornado as it hits the house.

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56 minutes ago, Crash said:

Anybody ever hear of an anchor?  Promptly deployed when first lost control of engines might have helped mitigate the shenanigans...repeated 5 blasts of the ships whistle wouldn't have hurt either.  

That was my first thought but in the news article it stated that two anchors were deployed so I dropped the comment.  Not sure if that is correct but given the very close quarters it's unlikely that the anchors would have prevented impact.

I spent two terms (about 9 months) as Captain of the Californian, a 145 foot square topsail schooner back in the 1990's. We had a single engine and no bow thruster so I had to be VERY conservative in close quarters maneuvers. On the Californian I would have not have  left the dock in a 25 knot crosswind in such a tight fairway, actually it would have been unlikely she would have sprung off the dock in 25 knots on the beam.  We used to keep one anchor ready to run in harbor but even that would have been little use as it take more than a couple of boat lengths to grab and the video showed about one and a half boat lengths from "almost" ramming Intrepid to the stern impacting the motorsailer.

IMHO a bad decision to leave the dock cascaded into collision and probably a new Captain onboard.

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I never got it why so many people like these movie prop motor boats with added decorative square rigs. Best they can do is being blown ddw bow first with the sails up. What they usually do is being blown ddw sideways with the sails down - as seen here... Square rigers my arrrse! (In the video it looked like at least the port prop was still running. Forward and reverse. Maybe somebody just underestimated his windage?)

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6 minutes ago, 10thTonner said:

I never got it why so many people like these movie prop motor boats with added decorative square rigs.

Same reason Rimas has FB fans/adorers/enablers--they don't have a clue about boats or the ocean but find the notion "romantic" and harkening to a time when things were "better."

Don't get me started on how lame playing pirates is! To be authentic, all you need is a cowboy bandana on your head, be shit-faced drunk, and say, "Arrrrgh!" until everyone wants to kill you.

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Pretty good breeze out of the southwest pushing that steel hulled behemoth a pretty good rate - with that much windage I'm not certain they how quickly they could have turned even if they did have both props working. Boat never should've been in that part of the harbor.

As for the boats on the docks and why they didn't get out of the way, well, it's awful hard to get off the dock sideways straight into the breeze with boats fore & aft. Takes some time and careful progress. The lady on the powerboat could have backed out of there but by the time she realized what the heck was going on it was probably too late.

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8 minutes ago, Parma said:

The lady on the powerboat could have backed out of there but by the time she realized what the heck was going on it was probably too late.

Look at her and listen to her: it's always too late with her type. My guess is that she has a lawyer on retainer for whenever she decides to play the divorce card.

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52 minutes ago, sailronin said:

That was my first thought but in the news article it stated that two anchors were deployed so I dropped the comment.  Not sure if that is correct but given the very close quarters it's unlikely that the anchors would have prevented impact.

I spent two terms (about 9 months) as Captain of the Californian, a 145 foot square topsail schooner back in the 1990's. We had a single engine and no bow thruster so I had to be VERY conservative in close quarters maneuvers. On the Californian I would have not have  left the dock in a 25 knot crosswind in such a tight fairway, actually it would have been unlikely she would have sprung off the dock in 25 knots on the beam.  We used to keep one anchor ready to run in harbor but even that would have been little use as it take more than a couple of boat lengths to grab and the video showed about one and a half boat lengths from "almost" ramming Intrepid to the stern impacting the motorsailer.

IMHO a bad decision to leave the dock cascaded into collision and probably a new Captain onboard.

Sailronin,

You are undoubtedly right,  and I didn't mean to imply that dropped anchors would have prevented any of the impacts...only that they might have helped mitigate them/lessen the severity of them. Without a tug/tow already hooked up, the anchor was the only hope, however slim.  I loved the directors comments that she didn't think the weather affected the incident...really?  

Concur with the likely need for a new Captain, this once certainly didn't seem to play through in his mind what he would do if he were to lose power at a critical moment...

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these days anyone trying Anything is Libel for whatever happens after that

10' zodiac tossing a line to try and pull away = 1st to get Sued as well as last to get Sued

Move an inch and YOU are why it happened

unless you are in KIWI-LAND then yer GOLD !!

