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Sarurday 4th indeed looks like an ok window, I wonder if Gabard will also take it, they told me on twitter they were looking at it

 

Edit : And Macif in fact just went into Orange code 

So if they take this one, Spindrift will clearly start later as their stand by starts on the 6th

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So geovoile and great circle are getting feeds from all (?) the big ocean efforts. Hope politics will allow showing them all on a single tracker, with links to each boats home-hosted stats.

 

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and here is a guy, Alain Maignan, who is doing he same thing on his 36 foot Beneteau. Please try to follow him, too. Very special guy. I met him on the dock at La Trinite before he started and asked him why he was going to do it the wrong way round. „Because I did it the other way 12 years before“ he said. https://alainmaignan.wordpress.com

the page unfortunately is only in french but there is a tracker and every second day they are reporting what´s going on. At the Moment his watermaker is out of order and he´s trying to repair it. I think he deserves the same respect as all these super pros.

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There's a problem on actual (or with the tracker), heading NW right now

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Ah shit, the result of the bet on crossing the macif route longitude is meaningless now :(

hope he will have time to restart !

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Restart time limit? Thought that was the Jules Verne or . . .  

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No there is no restart time limit, even for the Jules Verne if you go back to the start.

And as he is heading first to the Horn, I'm not sure he has the same constraints as the "normal" tour, in fact he might go North of Australia to do most of the pacific and Indian Ocean in the trades.(I've seen that somewhere cannot remember where)

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23 hours ago, stief said:

Thanks for that. 

Also L'Eau Commotion https://tracker.ee

Where is he going? Up to Ushant and back down south?

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4 hours ago, yl75 said:

No there is no restart time limit, even for the Jules Verne if you go back to the start.

And as he is heading first to the Horn, I'm not sure he has the same constraints as the "normal" tour, in fact he might go North of Australia to do most of the pacific and Indian Ocean in the trades.(I've seen that somewhere cannot remember where)

Don’t´think that anyone doing it the wrong way round is going north of Australia. You would have to go to far north. except some real strange weather. 

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44 minutes ago, ET1 said:

Where is he going? Up to Ushant and back down south?

Not sure (haven't read all the blogs, and need to check reqs for the WSSRC records). Here he says the WSSRC recorded his start. 

Quote

Well it's official.
Duncan van Woerden from the WSSRC took the time at 10.18.53 as I drifted across the line and just as the faintest 4 knots of Northerly breeze gently filled the sails.

http://www.sailblogs.com/member/leaucommotion/428603

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Translation of the post by Stief: Actual has broken its main sheet traveler and is heading back...

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7 hours ago, ET1 said:

Don’t´think that anyone doing it the wrong way round is going north of Australia. You would have to go to far north. except some real strange weather. 

The tracker had projected rumb north of New Zeland and south of Australia, going thru the strait with Tasmania.

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12 hours ago, yl75 said:

Ah shit, the result of the bet on crossing the macif route longitude is meaningless now :(

hope he will have time to restart !

It should, and a good enough window for him is quite possible, after all it's a first for a multihull.

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ACTUAL ULTIM READY TO LEAVE

gtrans:

Quote

A little more than 30 hours after their return to Trinité-sur-Mer for repair, Yves le Blevec and Actual Ultim are again in the starting blocks.

With eyes fixed on the weather, Christian Dumard and Yves le Blevec observe the most favorable situation to take the start of the Tour du Monde attempt at l'Envers again.

 

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On 2017-11-04 at 4:48 PM, ET1 said:

and here is a guy, Alain Maignan, who is doing he same thing on his 36 foot Beneteau. Please try to follow him, too. Very special guy. I met him on the dock at La Trinite before he started and asked him why he was going to do it the wrong way round. „Because I did it the other way 12 years before“ he said. https://alainmaignan.wordpress.com

the page unfortunately is only in french but there is a tracker and every second day they are reporting what´s going on. At the Moment his watermaker is out of order and he´s trying to repair it. I think he deserves the same respect as all these super pros.

