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GauchoGreg

Macif / Gabart / Jules Verne 2017-18

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Joyon's crewed JVT passage last year had them arrive at Cape of Good Hope in just under 13 days (which was just a little behind the time set by Peyron in BPV).  Gabart is seriously hauling ass right now with ideal conditions, he could beat Joyon's time to the bottom of Africa if he can get there in 3 days, which looks very possible if he can just average a bit more than 500mi per day.  From there, Joyon hit the gas until he got below New Zealand, but still, what Gabart is doing right now is pretty nuts 38knts, solo, in the middle of the night and with a good shot at beating last year's crewed pace to the tip of Africa / the Southern Ocean.

 

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He goes 38kn now - in front of a system - thats seems to travel at about 700miles in 24 hours - so he should be able to stay in front of that for some time...

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5 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Gets rougher in the next few days:  4-6 meter seas, following of course, but could slow down some

Where can we see the actual conditions he is sailing in. Any videos, onboard recordings etc?

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On 12/11/2017 at 12:01 AM, semelis said:

If I get it right he could be a day ahead in 48 hours :o

By the end of the 10th day Gabart is 4º eastward of Coville at the end of  the 11th day. A bit further north,  but a day ahead he is.

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40 minutes ago, Omer said:

Where can we see the actual conditions he is sailing in. Any videos, onboard recordings etc?

There are a few short clips all over the place, lately about batten repairs. 
twitter  instagram  The macif group YT channel
France Sport TV also has several short clips on their YT channel including shore side interviews. They have playlist too.
Macif website has more of the same in the media section.

Just like Initiatives Coeur there is little to none EN content, if you don't speak french you are just not relevant to them.

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1 hour ago, Chasm said:

There are a few short clips all over the place, lately about batten repairs. 
twitter  instagram  The macif group YT channel
France Sport TV also has several short clips on their YT channel including shore side interviews. They have playlist too.
Macif website has more of the same in the media section.

Just like Initiatives Coeur there is little to none EN content, if you don't speak french you are just not relevant to them.

Yea but its still relevant to me and interesting stuff. My HS French does not get me far but helps a little.  I think we are going to see him get pretty far south over the next few days.  I need to dig a bit to find where the ice is to see if it complicates routing.  But it appears a nice long runway for quite a while and shorter race track if the ice is not a problem.

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26 minutes ago, Wess said:

Yea but its still relevant to me and interesting stuff. My HS French does not get me far but helps a little.  I think we are going to see him get pretty far south over the next few days.  I need to dig a bit to find where the ice is to see if it complicates routing.  But it appears a nice long runway for quite a while and shorter race track if the ice is not a problem.

 Yes, the ice is coming up quite high in the South Atlantic before before Africa I think, and seems to me they did put an "ice limit" on Coville tracker, hope they will do the same.

Btw, just noticed that Gabart tracker makes the windy data a bit more "dramatic" compared to windy site direct, the colors are pushed more in the red/purple scale a bit.

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Is he on the verge of out-pacing the low pressure system he is riding right now? It seems to me that by getting slowly further and further ahead of the current depression, he could very well bump into the no-wind zone in front of him. I guess that would be a first for a single handed sailor...

Also, the location of the ice is going to be critical. If he wants to sneak pass the no-wind zone in front of him, my wild-ass-guess is that he will have to go down to South 48° ish, around East 28°ish... in about 48-52 hours, right?

But can he go that South without hitting ice?

Also, according to Macif website (below cartographie chart) he is sleeping less than 4 hr per 24 hrs almost consistently. The most I have seen was just above 4 hrs... How is he doing it?!

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3 hours ago, trailson said:

now 771.4 nm/24h, yesterday's slowdown included

amazing!

Up to 776/24h, now, but "only" going 33knts at the moment.  Man, he has ripped through the South Atlantic.  Roughly 1,000mi to go to the longitude of Good Hope.  Should make it there in under 12 days, but he does have some light pressure ahead.... looks like he is going to slide under the high pressure as it moves northeast.

