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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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GauchoGreg

Macif / Gabart / Jules Verne 2017-18

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He jibed.

An article here explains the plan which is not much different that what has been guessed/discussed above.

He went that much North to avoid the worst of the low pressure system. He was still supposed to get 38 to 40 knots of wind this morning... On sail area, he was down to 3 reefs and J3. He went back to J2. The sea state is not easy. They are talking of breaking waves.

Right now, it is a race to stay "in front" of the low pressure system. I put the term under quotes because to my untrained eye, he is not in front of the low pressure system yet... It will be a critical 3 to 4 days to stay with the system. Multiple small jibes are potentially part of the plan. Cape Horn is expected at the end of this week...

Also, there is a small audio link on the article above, where you can hear alarms going off. He can obviously set alarms for an array of conditions; winds too high, winds too low, boat speed (high and low), TWA change, low batteries, and sheets automatic release: those ones will ring louder and louder, giving the opportunity to un-cleat and release the sheets before it happens automatically. During the audio FG explains that the alarm is because the wind is picking up; 38, 40, 42 knots, and boat speed "about the same"....

On a different note, they explained in a previous article the role of the different sensors. If we know the number of grinder turns he is doing, it is because originally they needed the counter to figure out when to stop some maneuvers. When he furls a jib, he does not see the sail!!! So they established that you need X turns on the grinder to fully furl the J1 and so much for the J2, etc. He uses that to know when to stop... Same thing for mast tilt, mast rake, foils up and down... He does not see the foils either from the cockpit.

Obviously, they collect all that information and process it to fine tune what is the best boat configuration for the conditions. (how much tilt, rake, foil, to which TWS and TWA). You collect the data for enough thousands of miles, and you can improve the boat settings.

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Gabart saying that he is in "slow mode" right now, due to the sea state.

Wonder if he will lose this low or not.

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This low as maybe a better vmg then Gabart, if he needs to gybe because of ice, he can loose the Low.

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16 minutes ago, LeoV said:

This low as maybe a better vmg then Gabart, if he needs to gybe because of ice, he can loose the Low.

Thank you @Laurent

Agree Leo.  It will be interesting to see how much of any of his lead he can hold till the Cape rounding.  It would appear he does not have an easy path.  The South Atlantic was kind.  The Indian and Pacific (so far), not so much...:(

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Looking at windy one can see that this is going to be tough. If he´s lucky he may ride the low to Cape Horn and avoid the high  pressure area which is building there on saturday. Then up the Atlantic next week there may be a biiig wall at 90 degrees to his course. Then looking at Covilles course up the Atlantic he had some luck and was pretty fast. FG better should have around 1000 miles in his pocket before the Falklands otherwise it will be tight, not talking about UFO´s.I remember that Coville in one of his attempts was 1000 miles in advance at the Horn then got stuck at the brazilian coast and finally hit a container and that was that.

Still a long way to go.

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9 minutes ago, ET1 said:

Looking at windy one can see that this is going to be tough. If he´s lucky he may ride the low to Cape Horn and avoid the high  pressure area which is building there on saturday. Then up the Atlantic next week there may be a biiig wall at 90 degrees to his course. Then looking at Covilles course up the Atlantic he had some luck and was pretty fast. FG better should have around 1000 miles in his pocket before the Falklands otherwise it will be tight, not talking about UFO´s.I remember that Coville in one of his attempts was 1000 miles in advance at the Horn then got stuck at the brazilian coast and finally hit a container and that was that.

Still a long way to go.

Yes, clearly it is far from over, and in the medium/short term, I think he plans to go more south so that he gets a better sea : less fetch as the back of the low has more southern winds.

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A new article here details the situation.

As stated above, he decided to slow down because of the sea state mostly. I think it is a given now that he is going to fall behind the current system.