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Crash said:

Sailronin,

You are undoubtedly right,  and I didn't mean to imply that dropped anchors would have prevented any of the impacts...only that they might have helped mitigate them/lessen the severity of them. Without a tug/tow already hooked up, the anchor was the only hope, however slim.  I loved the directors comments that she didn't think the weather affected the incident...really?  

Concur with the likely need for a new Captain, this once certainly didn't seem to play through in his mind what he would do if he were to lose power at a critical moment...

Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.

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4 hours ago, Windward said:

Why are people who film these things with their phones so silly.  Honestly it is not that hard.  

Get a grip on yourself camera person.  Either put down your phone and help, or at least spare the world your commentary and panic.  Drama major perhaps?

I will forgive the guy because he managed to hold his phone in landscape orientation.

 

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25 minutes ago, monsoon said:

Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.

If its inevitable that leaving he dock will lead to a loss of control of the boat, the captain  responsibility is to  not to leave the dock.

If its not inevitable, then the captains responsibility is to  take the steps required to avoid loosing control.

We have all fucked up at some point, its best not to do it with something that big andheavy.

 

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50 minutes ago, monsoon said:

Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.

We have a saying in the aviation world that goes something along the lines of "exercising superior judgement so you don't need to exercise superior airmanship to save yourself.  Substitute seamanship for airmanship.  In this case (just a vessel re-positioning apparently from Seafood Fest to home pier) they should have either decided to wait for the wind to abate some, or decided to have a tug standby.  Its the old risk management analysis.  What could go wrong and what is the impact or consequence of it going wrong vs. what is to be gained by going forward with the plan/action.  

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1 hour ago, monsoon said:

Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.

See my comment above...basically he should not have left the dock in that much cross wind.  

 If you haven't sailed a traditionally rigged vessel it difficult to understand the amount of windage in rigging, yards, furled sails, etc.  We sailed the Californian (a square topsail schooner) from the Farallon Islands to the Golden Gate under bare poles and averaged better than 6.5 knots in 45-55 knots of wind. That's a lot of windage you don't deal with on a modern design.

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4 hours ago, Crash said:

Its the old risk management analysis.  What could go wrong and what is the impact or consequence of it going wrong vs. what is to be gained by going forward with the plan/action.  

How true.

3 hours ago, sailronin said:

See my comment above...basically he should not have left the dock in that much cross wind.  

How true.

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Maybe im not smart, but looks to me as if the port stern dock line in neatly FLAKED OVER THE RAIL......& props are turning....

I think he just fuked up the maneuver.....

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7 minutes ago, SCANAS said:

This why Constitution only leaves the dock every 20 yrs! 

Please give a little more credit to the US Navy (although not sure its warranted).....Constitution always has assistance leaving the dock and in the harbor...

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15 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

I will forgive the guy because he managed to hold his phone in landscape orientation.

 

Plus if nobody filmed it, we would have nothing to do at work and comment about

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I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :o

 

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15 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

I will forgive the guy because he managed to hold his phone in landscape orientation.

 

hear hear

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14 hours ago, sailronin said:

See my comment above...basically he should not have left the dock in that much cross wind.  

 If you haven't sailed a traditionally rigged vessel it difficult to understand the amount of windage in rigging, yards, furled sails, etc.  We sailed the Californian (a square topsail schooner) from the Farallon Islands to the Golden Gate under bare poles and averaged better than 6.5 knots in 45-55 knots of wind. That's a lot of windage you don't deal with on a modern design.

OK so we have 2 answers; 1. have a support boat on hand and/or 2. don't leave the dock in strong winds.  Maybe in the future they'll make sure option 1 is available.

My boat is down a longish, narrow fairway.  I really don't have a choice but to motor to and from my slip.  I've always got the sails ready to go, but it would be very very 'interesting' if I lost power on a windy day.

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40 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :o

 

I don't think it blew backwards, by the look of the thrust and water on the port side they were full throttle in reverse

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That water is engine exhaust I think, not prop wash. The RIB did get them pointed upwind, all they had to do was go. They backed into the boats behind them instead.

Just FYI, the invention of short range steam tugs made sailing ships MUCH more productive in the time period between their invention and steam cargo ships. Getting the last 10 miles into port could be a huge ordeal for ships back in the day.