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2 hours ago, GauchoGreg said:

Looks like he is going to slide under the high pressure as it moves northeast.

Looks like a great run.

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805.4 in the last 24 hours right now!, so indeed he broke his own 24h record !!

That must be so fuckin amazing being on such a beast alone at these speeds ...

And 3.26 hours sleep in last 24 (averaging around 4 or less apparently), that must be so tough ...

 

Previous record : 

2016 "MACIF" 100ft Tri, Francois Gabart FRA, 784NM, 32.67 kts

 

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^  Damn, that is amazing.  I was just watching a vid of Ryan talking about their (Lending Club) record from Cowes to Dinard and how they were stoked that they reached 38knts for part of the time, and I was thinking of how Gabart has been at or around 35-38knts for so much of the South Atlantic (and had been doing similarly in the North Atlantic tradewinds), averaging almost 34 over the past 24h, and doing it all solo, and fixing broken bits, and not sleeping.....

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And by the way he had to repair a batten during this run , video  below :

http://www.macifcourseaularge.com/actus/reparation-a-bord-trimaran-macif-images/

 

And in below news, they explain that his on shore team gave him extremely detailed procedures with tools screws and stuff for doing it :

http://www.macifcourseaularge.com/actus/ligne-a-haute-vitesse/

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This is clearly one of the rare situations where it's OK for adults to wear Crocs. I love the plethora of jam cleats on the door frame. I should have something like that set up at home connected to some Rube Goldburg apparatus to start coffee making as soon as I wake up.

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Here are Francis Joyon's intermediate times from the crewed record:

Intermediate times

Equator: 5 days, 18 hrs, 59 minutes, 4h 3m behind Banque Populaire V  (5 days, 20 hours for Gabart)
Good Hope: 12 days, 19 hrs, 28 minutes, 21h 40m behind Banque Populaire V (Gabart is ~1,050 miles from passing the longitude of Good Hope at 10 days 9 hours. He'll get there at 11 days, 17 hours at his current speed)
Cape Agulhas: 12 days, 21 hrs, 22 minutes, 21h 34m behind Banque Populaire V
Cape Leeuwin: 17 days, 6 hrs, 59 minutes, 16h  58m ahead of Banque Populaire V
Tasmania: 18 days, 18 hrs, 31 minutes, 1d 12h 43m ahead of Banque Populaire V
Cape Horn: 26 days, 15 hrs and 45 minutes, 4d 6h ahead of Banque Populaire V
Equator: 35 days 4 hrs and 9 minutes, 2d 22h  36m ahead of Banque Populaire V.
Equator – Ushant: 5 days, 19 hrs, 21 minutes

The real challenge against Joyon will be Good Hope to Leeuwin, which Joyon et al cracked off in an unreal 4 days, 9 hours

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Looks like that high ahead of him is eroding and moving north very nicely in the projections on windy.  He should have several days of pretty smooth, high speed sailing without a ton of drama.  Then he will have that nasty low to work around that is set to develop southeast of Africa, between the horn and the Kurguelen Islands.  Sure he will go below the low, but then there will be some interesting stuff to deal with unless he can get ahead of it.

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BPV's outright record of 908 is 8 years old... just sayin'.  Gabart should go for it.... he only has to average 38knts.  Seriously, though Gabart is taking advantage of an awesome opportunity, here.

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It's the second-fastest 24 hours ever, crewed or not.

 

ETA - Actually not true.  I realized the WSSR Council doesn't record crewed 24-hour distances of less than BP-V's 906-mile effort after it was set in 2009.  There's at least one more (894 by Joyon and crew) that outdoes Gabart 

Edited by Tabarly
Incorrect info

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11 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Sorry, is this 24hr record a single handed or a personal best?

Single handed, but he holds the old record at 780.

