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Hello all,

I wanted to tell you about a cool adventure that my friends and I have started. The 2018 Bermuda race has always been a goal of mine to do, turns out my friends shared the same interest. This past summer we began planning out the race, we figure that this will be the youngest crew to complete the race with an average age of 19. Our skipper may also be the youngest skipper at 18. All of us have been racing since before we can remember and between us have thousands of miles. We are taking the skippers' fathers boat, a 47-foot steel hulled vessel, not great for competitive racing unless it is blowing 30 but winning isn't everything. Since we are such a young crew we are trying to raise money from sailors who see this as a cool venture to get young sailors doing long distance races. Now here I am going to put on my solicitor's hat and ask that if you wish to help us out on the voyage to Bermuda this coming summer we have a go fund me page. (https://www.gofundme.com/newport-to-bermuda-race-2018?lang=en-US) Thank you for your time and if you have any tips, advise, or just want to wish us luck please leave a comment.

Thank you from the crew of Feo   

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Beer, popcorn, couch .........all ready

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So a practical question: the Bermuda race has a minimum experience level requirement of ocean racing amongst the crew. How do you all plan to meet that requirement?

 

additionally, please be more transparent about your budgeting. Sailors are a well off but thrifty lot. They want to know they'll be supporting you on an endeavor that could actually happen, rather than throwing good money after bad. This will be a significantly expensive endeavor, how are you planning to fund safety equipment, dockage in newport and Bermuda, food, your delivery home, etc etc etc. not to mention the not insignificant entry fee. How much have others pledged to contribute or is gofund me your only plan? 

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22 hours ago, A-NU-START said:

So a practical question: the Bermuda race has a minimum experience level requirement of ocean racing amongst the crew. How do you all plan to meet that requirement?

 

additionally, please be more transparent about your budgeting. Sailors are a well off but thrifty lot. They want to know they'll be supporting you on an endeavor that could actually happen, rather than throwing good money after bad. This will be a significantly expensive endeavor, how are you planning to fund safety equipment, dockage in newport and Bermuda, food, your delivery home, etc etc etc. not to mention the not insignificant entry fee. How much have others pledged to contribute or is gofund me your only plan? 

We have one crew member who has done the race before, one who has done the Halifax, two crew members who have done deliveries from Maine to Florida and gone through Bermuda. The boat has done the race before so all of the gear is to spec and has most of the safety gear. and the more expensive stuff we are borrowing from people who already have it and are not racing. entry fee will probably be covered mostly by the crew. money raised will go to food and dockage, as for the return the crew will be able to bring it back. We have made sure that we have enough experience to qualify and have worked with some people on staff to make sure we know what we need to do. 

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You seriously expect people to pay for your food. Really?

Given you would have to eat whether you do the race or not that seems amazing to me.

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3 minutes ago, DtM said:

You seriously expect people to pay for your food. Really?

Given you would have to eat whether you do the race or not that seems amazing to me.

Yes, we could work all year to get enough money to do the race and solely benefit from it and any potential publicity, but that doesn't help out the younger generation of sailors. A big part of this is to show that a young group of sailors with the help of the sailing community can go out and achieve success in one of the biggest offshore races in the world. We want this to help advance youth sailing, to encourage young sailors to compete in big races. Also, we do not expect that people will just want to give us a free ride to Bermuda that is why I am not on here begging people for money. If you feel like you this is something you wish to support you can donate or just give advice from previous races anything is helpful.  

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I applaud your efforts and certainly don't want to discourage you guys from trying, but the Bermuda race requirements are quite prescriptive.  The skipper, navigator, and watch captain must have done a previous Bermuda race or similar race IN THAT CAPACITY.  That is the tough part.  They don't invite people just because they want to do the race.  If anything I would be afraid that posts such as these as well as the go fund me site will undermine your credibility in the minds of the race organizers, and you will have an uphill fight to get your application for entry accepted without any of those issues.

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On 10/30/2017 at 1:50 PM, vtsail said:

I applaud your efforts and certainly don't want to discourage you guys from trying, but the Bermuda race requirements are quite prescriptive.  The skipper, navigator, and watch captain must have done a previous Bermuda race or similar race IN THAT CAPACITY.  That is the tough part.  They don't invite people just because they want to do the race.  If anything I would be afraid that posts such as these as well as the go fund me site will undermine your credibility in the minds of the race organizers, and you will have an uphill fight to get your application for entry accepted without any of those issues.

Thank you for the support! 