Just checked Alain's tracker, wondering if might get to chat with a super pro on a VO65, but no. Next chance might be a crossing in the Southern Ocean. Respect and safe sailing to  all.

5a11914f09cc1_ScreenShot2017-11-19at8_03_33AM.png.c712ad84cab166808d0206b5e16bb4ec.png

5a11915014b5f_ScreenShot2017-11-19at8_06_36AM.png.84c91e0a7a24fecfe37efffb9d156b49.png

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The North Atlantic and the trades are really messed up right now, especially with a low system appearing very south (Azores latitude) around next Friday/Saturday (looking at windy).

It seems to recover a bit around wednesday 29 Thursday 30, maybe a window around that time ...

(same for Spindrift 2)

 

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Bing trans: "Code ORANGE: @yvesleblevec, the Actual Ultim skipper could cross the starting line of the World Tour in reverse, in the Bay of Quiberon, in the next 72 hours "

 

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Wow, so he is thinking about going west of that very southern low I guess, and then having the trades recover. Quite an unusual window for going down the North Atlantic, but somehow for the record he is chasing, having a "perfect" window doesn't matter as much.

 

actual.jpeg

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Spindrift also in Orange code, but qualifying the poissibility as "small" with another one next week :

 

 

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Think you saw the really detailed procedure for go/no go described in the Spindrift site (takes too long to load to check)

Wonder if Actual will follow that playbook, at least for the Atlantic descent

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yes, saw that, but it's getting late for a come back if the window does not work.

(spindrift site is really a mess to navigate, don't like these "wanting to be modern" site designs at all)

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Yves Le Blevec will start tomorrow afternoon.

 

Really a peculiar window !

With a very southern low at the Azores level (that he will most probably go west of).

And the trades totally messed up in the South Atlantic

But they think that they will have recovered by the time he gets there ?

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He's the first one to do that so ... no need for a good window ...

Just go.

I'm not sure anybody will really give a try at this record before long ...

I don't know how he is sponsorship-wise, but maybe he has to "put one in the bag" if he wants it to last ..n

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3 minutes ago, popo said:

He's the first one to do that so ... no need for a good window ...

Just go.

I'm not sure anybody will really give a try at this record before long ...

I don't know how he is sponsorship-wise, but maybe he has to "put one in the bag" if he wants it to last ..n

Yes clearly, it doesn't matter that much for him, and Spindrift is not taking it by the way :

 

 

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Thanks semelis. Start time was 16h55'28.   Christian Dumard, router. From the gtrans of the news

Quote

"It's about the same weather pattern as the first departure (November 4 last), it will allow him to double the course Finisterre tomorrow morning," says Christian Dumard, Yves router. "He'll go quiet, time to get in the leg. He should be able to be in Ecuador in about ten days. "

Anyone suggest a good link to his router?

Best wishes for a great run.

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28 minutes ago, ET1 said:

here we go

https://www.teamactual.eu/la-cartographie/

Sad to say: My guy Alain Maignan has given up and is going back to La trinity. Something broke, can´t translate what they are writing. Maybe someone can have a look here and translate.

He hit something, probably a whale, and a "varangue" (bottom frame ?  rib ?), not sure of the exact word,  the transversal pieces on the bottom of the boat to make it stronger, has major failure signs in it. So he dropped all his sails and has made some repairs/stratification.

varangue-fissurc3a9e.jpg

 

 

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I believe the best translation is Frame, indeed. A structural transverse re-enforcement of the hull around the keel attachment area to spread out the loads over the hull structure and skin.

 

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A question for the experts:

Does someone knows why Yves le Blevec does not leave from Ushant, but instead from La Trinité sur Mer, his home port? Is there a different rule for the validation of a "reverse" RTW record? Do you "just" need to leave from far enough North?