The Volvo set the ice limit just below 45 degrees (you can see it on their tracker).  Icebergs have to stay below that line.

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4 minutes ago, Tabarly said:

It's the second-fastest 24 hours ever, crewed or not.

I was wondering about that.... did not want to look through for any high-mile 24-hour performances in crewed boats that did not break the BPV record (Spindrift or Joyon, last year, most notably).

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Just now, Kenny Dumas said:

Single handed, but he holds the old record at 780.

The Volvo set the ice limit just below 45 degrees (you can see it on their tracker).  Icebergs have to stay below that line.

:lol:

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2 minutes ago, GauchoGreg said:

I was wondering about that.... did not want to look through for any high-mile 24-hour performances in crewed boats that did not break the BPV record (Spindrift or Joyon, last year, most notably).

Hey, yeah I realized post-fact that I did not account for that.  Joyon et al set an 894-mile 24 hour when they did the RTW record and they put 800-miles per day in over eight straight days, so there are likely more.

 

Still impressive!

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So, right now Gabart is cranking at almost 38knts.... beating his speed of 24hrs earlier at a paltry 35, so increasing his new benchmark, still......  amazing.  Sitting at the front end of that low, with the high in front of him, he must have a perfect seastate to work with....

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From the g-trans of the Macif site:

Quote

" I am delighted. Records are made to be beaten, that's how we progress. The sensations at these speeds are quite extraordinary, the boat is flying, it's a mix of power and lightness". Not one to rest on his laurels, the skipper of the MACIF trimaran immediately adds: "Now, this is not the priority objective, the idea is to finish this world tour ..."

http://www.macifcourseaularge.com/actus/francois-gabart-bat-record-de-distance-parcourue-24h-solitaire/

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Think Spindrift2 is bummed they did not catch the same window?  Not that they could really do any better given the weather train Gabart is on.  RTW/offshore sailing is in a fascinating spot, right now.

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53 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Single handed, but he holds the old record at 780.

The Volvo set the ice limit just below 45 degrees (you can see it on their tracker).  Icebergs have to stay below that line.

Yes, you too Larsen-C 

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37 minutes ago, GauchoGreg said:

Think Spindrift2 is bummed they did not catch the same window?  Not that they could really do any better given the weather train Gabart is on.  RTW/offshore sailing is in a fascinating spot, right now.

Yes was thinking the same, I read somewhere the reason they didn't start their stand by earlier is that Guichard was doing some extreme 40 thing in Shanghai, but even if that South Atlantic run couldn't be seen from the start, he must be a bit pissed off right now, priorities... 

 

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it would be fascinating if the MACIF site would give us TWS, AWS, TWA and AWA numbers as well as what info they do have. 

Volvo does this. Always curious what speed it's actually blowing when the boats are in these conditions and putting up these kinds of numbers. 

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836+..... A solo man sailing at an average speed of 34.8knts/40mph for 24 hours (max was only 35.4, so he has been incredibly consistent) .... What a combination of sailor, machine, routing, and conditions.

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10 minutes ago, GauchoGreg said:

836+..... A solo man sailing at an average speed of 34.8knts/40mph for 24 hours (max was only 35.4, so he has been incredibly consistent) .... What a combination of sailor, machine, routing, and conditions.

When did the 24 hours begin/does it finish?

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32 minutes ago, GauchoGreg said:

836+..... A solo man sailing at an average speed of 34.8knts/40mph for 24 hours (max was only 35.4, so he has been incredibly consistent) .... What a combination of sailor, machine, routing, and conditions.

Both the overall max and the 24h max have been stuck at the exact same values for days now, wouldn't trust those values. 

What an unbelievable run by Gabart! 

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Wow! This is incredible!!!

 

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21 minutes ago, southerncross said:

When did the 24 hours begin/does it finish?

Any 24 hour period that is recorded. 

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He mentioned sailing 40 knots one moment.

from twit;

It's going fast! ... more than 40nds ... 24h record should improve again ...