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Hi,

Good on you guys for wanting to do the race and I hope you get to the start line.  As a boat captain and skipper of a couple boats with lots of young and shifting crew, I understand the amount of work that goes into getting to the start line.  However, I see you plan on sailing the 47ft boat with only 6 crew??  While sailing with a young average age is commendable I would highly recommend a few more crew and maybe one or two more people with a few Bermuda Races under their belt. 

Think about watch systems and different roles on the boat.  Happy to chat with you.

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9 hours ago, SeanAOH said:

Hi,

Good on you guys for wanting to do the race and I hope you get to the start line.  As a boat captain and skipper of a couple boats with lots of young and shifting crew, I understand the amount of work that goes into getting to the start line.  However, I see you plan on sailing the 47ft boat with only 6 crew??  While sailing with a young average age is commendable I would highly recommend a few more crew and maybe one or two more people with a few Bermuda Races under their belt. 

Think about watch systems and different roles on the boat.  Happy to chat with you.

You tell 'em!

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First off, really awesome initiative by these guys. I really hope it works out for you. As a someone youngish with a fairly significant amount of offshore time, I would highly suggest bringing at least one coach. You could easily find someone under 25 who is experienced and able to help you guys out. This race is no joke and you may think you are totally prepared until you come across a situation you aren't prepared for.

Best of luck

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On ‎11‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 8:29 AM, Sent191 said:

First off, really awesome initiative by these guys. I really hope it works out for you. As a someone youngish with a fairly significant amount of offshore time, I would highly suggest bringing at least one coach. You could easily find someone under 25 who is experienced and able to help you guys out. This race is no joke and you may think you are totally prepared until you come across a situation you aren't prepared for.

Best of luck

I can definitely back up this sentiment.  Before the BDA 2014 we replaced almost all the running rigging and resurfaced the winch drums, among a thousand other boat prep items. A few days into the race while pumping the main pretty aggressively one morning, we started to notice that the winch drum was wearing through the cover on the continuous mainsheet in multiple places.  If we hadn't had someone who could splice in  a new section of different (tougher) double braid line, while sitting on the cockpit sole, while the everyone else went about their business, we would have certainly ended up at the least opportune time with a flogging main and a sheet in multiple useless pieces. It was really nice work too, perfectly tapered and everything, I've seen much worse out of rigging shops.

All of this is to say there are a lot of situations that aren't exactly "sailing" that make up ocean racing, you gotta be covered for the contingencies.

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1 hour ago, CrushDigital said:

All of this is to say there are a lot of situations that aren't exactly "sailing" that make up ocean racing, you gotta be covered for the contingencies.

Truth.  You'll need an engine guy, electrical guru, medical officer, etc.  A rigger on board is never a bad idea either. ;) 

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On 10/30/2017 at 1:50 PM, vtsail said:

the Bermuda race requirements are quite prescriptive.  The skipper, navigator, and watch captain must have done a previous Bermuda race or similar race IN THAT CAPACITY. 

 

That's not actually the case.  Direct from the NOR,

"4.2 To apply for an invitation, submit an Application for Entry (“AFE”) and a $50 nonrefundable fee on the SailGate entry system by April 1, 2018. If the Captain and Navigator did not complete the 2014, or enter the 2016, Newport Bermuda Race in their respective capacities, the application must include an Offshore Experience Form detailing the Captain’s, Navigator’s and Watch Captains’ recent offshore sailing experience. The Technical Committee may also require additional information if the boat has not previously been rated in her current configuration under the rating rule applicable to the division for which she applied. 4.3 The OA may extend invitations to those that apply, provided: (1) the Qualifications Committee approves the Captain’s and Navigator’s offshore experience; and (2) the Technical Committee approves the boat’s eligibility for at least one of the race’s divisions, which are described as follows:"

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On 11/17/2017 at 11:38 AM, Merit 25 said:

Truth.  You'll need an engine guy, electrical guru, medical officer, etc.  A rigger on board is never a bad idea either. ;) 

I hear "a man who stitches cloth together" is good, maybe a "guy who is good at knots", or one that "knows how to read maps". :rolleyes:

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On 10/25/2017 at 1:10 AM, Starkey said:

Yes, we could work all year to get enough money to do the race and solely benefit from it and any potential publicity, but that doesn't help out the younger generation of sailors. A big part of this is to show that a young group of sailors with the help of the sailing community can go out and achieve success in one of the biggest offshore races in the world. We want this to help advance youth sailing, to encourage young sailors to compete in big races. Also, we do not expect that people will just want to give us a free ride to Bermuda that is why I am not on here begging people for money. If you feel like you this is something you wish to support you can donate or just give advice from previous races anything is helpful.  