 

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The Jules Verne Trophy has defined the start and end point between lighthouses.
For the other direction its just WSSRC rules.

Quote

26.1.a. RTW - Round the World, eastbound and westbound 21600NM. 2 separate records.
To sail around the World, a vessel must start from and return to the same point, must cross all meridians of longitude and must cross the Equator. It may cross some but not all meridians more than once (i.e. two roundings of Antarctica do not count). The shortest orthodromic track of the vessel must be at least 21,600 nautical miles in length calculated based on a 'perfect sphere'. In calculating this distance, it is to be assumed that the vessel will sail around Antarctica in latitude 63 degrees south. 
A vessel starting from any point where the direct orthodromic distance is too short shall pass one single island or other fixed point on a required side so as to lengthen his orthodromic track to the minimum distance.
No starting point will be permitted more south than 45 ° south.
1 degree of longitude at 63 degrees south will be taken as 27.24NM

 

No particular need to make it more complicated. Perhaps times get good enough for someone to sponsor an reverse Jules Verne Trophy. :) 
Current outright record seems to be from 2004. 122 days and change, Jean Luc Van Den Heede singlehanded. Dee Caffari took 178 days in 2006 for the womans record.

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Cool. Didn't expect we'd see some vids:

 "Translated from French by Bing: The Bay of Biscay is already in the wake of the https://youtu.be/-AuSBz9CIzE . Yves the Blevec quickly adopted a navigation pace to deal with the very conditions of last night:"

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21 hours ago, ET1 said:

here we go

https://www.teamactual.eu/la-cartographie/

Sad to say: My guy Alain Maignan has given up and is going back to La trinity. Something broke, can´t translate what they are writing. Maybe someone can have a look here and translate.

[slight thread hijack] Well, the other underdog in L'Eau Commotion [English/French pun on 'locomotion' for EALers] is still underway, and his English writing is pretty good. Using Hawkins to get  to Cape Verde got a chuckle, and maybe a note to read his blogs more often.

Quote

23 November 2017 | 480 Miles to Santo Antao in the Cape Verde Islands

12:00 Noon Thursday 23rd November 2017 ( UTC-2) By careful inspection of the above latitude you can see that we are now firmly established in the tropics which is my excuse for going troppo. As I am going about extracting myself from one of those Blue Holes which seem so difficult to escape I am reminded of that fairly recent fad in Physics the Black Hole. How the Black Hole was invented is a fairly straight forward application of the Law of Universal Gravitation which states that everything in the universe is attracted to everything else, according to a four hundred year old formula promulgated by Isaac Newton. Now observations of distant Galaxies has shown clearly that this formula is incorrect which poses a scientific conundrum : do you admit that the very basis of scientific knowledge, also called The Laws of Physics, is wrong or do you use that very same formula to invent something that cannot be seen or measured, in other words the Black Hole. A Circular Argument indeed. Now when this phantasmagoria was invented it stated that the gravitational attraction was so strong that nothing, not even light, could escape. But then along came my Saviour, Richard Hawkings. The scientific literati are promoting his theory to the Grandees of Stockholm that by the splitting of a particle that does not exist into two parts, one of which exists in a positive sense and one which exists in a negative sense this latter is absorbed by the Black Hole which in the carefully calculated time frame of several trillion billion years eventually dissipates till it is no more. So in a similar but less grandiose time frame I have conjured up out of nowhere something that previously did not exist, namely the faintest zephyr of a breeze and by careful manipulation of the facts and the sails am now once again underway towards the Cape Verde Islands.

So when a context for the super pros (as you said before) is needed, we can always go to Aussie Bill Hatfield's wrong way journey. /thread hijack

Back to Actual 

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So far so good.

He is now at the latitude of Madeira... upwind...

The tricky part seems to be between the latitudes of Canary Islands and Cabo Verde Islands, where he will have to go through a zone of VERY light wind... His router states that the traditional Trade Winds are non-existent... but that the Doldrums are also almost non-existent... So maybe he will be slow soon but not so slow through the Doldrums.