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Its over, think he will slow down a bit;

Twit :
851Mn
!  That's over 35nds average. What run !!! Think we'll stop there for today ...

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14 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Its over, think he will slow down a bit;

Twit :
851Mn
!  That's over 35nds average. What run !!! Think we'll stop there for today ...

Hard to comprehend ...... give me 1 hour of that on that boat and I'll happily hang up the boots..... 

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39 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Its over, think he will slow down a bit;

Twit :
851Mn
!  That's over 35nds average. What run !!! Think we'll stop there for today ...

Unbelievable speeds. Alone in the middle of the Atlantic. Gabart seems to be one of a kind!

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Checked in at 851, and then at 850.9 and then 850.8. Seems to be sustaining speed, but not increasing, i wonder if he has peaked. 

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Gabart, Joyon, Coville, Peyron, de Kersauson, Le Cleac'h, the list is long.

But he has climbed the ladder quick.

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26 minutes ago, ronnie_simpson said:

Checked in at 851, and then at 850.9 and then 850.8. Seems to be sustaining speed, but not increasing, i wonder if he has peaked. 

He is kind of bumping into the high, in front of him.... not much he can do about it but let it slide north... he doesn't want to go too far south....

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yeah that high pressure surely flattened out the sea state for him and allowed the high average speeds though! definitely seems to be reaching less pressure and slowing down now. let's hope he can at least keep moving the same speed as the low-pressure and pour on the miles to the RTW reference time.

 

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Surprised they didn't route him a little farther south to avoid the high.  Be a bummer if he gets stuck and has to take a big dive S.

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31 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Surprised they didn't route him a little farther south to avoid the high.  Be a bummer if he gets stuck and has to take a big dive S.

I've played with the forward function of the weather forecast and it seems ok for Gabart. Actually a lot better than "ok".

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18 minutes ago, Hydrogene said:

Unbelievable speeds. Alone in the middle of the Atlantic. Gabart seems to be one of a kind!

Or perhaps having the mental game of of Joyon and Peyron only doing it at this level while substantially younger so at a more peak athletic point. You could put Le Cleach and Coville in this category though the latter is a bit older. I love the feeling here that like a NASA mission of old, this is a world class team supporting an incredibly well equipped and prepared guy to do something that's just on a different level. That was always the romance of Formula 1; the best of the best engineering with the athlete at the sharp edge of a huge team.  

I have to say this virtual race is  weirdly compelling. We see Macif virtually racing Sodebo but Sodebo is in year old weather, and we can't see its weather forecast, only the 24hr dots on its track. So we look at the forecast to try to figure out how far ahead Gabart needs to be for when Sodebo hits its biggest days. If Sodebo was actually there it would be cool and all but I bet Macif would be slowing grinding out a lead as it did in the last two races, and it would be more like watching the TJV or even VOR. Time shift: a fascinating if rather obscure way to make racing interesting. 

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1 hour ago, semelis said:

I've played with the forward function of the weather forecast and it seems ok for Gabart. Actually a lot better than "ok".

Yep, that high erodes and moves north perfectly for him..... seriously, he could use some sub-30knt time to get some sleep, and I see he is doing just that.  It isn't until he gets over nearer the Kurueglean (sp?) islands does it look like he runs into some messy conditions where he will likely have to do a fair amount of jibing.  Better get his sleep now.

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22 minutes ago, Laurent said:

He is slacking off...

He slept almost 5 hours in the last 24 hours....

 

:D

Yeah, best sleep he has gotten since getting on the boat.  I'm sure it is good sleep, too, having crushed the record and getting a nice lead on the benchmark.  Should be nice conditions on board for sleeping, too.