He broke the J2 furler a second time, and rebuilt it last night with the spare carbon fiber plates he has on board. Those plates can be used for this type of repair, bulkhead repair, hull repair. He did not bring a spare furler with him because in 2 years of navigation, it never failed.  He thinks it is breaking now, because he is (or was) sailing very fast in very heavy seas. He says that it generated massive loads "at the front of the boat" (his words). My interpretation is that when you pierce at 40 knots through a wall of water, anything sticking out (balcony, furlers,...) is getting through loads it was not designed for...

FG also explains that he is also keeping track very accurately of what he uses for the repair and share the information with his shore crew. So they know exactly what he has left if they need to give recommendations for future repairs... (glue is for instance an important resource...)

He then details some training he has done for repair protocols. They trained him on some repairs on key systems like electronics, auto pilots, engine for genset, So if something goes down, he does not have to go through the manual, in 40 knots winds and 7 meters seas, to figure out how to swap a key component. He alluded to the fact that they have 3 (THREE) completely independent nav systems on board. And he trained on how to switch from number 1 to number 2 to number 3.

He concludes by "there are still many repairs I have not trained on... such as repairing a J2 furler..."

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^ Amazing preparation..... the chaos of environmental conditions, unfortunately, can't be simply overcome through preparation.  Gabart is experiencing the true Southern Ocean experience.  Too bad multi-hulls can't handle seas ....for our AC friends ;)

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5 hours ago, Laurent said:

A new article here details the situation.

As stated above, he decided to slow down because of the sea state mostly. I think it is a given now that he is going to fall behind the current system.

He broke the J2 furler a second time, and rebuilt it last night with the spare carbon fiber plates he has on board. Those plates can be used for this type of repair, bulkhead repair, hull repair. He did not bring a spare furler with him because in 2 years of navigation, it never failed.  He thinks it is breaking now, because he is (or was) sailing very fast in very heavy seas. He says that it generated massive loads "at the front of the boat" (his words). My interpretation is that when you pierce at 40 knots through a wall of water, anything sticking out (balcony, furlers,...) is getting through loads it was not designed for...

FG also explains that he is also keeping track very accurately of what he uses for the repair and share the information with his shore crew. So they know exactly what he has left if they need to give recommendations for future repairs... (glue is for instance an important resource...)

He then details some training he has done for repair protocols. They trained him on some repairs on key systems like electronics, auto pilots, engine for genset, So if something goes down, he does not have to go through the manual, in 40 knots winds and 7 meters seas, to figure out how to swap a key component. He alluded to the fact that they have 3 (THREE) completely independent nav systems on board. And he trained on how to switch from number 1 to number 2 to number 3.

He concludes by "there are still many repairs I have not trained on... such as repairing a J2 furler..."

Thanks a lot Laurent, please keep them coming. This kind of preparation, tracking everything what he has and does on-board and the way he sails the boat mostly isolated from the environment look more and more like a space mission. Going out on deck is like a spacewalk for the astronauts...

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46 minutes ago, erdb said:

Going out on deck is like a spacewalk for the astronauts...

Almost, only when gravity disappears it returns with vengeance on a boat, LOL.

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Day summary :

The routing guy says that they were trying to stay at the swell speed in order not to break the boat, and that they will keep going South but not too much for the iceberg, but the weather route will also require not going too much South.

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Merci yl75!

Good summary of the comments from the video.

One last point, the routing guy said that FG got 50 knots of wind last night...

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Does anyone know what make the wind generator is on the back of the boat. It looks pretty cool albeit maybe you need 20 knots of apparent to make it work:)

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50 knots, only felt as 20 as he is making 30 knots of speed.

But really, I like the recaps, well done.

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1 hour ago, bdu98252 said:

Does anyone know what make the wind generator is on the back of the boat. It looks pretty cool albeit maybe you need 20 knots of apparent to make it work:)

No I don't, I asked the question on "hisse et oh" and people didn't know either.

I guess it's a prototype, in fact I don't know of any two blades wind generator in prod these days (for sailboats)

And by the way I don't know why he isn't using only a hydrogenerator (much more efficient) in addition to the solar panels.(and diesel generator ...)