I suggest you take a different approach. You're not showing anyone of the younger generation anything by coming here asking for a handout, and just doing the race itself won't garner you much publicity.

Start vlogging your preparations and training, on YT (yeah, as though YT needs another vlogging channel, I know, I know...) and get contributions that way, through Patreon or whatever. If you want your efforts to have some lasting impact regarding getting young folks into sailing, then you have to document it. Kill two birds with one stone.

But one of you is going to have to get good at video editing. I'd rather chew broken glass than watch another poorly made sailing video.

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Starkey, please contact headambassador at bermudarace dot com and we can put you together with an experienced Ambassador who can assist you, guide you and steer you towards official answers and entering the race.

Please reference in your email the SA Forum was where we reached out to you.

P.S. - Was that you that attended the Boat Preparation Seminar Brewers Pilots Point?

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We are here in Maine, too, and wish you luck in your endeavor.  We are not willing to subsidize your trip, but we frequently have work you might do.   If you're interested in earning part of your budget, drop me a PM.

 

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You could probably make a good business case if you just ask your fathers to give you some money to go away and never return....

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6 hours ago, sshow bob said:

We are here in Maine, too, and wish you luck in your endeavor.  We are not willing to subsidize your trip, but we frequently have work you might do.   If you're interested in earning part of your budget, drop me a PM.

 

For what its worth, my comment wasn't intended to be snarky - if you guys are looking for the opportunity to earn the money you need to race, please feel free to reach out to me by PM.

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A very kind offer Bob, good on you.  Interested to see if they take it up. 

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Oh what a surprise !!

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On 1/14/2018 at 10:00 PM, sshow bob said:

For what its worth, my comment wasn't intended to be snarky - if you guys are looking for the opportunity to earn the money you need to race, please feel free to reach out to me by PM.

Hi,

sorry for the late response, I haven't checked the thread in a while. Thank you for the support and where in Maine are you located? 

Sorry for the late response haven't been  

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Starkey

Best of luck with starting a new Bermuda Race endeavor. Just make sure you invest in as much knowledge/learning/tools as you possibly can before getting on the start line.
May be worth looking into some training or info re: weather, Gulf stream, routing, etc since it is your first race. I know there is a lot out there for ocean safety/boat prep, but knowing about the weather would be really good for you. I believe Commanders Weather will be doing a seminar in April that is reasonably priced - May be a good thing for 1 or 2 of your crew to look into. 
Best of luck! And, crowdfunding is a fantastic tool of the modern generation. Use it to your advantage (there will be plenty of people who want to see you succeed) and politely ignore the people who tell you otherwise (unfortunately there will also be plenty of people who wish you wouldn't succeed because "it was harder back in my day"). 

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Hello Starkey and I wish I had your guts and ambition at your age.  As a father with kids around your age, please allow me to share some wisdom.  First, wether you should or should do the race could be your biggest decision. The decision to NOT race is often harder to make..

Make a big list of the following, Known Knowns, Known Unknown, and Unknown Unknown.   KK = Race date, course, weather up to 48 hours, Gulf Stream, etc.  KU = what sea sickness meds are best, can everyone drive offshore, what watch schedule worked best, how much water you need, can you live together for 5 days?  Try to move all the KU to the KK list.

UU = Bad things happen.  Something will break, someone will make a mistake, something will be tougher then you expected.  Be honest, not optimistic.  Who is mechanically inclined?  Who works well under pressure?  Who can be a bit of a loose cannon?, Who is your problem solver?  

Every sailor who has gone offshore can give you 10 things that went wrong during the voyage.  While you may not have a rigger onboard, do you have a person who could read a splicing sheet and spend 3 hours fixing the issue?  

Ping me if you have any questions, good luck

 

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^^^^^^^

That's some good advice right there.

OP, What class are you entering?

 

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On 1/28/2018 at 10:12 PM, Special Ed said:

Hello Starkey and I wish I had your guts and ambition at your age.  As a father with kids around your age, please allow me to share some wisdom.  First, wether you should or should do the race could be your biggest decision. The decision to NOT race is often harder to make..

Make a big list of the following, Known Knowns, Known Unknown, and Unknown Unknown.   KK = Race date, course, weather up to 48 hours, Gulf Stream, etc.  KU = what sea sickness meds are best, can everyone drive offshore, what watch schedule worked best, how much water you need, can you live together for 5 days?  Try to move all the KU to the KK list.