From the article on his web site, www.teamactual.eu , Yves Le Blévec seems very composed and calm. "Take one day at a time", "no rush in the maneuvres"... Basically, look after yourself, look after the boat; it is a loooong trip...

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It seems like the doldrums have migrated north :) 

And all of this upwind now ... Spindrift II needs much better conditions if they want to make the tour in 40 days !

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Next Friday looks like sort of a window maybe for Spindrift, and with an area close to the African coast establishing itself to pass the no wind area afterwards.

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not sure when exactly they'll be at cape horn, but the weather will most certainly suck. I guess they'll head north after that and have decent trade winds...assuming they're not going for the shorter and more dangerous southerly route 

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Nearing the equator after 8 days, brazilian coast looks ok, and  later things seem to arrange them self for the argentinian part.

Cape Horn will be tricky, Gitana XIII catamaran had to wait 5 and 1/2 days for the weather to allow it during Lemonchois record setting of the  New York - San Francisco route in 2008.

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Le Blevec will have some complicated transitions ahead, 4 days ago he writed:

"La fin de semaine s’annonce compliquée avec beaucoup de transitions et donc beaucoup de manœuvres. Il faudra bien anticiper chacune d’elle. Avec Christian, on se positionne longtemps à l’avance afin de trouver un bon timing entre chaque manœuvre. Le plus délicat c’est le changement de voile d’avant et notamment de gennaker qui demande beaucoup d’énergie. Il faut compter près d’une heure entre le moment où tu commences à abattre pour pouvoir affaler et celui où tu reprends ta route. Il faut bien réfléchir avant de décider de changer de voile, éviter de se fatiguer et de prendre des risques pour rien. "

"The weekend promises to be complicated with many transitions and so many maneuvers. It will be necessary to anticipate each of them. With Christian, we position ourselves well in advance to find a good timing between each maneuver. The most delicate is the change of the fore sails  and especially the gennaker which requires a lot of energy. It takes almost one hour between the moment you start to bear away to be able to haul down and the moment when you resume your route. One must think carefully before deciding to change the sail, avoid getting tired and take risks for nothing."

And it looks like this will be the case.

 

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If le Blevec manages to get to Cape Horn in 3 days it seems there would be a good chance to enter the Pacific without delay.

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I was optimistic. From the site news:

"Après l’Uruguay, viendra l’Argentine, puis les îles Falkland et, bien sûr, Ushuaia… juste avant le Cap Horn que l’Ultim Actual devrait approcher entre le 13 et le 15 décembre.

« L’approche du Cap Horn reste floue », précise Christian Dumard. « Les conditions varient beaucoup d’un modèle météo à l’autre. On surveille surtout ce qui se passe après le cap pour voir si une fenêtre s’ouvre permettant à Yves de se dégager rapidement des montagnes qui longent la côte du Chili et éviter les vents de nord-ouest qui peuvent être très violents dans cette région. »"

After Uruguay Argentina will come, then Falkland Islands and of course Ushuaia ... just before Cape Horn that Ultim Actual should approach between December 13th and 15th.

<<The approach of Cape Horn is still fuzzy>>, says Christian Dumard. <<The conditions change a lot from one weather model to another. We are checking mostly what's happening after the Cape, to see if a window opens allowing Yves to get rid of the mountains along the Chilean coast and avoid the north-west winds that can be very violent in this region.>>

They comment too that he is already going in the reverse direction, or he would have take the low he encountered 2 days ago and follow it to the east.

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Just noticed that the reference route on the tracker is now "officially" above New Zealand, has it been like that for a long time ?

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Strange, didn't notice that before on the tracker, it was not there at the beginning right ?

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Yes ! :) And hope spindrift will start soon, they republisef a "code red" today on twitter, so no start before 4 days.