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The boat managed to reverse direction and there is definitely some prop wash, making it likely that although the props were fouled they were not 100% ineffective.

One possibility is that with the ropes around the props they could not make enough forward momentum to turn the corner against a stiff cross breeze and ended up getting pinned down in the corner.

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From the linked article in the OP:  "The tall ship is named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, a hero in the War of 1812, who is remembered for his command: “Don’t Give Up the Ship.” "

Captain James Lawrence, not Perry uttered those famous words after he was mortally wounded on the frigate Chesapeake.  In 1813 the Chesapeake had left Boston harbor during the war of 1812 and was engaged in battle with the British frigate Shannon.  A few months later, also in 1813, Oliver Hazard Perry, a friend of Lawrence had a blue battle flag made with Lawrence's dying words for his flagship named after Lawrence.  During the battle of Lake Erie the Lawrence suffered severe damage and Perry transfered the flag to the brig Niagra and won the battle.  He sent the famous message after the battle:  "We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop."

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Another interesting footnote is that they did in the end, "give up the ship."  Chesapeake struck to Shannon.Phillip Brooke, Capt of HMS Shannon was seriously wounded as well during the battle, but would survive his injuries.

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And yet another interesting footnote.  After the battle, Perry returned to Presque Isle Bay, in Erie, PA where his fleet was built built.  His crews wintered there and the Niagara was anchored in a smaller bay on Presque Isle Bay.  The winters there are very harsh and his crew suffered mightily, kind of Perry's version of Washington wintering at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War.  The small bay is known to this day by its official name,  Misery Bay.  The Niagara was sunk in Misery Bay to preserve it, as well as the Lawrence and a couple of other ships from the original fleet.  The  Niagara was raised and restored in the early 1900s, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Lake Erie.   The other ships were sold and eventually sunk again due to being too deteriorated to be useful.  Eventually the Niagara was rebuilt again and in 1963 it was on display on land at the foot of State street in Erie.  The rebuilt version only contained a piece of the original keel and it probably wasn't even close in appearance to the original ship.  In the 1980s, Melbourne Smith, the builder of the Pride of Baltimore was commissioned to build a new, more historically accurate, sailing version of the Niagara.  Unfortunately no plans existed from the original brig,  The new ship was launched in '88 and finished in 1990.  The new brig, equipped with a diesel engine and modern safety and navigation features remains home ported in Erie, PA (my hometown) and is used for sail training, historical tours and travels around the Great Lakes every season.  It has been designated the flagship of the state of Pennsylvania.  The new ship only contains a few small pieces of timber from the original and is considered a replica, not a restored ship.  

 

The new Niagara, under sail near Put in Bay, the site of the Battle of Lake Erie, in 2009.

Brig_Niagara_full_sail.jpg

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I never understood why the masts are angled back like that.

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8 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

I never understood why the masts are angled back like that.

Used as cranes to load cargo, ammunition, stores, etc.

Also, and I'm not sure if this was planned, it allows the shrouds to be more effective backstays.

 

 

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23 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :o

 

he saved Intrepid, that was close

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9 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I never understood why the masts are angled back like that.

Because it looks much nicer?

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10 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I never understood why the masts are angled back like that.

Gives the ship a rakish look?

 

Tip your waitress.

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9 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I never understood why the masts are angled back like that.

Because it looks much nicer?

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On 10/20/2017 at 8:18 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :o

 

The Rib wihj the 30 hp outboard was doing nothing. Didn't you notice the 2 green Oldport Marine boats that were pushing the ship off of the 12 Meters? I was driving one of them. They both have 100 hp Yanmar diesel engines, and we were barely able to push them off. Fortunately, we were able to push the ship around the corner and kept the 12's from being crunched. By the way, the ship did drop an anchor at one point, without any warning, I was pushing on the bow at the time and it just missed my boat!

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You're saying they almost had a literal "you scratched my anchor" moment? 

 

This just keeps getting better. 

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On 10/19/2017 at 10:11 AM, ryley said:

no sound signals indicating distress? did they think they had it under control?

 

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I don't think anyone needed to hear a sound signal to warn them that they were in trouble, pretty self explanatory. 