Most Imoca are now only on solar plus hydrogenerator, maybe he cannot use an hydro on this boat, doesn't want to ?

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IN the clips opening shots of the tri there is a hydrogenerator on the back, that are pre record shots, so at least they tested them.

 

hmm looking at it, almost looks like hydro with funky blades: pre start photo.

But blades after house for a windmill, and two blades ??

For a hydro, its wrong to blades in front ??

171103MAC_1379.jpg

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Its a windmill:

Pour produire l'énergie nécessaire à l'alimentation de l'électronique embarquée, le bateau possède un moteur à gazole destiné à faire tourner un groupe électrogène, des panneaux solaires, et une éolienne de secours en cas de coup dur.

Source: interesting article;
http://www.clubic.com/mag/sport/article-786144-1-reportage-maxi-trimaran-high-tech-francois-gabart.html

So its an emergency energy source, en cas de coup dur= for when things go wrong.

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Indeed except for the blades, it looks a lot like a watt and sea hydrogenerator (the one used on "all" imoca and volvo 65).

Maybe a watt and sea wind generator prototype ?

(but stange that the blades are in the back for a wind genrator)

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About the windmill/hydrogenerator, I think it is indeed a windmill (quite high, always up and sometimes spinning in the videos), and in fact a watt n sea hydro must not be obvious on a tri, as the center hull may be flying quite often, and putting one on each floats would complicate getting it up and down.

note:  wattnsea now has a version that you put directly on the hull (like a small sail drive) :

https://www.wattandsea.com/fr/produits/hydro-cruising/pod-cruising-600

But the propeller doesn't fold, although apparently it can be put in "free spinning mode" (on/off switch)

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Note : today news also says that he should leave the falklands on port going up, and then it could be quite tricky with high pressure bubbles developing along the Argentinian coast.

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Those three gybes kept him from getting much sleep, just 3 hours. But now a magic carpet ride to the horn, maybe even room for another 24 hour record? But as noted before, Coville had a similar "easy" Pacific crossing, so getting to 1000 miles advance by the horn seems tough.

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23 hours ago, yl75 said:

No I don't, I asked the question on "hisse et oh" and people didn't know either.

I guess it's a prototype, in fact I don't know of any two blades wind generator in prod these days (for sailboats)

And by the way I don't know why he isn't using only a hydrogenerator (much more efficient) in addition to the solar panels.(and diesel generator ...)

Most Imoca are now only on solar plus hydrogenerator, maybe he cannot use an hydro on this boat, doesn't want to ?

I think in a boat able to do 40 knots or higher the power generated from the water would be too high for the Watt Sea system but am only guessing. I think he generally with apparent wind he has 20 knots plus over the deck so probably the wind generator is getting pretty good unitisation. Your IMOCA's typically can do higher than 20knots but they tend to spend a lot of time in the high teens where the Watt Sea system probably works pretty well.

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....doing 36kn VMG right now - and up to 720miles 24h - 2 days in front at C. Horn? 

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20 hours ago, yl75 said:

Note : today news also says that he should leave the falklands on port going up, and then it could be quite tricky with high pressure bubbles developing along the Argentinian coast.

If the 4 day forecast on the tracker is accurate I think he will take a more easterly route up the south Atlantic than is typical.

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2 hours ago, bdu98252 said:

I think in a boat able to do 40 knots or higher the power generated from the water would be too high for the Watt Sea system but am only guessing. I think he generally with apparent wind he has 20 knots plus over the deck so probably the wind generator is getting pretty good unitisation. Your IMOCA's typically can do higher than 20knots but they tend to spend a lot of time in the high teens where the Watt Sea system probably works pretty well.

 For the Watt n sea hydro, I think the "propeller" can be adapted for the speed, but the issue might be that it is not usable when the main hull is flying.