UU = Bad things happen.  Something will break, someone will make a mistake, something will be tougher then you expected.  Be honest, not optimistic.  Who is mechanically inclined?  Who works well under pressure?  Who can be a bit of a loose cannon?, Who is your problem solver?  

Every sailor who has gone offshore can give you 10 things that went wrong during the voyage.  While you may not have a rigger onboard, do you have a person who could read a splicing sheet and spend 3 hours fixing the issue?  

Ping me if you have any questions, good luck

 

Thank you for the advice! 

 

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No one has mentioned food yet.

I would recommend making a tentative meal plan, then cook a few dishes. See what the portions work out to and tweak accordingly. Record the dry volumes of things... don't forget some veggies.

Frozen food can keep in an icebox / cooler for long periods of time if you put some dry ice in with it. If you plan to take frozen food with you it is best to put dry ice, or ice in the coolers the day before you transfer food into them. Put new stuff in race day. It is easiest to have all meals / food for the day pre organized so that it is one less thing to have to think about. You could also go the freeze dried route, but that can be expensive to do the whole race on. Make sure that you factor water for cooking into what you take. If there is ANY sea state cook with your foulies on, even when it is glassy out i still do this. I dropped a jet boil element on myself and my pants saved me from a burn on day 2 in the last edition, also things can also splash.

Have a plan for what to do with waste, as well as how to minimize it where possible. I STRONGLY disagree with throwing stuff overboard.

This is one of those KK that special ed was talking about. Not having good food sucks. A messy boat also sucks and can be demoralizing.

24 with a TR, Fastnet and Bermuda (plus the delivery back) under my belt. Feel free to ping me if you have any questions about watch schedules, coexisting strategies, what I bring offshore etc. 

 

Good luck!

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Food:

Over the years 30+ of offshore racing, we have gone simpler and simpler. We have devolved to mostly grab and go options as opposed to group eating on the rail for short races like Bermuda. 4 days, 8 crew, 4 hour watches, no one wants to have to cook something anymore, even just warming up a pot of chili mac or something equally distasteful meant serving and clean up etc. I know many will go on about the morale lifting benefits of a hot meal on a cold night, but on such a short race, with maybe some weather on 1 or 2 days, we have arrived at the conclusion that easier is preferred.

In the 2016 event we picked up a bunch of carryout pizzas. We split them up into ziplocks a piece or 2 per and it made for an easy grab after coming off watch. Packaged lunch meat and rolls for lunches, crunchies, powerbars and chocolate etc. Bagels and cream cheese (or cold pizza) for breakfast and life is easy. It is only 4 or so days.

For drinks, try freezing water and gatorade etc. and filling a cooler completely. Tape that cooler closed and do not open for the first couple of days. You will still have ice cold drinks on day 3 even if you do not have a fridge.

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Did you guys get an invite for entry? 

Food:

IMO don’t do freeze dried, the weight savings isn’t worth it in most boats, certainly not the one you guys are racing on.

I’m assuming that your boat has an oven but this applies anyway.

Dont bring Gatorade or any of that, expect maybe some energy drinks for those that prefer over coffee. Instead have Gatorade or lemonade powder. Something to help with electrolytes.

i tend to a lot one half gallon per person per day of water.

meals: pre-prepared, packaged, individualized unless you are doing tray food like lasagna or caserole(also a good route), and if possibly pre cooked so you are just heating it up.

i don’t agree with Lono. The effect of a hot meal on crew morale is huge especially if you are new to ocean/Offshore racing. If done properly, hot meals can be extremely easy and obviously taste way better.

quick bites: granola barss, trail mix, twizlers, think easy to grab and not messy to eat.

a bit on organization: have everyone’s bowls, spoons, cups etc. labeled and kept together. Cloth pouches are good for this. Make sure to clean them after you eat! I know people often don’t want to but it can really suck if you don’t. 

If you are cooking on a stovetop or similar, wear your foulies. I know it’s hot but it’s safer.

hope you guys got this thing moving.

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24 minutes ago, Sent191 said:

Did you guys get an invite for entry? 

Food:

IMO don’t do freeze dried, the weight savings isn’t worth it in most boats, certainly not the one you guys are racing on.

I’m assuming that your boat has an oven but this applies anyway.