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2 hours ago, Mgineo said:

The Rib wihj the 30 hp outboard was doing nothing. Didn't you notice the 2 green Oldport Marine boats that were pushing the ship off of the 12 Meters? I was driving one of them. They both have 100 hp Yanmar diesel engines, and we were barely able to push them off. Fortunately, we were able to push the ship around the corner and kept the 12's from being crunched. By the way, the ship did drop an anchor at one point, without any warning, I was pushing on the bow at the time and it just missed my boat!

Wow :o:o

Were you supposed to be doing that or did you jump in when you saw them in trouble?
Either way, good on you for what you managed to do.

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More 1812 related history . . 

The OHPerry was built upon the unfinished hull of the replica HMS Detroit, the British ship that lost to Perry's fleet in 1813. It had been a project of the city of Amherstberg, ON and others; but they ran out of money and sold the hull to the Rhode Island group. 

And by the way, much of what you have been taught about the War of 1812 is a pack of lies . . . as is most military history. 

http://otherwords.org/confessions-repentant-war-1812-reenactor/

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56 minutes ago, AJ Oliver said:

More 1812 related history . . 

The OHPerry was built upon the unfinished hull of the replica HMS Detroit, the British ship that lost to Perry's fleet in 1813. It had been a project of the city of Amherstberg, ON and others; but they ran out of money and sold the hull to the Rhode Island group. 

And by the way, much of what you have been taught about the War of 1812 is a pack of lies . . . as is most military history. 

http://otherwords.org/confessions-repentant-war-1812-reenactor/

This article implies that there are some people who think the US won the war of 1812.  Is that what schoolchildren in the US are taught?

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Should have tried the anker. Even Hotrod would have known that.

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29 minutes ago, dash34 said:

This article implies that there are some people who think the US won the war of 1812.  Is that what schoolchildren in the US are taught?

I wasn't taught that.

 

Then again I grew up when political correctness was not a thing.

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45 minutes ago, dash34 said:

This article implies that there are some people who think the US won the war of 1812.  Is that what schoolchildren in the US are taught?

Yes, and we also won the Pig War at Friday Harbor !! 

(But seriously, yes, they are taught that) 

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16 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

Used as cranes to load cargo, ammunition, stores, etc.

Also, and I'm not sure if this was planned, it allows the shrouds to be more effective backstays.

 

 

Yes, it is planned that way and as the ships are designed for that rake it is what is required to balance the helm.

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3 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Wow :o:o

Were you supposed to be doing that or did you jump in when you saw them in trouble?
Either way, good on you for what you managed to do.

I was at our dock and I  saw the tops of their spars leaving their dock.   I knew there would be trouble because of the wind speed and wind direction. I immediately  jumped in my boat and headed for the ship, by the time I got to the ship they were already having problems. We immediately started pushing  and prevented the ship from doing more damage than they did. Surprisingly, there was relatively minor damage to the boats that got hit. The 12'S would have sustained serious damage if we weren't there to push the ship off.

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On 10/19/2017 at 3:57 PM, Somebody Else said:

Look at her and listen to her: it's always too late with her type. My guess is that she has a lawyer on retainer for whenever she decides to play the divorce card.

She was by herself, with a 30 kt breeze pinning her to the dock. No way could she have left the dock that quickly.

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Yeah, I agree with Mgineo.  If she tried to get off the dock, all she'd have done is created some of her own carnage.  Now she might should got the hell off the port side of her boat!

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Most evident of the cluelessness of the folks running that ship has to be their executive director's insightful comment:

"Wurzbacher said it is a 500-ton (454-metric ton) vessel that regularly operates in windy conditions and the captain determined it was safe."  "I don’t think the weather affected the incident,” she said."

Was aboard the OHP for an open house not long back, ship was filthy and the lack of discipline from the deck plates up was evident.  

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damn, why didn't the muppets in the power boats get to windward, grab some lines, and haul that stupid fkg amusement park ride and it's wannabe pirate asshats away from the dock?

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On 10/20/2017 at 7:47 AM, yikes said:

Please give a little more credit to the US Navy (although not sure its warranted).....Constitution always has assistance leaving the dock and in the harbor...