(by the way I think there should be a new rule forbidding diesel usage for these Ocean races/records (except for emergency), and  it would be good to optimize all the energy systems towards the "average cruiser" then)

Otherwise in the latest news :

https://macifcourseaularge.com/actus/libere-delivre/

They still have Sunday evening (UTC/FR I guess) as ETA for the Horn, but they don't say anything regarding the up the Atlantic route in this one.

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At 40 knts of boat speed even with the propeller adapting to the speed, the mounting system would be put to so much stress !

And with all hulls potentially flying .... quite a pain in the ass to keep the propeller submerged.

Windmills are at their most efficiency at 20-25 knts of wind speed ain't they ?

.... cruising speed for those boats !

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At this rate, the 1000 nm of advantage goal will be set in about 4 hours.

He's already over 800 nm/24h  and getting better and better.

 

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820 nm/ 24 h and still way to go.

Yeap + 1000 at Cape Horn and 7000 miles to go. It is feasible.  It looks like. Tough Atlantic not so nice. 

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He has to keep the peddle to the metal.  Little sleep over next 3/4 days I am guessing. There are open doors if his high averages can be maintained. Bon chance!

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30 minutes ago, yl75 said:

837 now, what was his previous record ? 851, right ?

I think so.  840 now

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By the way, there is a news on ultimboat.com saying that Vincent Riou will not only buy current Coville Sodebo, but also launch the build of a new Ultim, that would make 5 of them of nearly the same generation ! (macif, gitana, banque pop iX, new sodebo coming, and the one of Riou)

 

The news is below :

https://www.ouest-france.fr/sport/voile/les-indiscrets-de-la-transat-jacques-vabre-5411708

Quote

Vincent Riou à la recherche de fonds.

L’ex-vainqueur du Vendée Globe (2004) aimerait se lancer sur le circuit Ultime, et ambitionne dans un premier temps de racheter Sodebo après la prochaine Route du Rhum. Pour l’instant, sa recherche de fond est au point mort, mais Vincent Riou, 2e de la Transat Jacques Vabre avec Erwann Le Roux, avait, cette semaine, à Paris, plusieurs rendez-vous avec des patrons de grosses entreprises. Son projet ambitionne même la construction d’un nouveau bateau pour l’après Tour du monde 2019. Budget estimé : 20 M € sur cinq ans. Réponse attendue d’ici la fin de l’année.

But really nothing confirmed yet, looking for budget, and this would be for after the 2019 race, so he would do the 2019 race with current Sodebo, and launch the boat afterwards (that would make it quite a bit more recent than current ones).

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Saying he is going fast without pushing too much in the sea, and that it should keep on going that way for a while

And that he is happy to see one of his last southern sunrise for this year ...

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55 minutes ago, Tropical Madness said:

840 miles and 6 1/2 hrs sleep... that's how you do it.

So apparently he finaly got used to sleep with the center hull flying !

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The sleep at 800+...?! 

Good luck to his Ultim competition watching this lap. They are titans for sure they have to be shaking their heads at what's going to be required of them and their boats to be competitive. 

How's the Atlantic looking? 

 

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On 12/1/2017 at 7:04 AM, popo said:

At 40 knts of boat speed even with the propeller adapting to the speed, the mounting system would be put to so much stress !

And with all hulls potentially flying .... quite a pain in the ass to keep the propeller submerged.

Windmills are at their most efficiency at 20-25 knts of wind speed ain't they ?

.... cruising speed for those boats !

Couldn't someone make a form of generator that planes behind the boat with water-wheel type spinner, rather than the admittedly more efficient conventional propeller used on displacement monohulls?  On boats like this that are nearly always going over 25 knotts (and foiling or not, the central hull most often out of the water), it could be on a articulating arm or even a cable, planing/skipping behind the boat with the wheel spinning away generating power?