Dont bring Gatorade or any of that, expect maybe some energy drinks for those that prefer over coffee. Instead have Gatorade or lemonade powder. Something to help with electrolytes.

i tend to a lot one half gallon per person per day of water.

meals: pre-prepared, packaged, individualized unless you are doing tray food like lasagna or caserole(also a good route), and if possibly pre cooked so you are just heating it up.

i don’t agree with Lono. The effect of a hot meal on crew morale is huge especially if you are new to ocean/Offshore racing. If done properly, hot meals can be extremely easy and obviously taste way better.

quick bites: granola barss, trail mix, twizlers, think easy to grab and not messy to eat.

a bit on organization: have everyone’s bowls, spoons, cups etc. labeled and kept together. Cloth pouches are good for this. Make sure to clean them after you eat! I know people often don’t want to but it can really suck if you don’t. 

If you are cooking on a stovetop or similar, wear your foulies. I know it’s hot but it’s safer.

hope you guys got this thing moving.

 

Good thing we're getting the extensive rundown on the fine points of offshore sailing from a 19 year old with the extensive offshore experience of some ALIRs and a vineyard. 

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4 hours ago, jackolantern said:

 

Good thing we're getting the extensive rundown on the fine points of offshore sailing from a 19 year old with the extensive offshore experience of some ALIRs and a vineyard. 

A bit harsh. There’s only like a million opinions on this subject.

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6 hours ago, Lono said:

Food:

Over the years 30+ of offshore racing, we have gone simpler and simpler. We have devolved to mostly grab and go options as opposed to group eating on the rail for short races like Bermuda. 4 days, 8 crew, 4 hour watches, no one wants to have to cook something anymore, even just warming up a pot of chili mac or something equally distasteful meant serving and clean up etc. I know many will go on about the morale lifting benefits of a hot meal on a cold night, but on such a short race, with maybe some weather on 1 or 2 days, we have arrived at the conclusion that easier is preferred.

In the 2016 event we picked up a bunch of carryout pizzas. We split them up into ziplocks a piece or 2 per and it made for an easy grab after coming off watch. Packaged lunch meat and rolls for lunches, crunchies, powerbars and chocolate etc. Bagels and cream cheese (or cold pizza) for breakfast and life is easy. It is only 4 or so days.

For drinks, try freezing water and gatorade etc. and filling a cooler completely. Tape that cooler closed and do not open for the first couple of days. You will still have ice cold drinks on day 3 even if you do not have a fridge.

I like the frozen beverages + sealed cooler. Way easier than my ideas.

And you are correct; simpler is always better. 

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4 minutes ago, A Boy Named Stu said:

I like the frozen beverages + sealed cooler. Way easier than my ideas.

And you are correct; simpler is always better. 

I definitely agree with frozen Bevs just make sure you remember to thaw them.

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Young American just announced their entries.  (I am part of the ogranization.)  Gambler the R/P 63 will be a big step up from High Noon and will be a handfull.  Good news is the crew is 2 years older, we have added some experianced sailors and will be taking one more coach.  Plan is to sail with 14 juniors and 4 coaches on Gambler.  Ticket to Ride will be a great boat for the High School aged sailors.  Fully optimzied Swan 45, not a bad ride at all.
 

 

5ac4d1b6eafa6_press1copy.png.4d462e60c670f5d4f07dc2d16838c721.png9.jpg.0b731eb4b82142da19502642991bed50.jpg
 

Young American Sailing Academy to Sail Newport Bermuda Race
    
Entering Two Boats Crewed by Twenty-Two Juniors

RYE, NY (April 4, 2018) - The Young American Sailing Academy (YASA) announces two entries for the 2018 edition of the Newport Bermuda Race (NBR).  Racing two boats builds on the success of the team’s single-boat effort in the 2016 Bermuda Race.  Entering a second boat brings to 22 the number of young sailors able to improve their offshore skills in the iconic 638-mile offshore race.

Partnering with the USMMA Sailing Foundation, the team will be sailing the 63-foot mini-maxi, Gambler USA 60010 (ex Lucky, ex Loki), crewed by the more experienced YASA sailors aged 17-23.  The second race boat is the Swan 45, Ticket to Ride USA 45454 (ex Lir), owned by Edward D. Whitmore, and will be crewed by sailors aged 15-18; most of these sailors have been actively sailing the team’s J/105 Young American for the past three years in all of the local distance races such as Block Island Race, Vineyard Race, Ida Lewis Distance Race, and Around Long Island Race.