Actually give the credit to the USCG and crew of the Eagle - they are the ones who train the USN on the finer points of handling a sailing ship.

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On 10/21/2017 at 5:51 PM, 3to1 said:

damn, why didn't the muppets in the power boats get to windward, grab some lines, and haul that stupid fkg amusement park ride and it's wannabe pirate asshats away from the dock?

LoL, you're serious aren't you?? 

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3 hours ago, Mgineo said:

LoL, you're serious aren't you?? 

my apologies, I was too condescending.

it struck me as odd there didn't seem to be anyone trying to pull it (vs. pushing it) away from the dock, or am I mistaken? was the wind strength negating any attempts?

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On 21/10/2017 at 6:41 PM, AJ Oliver said:

More 1812 related history . .. 

(... )

And by the way, much of what you have been taught about the War of 1812 is a pack of lies . . . as is most military history. 

http://otherwords.org/confessions-repentant-war-1812-reenactor/

My eldest daughter got taught the 100 years' war firstly in an English school then in a French one, after that she was a bit confused and couldn't work out who were the villains and the good ones. I solved the issue by telling here that war is a dirty business and all sides are villains. 

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On 10/21/2017 at 10:06 AM, Mgineo said:

I don't think anyone needed to hear a sound signal to warn them that they were in trouble, pretty self explanatory. 

I'm sure anyone down below on their boats while that behemoth was drifting around agrees with you 100%. Good on you to be trying to corral the beast, but at least one boat owner didn't know he was in danger until the crunch of the Hazard against his port side.

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On 10/20/2017 at 7:47 AM, yikes said:

 

On 10/20/2017 at 7:37 AM, SCANAS said:

This why Constitution only leaves the dock every 20 yrs! 

Please give a little more credit to the US Navy (although not sure its warranted).....Constitution always has assistance leaving the dock and in the harbor...

 

First off, Scanas, I know you're joking. the USS Constitution leaves the dock every year at least twice (with the exception of the past 3 years she's been in drydock). It's part of her commission that she needs to have so many miles under the keel each year. and yikes, you're serious too, right? the Constitution has maintained in as close to her original configuration as possible, which includes no auxiliary motor, so yeah.. she has assistance leaving the dock. She sailed under her own power in 2014 (with a tug attached) and in 2012 (unassisted), in addition to the 1997 200th anniversary sail. She just did a turnaround on Friday. Still impressive to watch (even under tow).

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10 hours ago, 3to1 said:

my apologies, I was too condescending.

it struck me as odd there didn't seem to be anyone trying to pull it (vs. pushing it) away from the dock, or am I mistaken? was the wind strength negating any attempts?

Just an offhand uninvolved comment: pulling lines requires someone competent on the vessel being pulled tendering and securing a line.  In this situation confidence in the crew's ability to be effective is already in doubt.  Assuming someone aboard could throw a line and effectively convey it to the launches (big assumption) what would be the odds that 1)it's tied off properly? 2) it's led through a chock and not, say, over stanchions?  Pushing doesn't require skill on the part of the vessel being helped. Your mileage may vary.

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9 hours ago, Panoramix said:

My eldest daughter got taught the 100 years' war firstly in an English school then in a French one, after that she was a bit confused and couldn't work out who were the villains and the good ones. I solved the issue by telling here that war is a dirty business and all sides are villains. 

The War of 1812 has to be the most retarded war ever.

Congress finally declared war on Britain, with impeccably bad timing: Just a few days earlier, the British foreign minister had decided to rescind the policy towards American trade that had caused all of the hullabaloo to begin with.

We also managed to lose most land engagements until after the war ended and THEN finally kicked some British ass when it didn't matter :rolleyes:

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On 10/21/2017 at 8:19 AM, Mgineo said:

The Rib wihj the 30 hp outboard was doing nothing. Didn't you notice the 2 green Oldport Marine boats that were pushing the ship off of the 12 Meters? I was driving one of them. They both have 100 hp Yanmar diesel engines, and we were barely able to push them off. Fortunately, we were able to push the ship around the corner and kept the 12's from being crunched. By the way, the ship did drop an anchor at one point, without any warning, I was pushing on the bow at the time and it just missed my boat!

 

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