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8 hours ago, yl75 said:

By the way, there is a news on ultimboat.com saying that Vincent Riou will not only buy current Coville Sodebo, but also launch the build of a new Ultim, that would make 5 of them of nearly the same generation ! (macif, gitana, banque pop iX, new sodebo coming, and the one of Riou)

 

The news is below :

https://www.ouest-france.fr/sport/voile/les-indiscrets-de-la-transat-jacques-vabre-5411708

But really nothing confirmed yet, looking for budget, and this would be for after the 2019 race, so he would do the 2019 race with current Sodebo, and launch the boat afterwards (that would make it quite a bit more recent than current ones).

Awesome.... more the better.  Will this start eroding interest in the IMOCA, which seems to be heading more in a OD direction, while these guys are going more open (except for the 105' restriction)?

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20 minutes ago, GauchoGreg said:

Awesome.... more the better.  Will this start eroding interest in the IMOCA, which seems to be heading more in a OD direction, while these guys are going more open (except for the 105' restriction)?

Could be, their race in 2019 will be on the same course as the vendée, although I guess they will take the Jules Verne start line (Ushant Lizard), but not sure about that in fact.

Maybe they could make a "two class" Vendée Globe ? (not sure the VG organisation would like that)

Still much more expensive though most probably.

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3 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Could be, their race in 2019 will be on the same course as the vendée, although I guess they will take the Jules Verne start line (Ushant Lizard), but not sure about that in fact.

Maybe they could make a "two class" Vendée Globe ? (not sure the VG organisation would like that)

Still much more expensive though most probably.

Certainly.... the IMOCA will continue to have more boats.... but will more people be paying attention to these insane boats all in one race under solo conditions?   I guess the mono-purists will focus on the IMOCA, and maybe those who like the personalities involved there more.

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Maybe need a new WSSC record for fastest 4 hours while asleep???  138 is a good number for a 4 knsb 24 hour run, so there's trickle down too!

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Looks like the wind shadow at the Cape may indicate staying away a bit, but he's got at least a few days of good sailing in the S Atlantic.  Sweet.

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1 hour ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Looks like the wind shadow at the Cape may indicate staying away a bit, but he's got at least a few days of good sailing in the S Atlantic.  Sweet.

Yes, in the last news they say he will get at least 100 nm south of the cape, and indeed the beginning of the Atlantic should be quite ok

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40 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Yes, in the last news they say he will get at least 100 nm south of the cape, and indeed the beginning of the Atlantic should be quite ok

Bummer not to see the rocks... but I guess he has already checked that box..... better conditions and the record is a good tradeoff.

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He will use about the same time from Cape Leeuwin to Cape Horn as Joyon did on his crewed Jules Verne Trophy record at 40days - and Joyon used about 13days home from there - while Coville used about 17 days...  

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Wgen you see how the weather hasn't played nice with him in the southern seas ...

Lots of time still could be shade on his record if he brings it home

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Entering the South Atlantic in a few hours with 1200 miles advantage, that is a good position.

This is his first attempt IIRC, Coville took 3 or 4 turns.

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It took Coville five attempts

https://www.ouest-france.fr/sport/voile/voile-thomas-coville-la-5e-tentative-sera-celle-de-l-exploit-4694037

 

With the Irens/Cabaret designed Sodebo (current Actual) :

2007 : He hit something around the Keguelens

2008 : 59 days 20 h

2011 : 61 days

with the current Sodebo :

2014 : he goes back after 14 days, too far behind, and no good weather ahead

2016 : the good one.

 

Note : Coville was also part of the crew that got the Jules Vernes in 97 with Kersauzon, and in 2010 with Cammas

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Any of you knows who (crew or skipper) got the most complete RTW (record breaking or not) ?

Might be jacques caraes or loic le mignon ?

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6 minutes ago, popo said:

Any of you knows who (crew or skipper) got the most complete RTW (record breaking or not) ?

Might be jacques caraes or loic le mignon ?

No I don't, but would be interested to know as well ! :) 

So Coville has 6 (the five above, plus he also did a Vendée in 2001, finished 6th)

Note : he was also on Groupama for the 2012 VOR with Cammas, but we only count the non stop RTW right ?