The highly successful High Noon 2016 NBR campaign was made possible with the support of the USMMA Sailing Foundation and Steve and Heidi Benjamin.  High Noon took home seven awards, including 1st to finish St. David’s and Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Divisions, 1st in class, 3rd overall ORR, winner of the inaugural Stephens Brothers Youth Trophy, and winner of the Onion Patch Series.  Many of the same crew of High Noon will be aboard Gambler, including the professional sailor and team coach Guillermo Altadill.

Gambler is a recent donation to USMMA Sailing Foundation and will provide a larger and more advanced racing platform for the junior offshore sailors.  “We are thrilled to be providing Gambler to this accomplished race team of young offshore sailors,” said Ralf Steitz, president of the Foundation.  “Putting high performance boats and equipment in the hands of young sailors is the way to advance the next generation of US sailors in the sport of offshore ocean racing.” 

Ticket to Ride is a new boat for Whitmore and he is generously partnering with the YASA team in its goals of developing more US offshore sailors.  “I’m excited to be racing to Bermuda with the YASA Team,” said Whitmore.  “They may be young, but they already have big boat experience and I feel confident we will have a great race.”

“Sailing High Noon in the 2016 Newport Bermuda was a fantastic milestone for us in delivering on our mission to help create a new generation of offshore sailors,” said Peter Becker, president of the Young American Sailing Academy.  “On behalf of YASA, we would like to thank the USMMA Foundation, Ralf Steitz, Ed Whitmore, Rob Alexander, and Joe Cooper, who are all enthusiastically supporting the effort and making it possible for the team to take this next step forward.”

About Young American Sailing Academy, Inc.:

The Young American Sailing Academy is a not-for-profit whose mission is to develop a new generation of American offshore sailors by working with high school and college aged junior sailors to give them the tools required to compete at the highest level in the sport of ocean racing.  The goal is to field winning entries in premier national and international sailing events including the potential future Olympic class of offshore sailing.  The Young American team has more than six years of experience racing coastal and offshore events with numerous and notable victories such as the Block Island Race, Vineyard Race, and Newport Bermuda Race.  For more information please visit the website yasailing.org.

About USMMA Sailing Foundation, Inc.:

The USMMA Sailing Foundation is a 501c3 public charity specializing in vessel donations used for maritime education programs.  The Foundation president, Ralf Steitz, is a world-class sailor and the driving force behind the success of the Foundation and its education initiatives.  For more information please visit the website usmmasailingfoundation.org.

 

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Wow.  Impressive step up.  Will be rooting for the kids!

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In Newport starting tomorrow.  Thirsty anarchists send me a PM.

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Posted (edited)

Forty years ago. First long I.O.R, U.L.D.B on the East Coast (mouth full) to start the trend to lighter, faster, more Fun sleds. At a reasonable cost; not anymore and not tomorrow. 

20180614_221047_resized.jpg

Edited by Tanton Y_M

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I was wondering when Rambler would pass the Volvo 70's?  Ahead now, then the 70's, a Maxi 72, then the Gunboats.

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19 minutes ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Rambler at the start.

20180615_160801_resized.jpg

 

Does George drive, or has a pro for that?

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George does drive, but he's getting on so not sure how long his stints are. 

 

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So, 5 boats have finished and Spookie is 104 NM to go still, did Rambler set a new record?  And why are the other Gunboats so far back?

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Moo records this year, except number of boats taking longer than five days.

The high pressure ridge was uncrossable, six boats beat it to forming and made decent time. The rest of the fleet is still wallowing.

 

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13 hours ago, billy backstay said:

So, 5 boats have finished and Spookie is 104 NM to go still, did Rambler set a new record?  And why are the other Gunboats so far back?

If Rambler set a record it would be for her slowest NB race ever

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So the article on the race on Wikipedia is listed as having disputed neutrality. Which is basically fair because it's essentially the content from the race website without any 3rd party support. I'm not sure anyone cares, but it would be nice have an article that is more complete and balanced, like the Fastnet Race entry. When (if) I have extra time I may start making it more robust. Help is welcome. 

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12 hours ago, Moonduster said:

This was R88's first Bermuda race

There you go - the slowest ever ;)

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But also its fastest and therefore its personal record.:P

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22 hours ago, 2Newts said:

So the article on the race on Wikipedia is listed as having disputed neutrality. Which is basically fair because it's essentially the content from the race website without any 3rd party support. I'm not sure anyone cares, but it would be nice have an article that is more complete and balanced, like the Fastnet Race entry. When (if) I have extra time I may start making it more robust. Help is welcome. 

Does anyone know where the results for prior years can be found?

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