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8 hours ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Or perhaps having the mental game of of Joyon and Peyron only doing it at this level while substantially younger so at a more peak athletic point. You could put Le Cleach and Coville in this category though the latter is a bit older. I love the feeling here that like a NASA mission of old, this is a world class team supporting an incredibly well equipped and prepared guy to do something that's just on a different level. That was always the romance of Formula 1; the best of the best engineering with the athlete at the sharp edge of a huge team.  

The mental aspect is big but the mechanical one is also huge. Macif comes from a long line of trimaran evolution. By now the usual suspects in and around Lorient should be able to build a boat that is both fast and holds together. (Last(?) of the daggerboard generation, breakage got reintroduced with foiling.)
Maybe most important is that it has been explicitly build and set up for single handed operation. The layout and environmental protection is very different from the older boats.

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10 hours ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Or perhaps having the mental game of of Joyon and Peyron only doing it at this level while substantially younger so at a more peak athletic point. You could put Le Cleach and Coville in this category though the latter is a bit older. I love the feeling here that like a NASA mission of old, this is a world class team supporting an incredibly well equipped and prepared guy to do something that's just on a different level. That was always the romance of Formula 1; the best of the best engineering with the athlete at the sharp edge of a huge team.  

I have to say this virtual race is  weirdly compelling. We see Macif virtually racing Sodebo but Sodebo is in year old weather, and we can't see its weather forecast, only the 24hr dots on its track. So we look at the forecast to try to figure out how far ahead Gabart needs to be for when Sodebo hits its biggest days. If Sodebo was actually there it would be cool and all but I bet Macif would be slowing grinding out a lead as it did in the last two races, and it would be more like watching the TJV or even VOR. Time shift: a fascinating if rather obscure way to make racing interesting. 

I know they didnt start at the same place or time but how does Macif's run south compare to Sodebo's run in the TJV? 

from what I could see they looked pretty similar, but I was only checking the trackers and couldn't get a side by side comparison.

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One thing that has also evolved quite a lot it seems to me is the shore teams (for preparation, boat, physical, food, etc), I read somewhere there are 30 people for Macif/Gabard

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Any idea what macif is running for an autopilot?

 

I wonder what/where they placed sensors for the data required to keep something at an average of 35+ knots

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Talking about auto-pilot, a tidbit of information from Macif website. As suspected, he is not spending much time behind the wheel...

« Driving for a RTW record, single handed, does not happen at the steering wheel. It is basically the autopilot that is taking care of that. For instance, since Monday, I have not touched the steering wheel once », explained François Gabart, on Tuesday. « Driving, it is finding the right angle, in relation to the waves pattern and the wind, finding a way to make the boat go fast, but smoothly. You have to listen to the boat. You have to notice vibrations that are not right; suspicious noises, usually they are the important signs that you need to change something to go fast.»

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1 hour ago, A Boy Named Stu said:

Any idea what macif is running for an autopilot?

 

I wonder what/where they placed sensors for the data required to keep something at an average of 35+ knots

Sheet to tiller. 

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1 hour ago, GauchoGreg said:

More than 5-1/2 of sleep in past 24h.  That is about 3 hours more than he had been getting.

That is more than many people get in 24 hours!

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10 minutes ago, clwgr said:

That is more than many people get in 24 hours!

He's on a leisure cruise.  I doubt the buffet is quite on par with Royal Caribbean, though.

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20 hours ago, LeoV said:

Gabart, Joyon, Coville, Peyron, de Kersauson, Le Cleac'h, the list is long.

But he has climbed the ladder quick.

Hey, hey come on. Respect for those not with us but one of the first and a true rebel named Steve...

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VMG down to 11.9, course 71 deg, about 200 nm from the Cape longitude, so maybe he's going for the record to the cape and will jibe after that?  I guess a record is a record and his job is to generate press, but seems he's sub-optimizing the RTW pace.  VMG only 11.9??

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1 minute ago, Wess said:

Hey, hey come on. Respect for those not with us but one of the first and a true rebel named Steve...

Callahan?

    Oh you must mean Fossett.

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