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According to wikipedia fr, Joyon has 4 :

2 solo (and records), one with the old sport elec, one with the sistership of first Sodebo, and 2 crew on ex groupama (one failed but completed, one succeeded)

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And also according to wikipedia FR

 Jean Le Cam also has 4 (3VG and 1 Barcelona world race.)

And Kersauson may also have 6 completed records/attempts :

89 : solo record

On the JV :

94 : completed attempt

95 and 96 : two attempts

97 : record

2004 : record

Edit : in his 89 solo record, he stopped two times

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Gabart just got the overall record for the Pacific : 5h59mn better than Crewed Joyon's Idec !

 

And :

 

2 days 8h 15 mn ahead of Coville.

Plus the beginning of the Atlantic looks really favorable ...

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3 hours ago, popo said:

Any of you knows who (crew or skipper) got the most complete RTW (record breaking or not) ?

Might be jacques caraes or loic le mignon ?

Important to assume non-stop in this I think. Otherwise there are a lot of VOR sailors with multiple.

Brian T must have 3 (2 x JV and a VG)

Coville must lead with 6 surely.

Aren't there some Ozzies who have just done multiple RTW voyages, not necessarily as part of a record or race?

Dee has 3 - 1 wrong way solo, VG and BWR

Jean-Pierre Dick has 5 or maybe 6. 3 or 4 VG and 2 x BWR.

 

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This is incredible...

He has the 2nd best time EVER from Ushant to Cape Horn (solo AND crewed attempts), just behind Joyon and his crew on their Jules Verne Trophy record; 29d 3h 15m vs. 26d 15h 45m.

But wait....

 

He just established the fastest South Pacific Ocean crossing of all time!!! Solo and crewed!!!

South of Tasmania to Cape Horn in 7d 15h 15 m, better than the current record by Joyon and crew again, in 7d 21h 13m.

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Can anyone discuss the strategy for moving up the atlantic. It looks like he should be able to hook into the low forming off of Argentina and rip right up the coast. How long he will be able to stay with that, and what happens after I am not so sure. From what I remember Sodebo was fast in this area, but based on the number of gybes put in, Francois has a good chance to continue to extend his lead.

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1 hour ago, Mizzmo said:

Can anyone discuss the strategy for moving up the atlantic. It looks like he should be able to hook into the low forming off of Argentina and rip right up the coast. How long he will be able to stay with that, and what happens after I am not so sure. From what I remember Sodebo was fast in this area, but based on the number of gybes put in, Francois has a good chance to continue to extend his lead.

 

Yes indeed, he should be able to take this high pressure system (it's a high not a low) on the East of it, and I guess he should be able to keep it at least 3 days going up (joining with another one) quite in the middle of the Atlantic (a good thing as they often tend to get stuck on the Brazilian coast going up), then there will be a tricky/interesting part to join the trades.

Coville had a foil issue I think going up (but maybe only in the North Atlantic don't  remember  exactly), and he finished very quickly but had to go quite East in the North Atlantic to round the Azores high and catch a low.

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It does look pretty good for the next 3 days where he will have a transition to make and a bit of upwind work but much better than Coville who was fairly slow in the South Atlantic: he "only" covered 2500 miles in the 7 days after rounding Horn and it looks like Gabart might do this in around 4 days...

It would take some serious luck with the weather to beat the crewed record but it's definitely possible as his performance up to now has shown.

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1 hour ago, Airwick said:

It does look pretty good for the next 3 days where he will have a transition to make and a bit of upwind work but much better than Coville who was fairly slow in the South Atlantic: he "only" covered 2500 miles in the 7 days after rounding Horn and it looks like Gabart might do this in around 4 days...

It would take some serious luck with the weather to beat the crewed record but it's definitely possible as his performance up to now has shown.

Fricking crazy!  Awesome! 

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He has just 11 days now to go 6600miles - thats 600nm average - to beat the overall - its possible- but Joyons crewed time from Cape H to home is the fastest ever - so to beat that time with 3 days is really hard. He blew that record in the Indian Ocean - but showed that its possible.

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33 minutes ago, SeaGul said:

He has just 11 days now to go 6600miles - thats 600nm average - to beat the overall - its possible- but Joyons crewed time from Cape H to home is the fastest ever - so to beat that time with 3 days is really hard. He blew that record in the Indian Ocean - but showed that its possible.

I would say that the weather blew that record, rather than saying "he blew that record...." which implies that he made an error which cost him an opportunity.  I couldn't see any way that he and his team could have got him through the weather he had any quicker.

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44 minutes ago, Tunnel Rat said:

I would say that the weather blew that record, rather than saying "he blew that record...." which implies that he made an error which cost him an opportunity.  I couldn't see any way that he and his team could have got him through the weather he had any quicker.

There was some moments where they could choose to go south to the rumbline - but decedid to go north. There was talk about ice - but a few miles after they went down south and even below the rumbline - so it seems that it could be done. But maybe there was a ice problem in a limited area...  a chance to take. 

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56 minutes ago, SeaGul said:

There was some moments where they could choose to go south to the rumbline - but decedid to go north. There was talk about ice - but a few miles after they went down south and even below the rumbline - so it seems that it could be done. But maybe there was a ice problem in a limited area...  a chance to take. 

This was about catching the "Madagascar/Mozanbique" low (and getting in front of it) or not, at one point they thought they could do it (so going North), but it didn't work, so they went South.

Maybe they could have pushed more and get it ... (and maybe break the boat in the process, with "ifs" you could put Paris in a bottle like we say in France).

But indeed if he did catch that one, he would have had a great Indian Ocean.

By the way it seems to me the forecasts changed a bit in a not favorable way at the +48h time stamp from now.

(there is now a no wind zone at +48h around 33south that was not really there before (there was a bridge).

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An interview of Gabart in "le Figaro" :

http://sport24.lefigaro.fr/voile/actualites/francois-gabart-au-figaro-j-ai-eu-peur-en-voyant-un-iceberg-887463

Not really anything new, saying for the next few days it should be ok, and then some transitions to manage.

By the way reading that, stumbled upon below JP Dick video interview :

http://video.lefigaro.fr/sport24/video/jean-pierre-dick-avec-les-foils-l-age-devient-une-limite/5655023883001/

Where he says he is stopping the IMOCA and Vendée Globe circuit, Yann Ellies will take over his current boat.

He is also saying that the IMOCA boats are getting more physical each generation (due to being faster,) and especially for moving the sails (btw something not really needed on the tris!), and that somehow there is an age limit ..

He says he will keep on doing some ocean racing, but does not say what.

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New news item on Macif site :

https://macifcourseaularge.com/actus/bascule-nouvel-episode/

About the upcoming route :

Quote

Un début d’Atlantique sud favorable

 

Point d’arrêt ni de ralentissement en vue pour le trimaran MACIF qui va encore, et pour au moins deux jours, profiter de forts, très forts vents de nord-ouest pour arrondir sa course loin dans l’est des îles Malouines, et rallier à grande vitesse les 30 et 40 degrés de latitude sud et le nord de l’Argentine. « L’Atlantique sud s’annonce musclé et rapide. » confirme François. « C’est une excellente nouvelle. Du vent fort et de la vitesse pendant deux ou trois jours, mais avec de la mer. Il faut faire attention au bateau et donner la priorité à la glisse. Il y aura des zones de transition à gérer dans le nord de l’Argentine…  Ce sera compliqué, mais j’ai grand hâte d’arriver vite dans les latitudes chaudes. »

So in summary : The South Atlantic should be "rough"(muscled litterally) and fast : wind and speed for the next two to three days up to 30° or 40° south, but with strong seas. They will need to be careful with the boat optimizing the "gliss"(surfing the swell). There will be transitions zones in Northern Argentina, it will be complicated but FG is eager to get to warmer latitudes.

 

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