But Le Blévec tour is really going to be very interesting, as I guess he will no go "up to the trades", but try to find some route around 30° 40* South, and I was wondering : do the high pressure system in the south Pacific have "names" and   somehow stable postions, like the Santa Helena high in the South Atlantic, and the Azores High in the North Atlantic ?

Right now there are two of them : one west of chili around 100 west and 30° south, and one closer to NZ around 150 w and 37 south, are these "classical ones", do they have names ?

 

For Spindrift next Friday looks "ok", with a rather good start, established trades, and normally the doldrums stuck to the east once they get there, not sure about the South Atlantic though.

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looks very tricky. North to the trades, and suddenly you are doing huge amount of extra miles and going too far south you'll find yourself stuck on the antarctic 

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On 12/12/2017 at 1:04 AM, yl75 said:

Yes ! :) And hope spindrift will start soon, they republisef a "code red" today on twitter, so no start before 4 days.

But Le Blévec tour is really going to be very interesting, as I guess he will no go "up to the trades", but try to find some route around 30° 40* South, and I was wondering : do the high pressure system in the south Pacific have "names" and   somehow stable postions, like the Santa Helena high in the South Atlantic, and the Azores High in the North Atlantic ?

Right now there are two of them : one west of chili around 100 west and 30° south, and one closer to NZ around 150 w and 37 south, are these "classical ones", do they have names ?

 

For Spindrift next Friday looks "ok", with a rather good start, established trades, and normally the doldrums stuck to the east once they get there, not sure about the South Atlantic though.

Friday is very close to Saturday ....... Good that the start-finish line is that wide :)

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Seems Blevec / his twitter account holder is asking for words of encouragement as he approaches the Horn. I 'liked' the tweet, but not sure I could tweet a relevant message. 

 

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Good luck with passing this difficult part of the voyage

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Last tracker update was 03:20 UTC almost 3h ago. :wacko:

Social media silent for ~4h.
The day is staring in Europe so there will be news soon.

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Not even a day after rounding cap horn ...

Wow

 

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I guess it is testimonial of the pounding that the boat take going the "wrong" way, but on the other hand this is far from being a new boat, some fatigue in the beams not noticed ?

I wonder whether they will be able to save the boat.

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problem with these particular boats.  Sidney Gavinet had the sistership OMAN AIR and broke the crossbeam and capsized as well.

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Pictures are starting to come in.
Arrival at the airport, walking and talking on his own:

 

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Years ago a friend of mine and I were helping Coville prepare for the W to E Atlantic record and we chatted about her using his boat or the old B&Q for the wrong way record.  He didn't seem to think these boats were right for such a long slog to windward and they were designed for the downwind, eastbound course, mentioning hull design and beams, etc...  That said, it would be cool to see what a big multihull designed for the upwind course would look like.

Glad to see Yves is safe.  Terrible news for his boat though.  Hopefully they will attempt to rescue it. 

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Now that we know the sailor is safe, anyone having a guess how the boat ended up like that as in pic of post #79?

The boat sailed in starboard tack with norherly wind based on the tracker. That means the port ama was on the southern side of the boat. The port ama breaks off the beams, and the windward starboard ama flies over mainhull during capsize event ending up on the southern side of the mainhull. Now both amas are on the same southern side of mainhull. How does the port ama end up on the opposite side than the other one still fixed to the boat?

If the tramp hold it together with the boat, wouldn't that have prevented the boat from capsizing?

Did the ama break loose as a result of capsize rather then being the cause of it? That would explain why the amas are on opposite sides of the main hull.

 

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Beam breaks, boat starts to roll, loose ama provides no righting moment, but is still buouyant so floats closer to main hull, gets drug/pushed under main hull by all the attached shit, including mast, floats back to surface on port side.

Hard to believe it's worth salvaging after its all beat to shit.

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I assume the Chilean Navy were well aware of the record attempt, but still the reaction time have been superb. 

1 hour ago, NotSoFast said:

Now that we know the sailor is safe, anyone having a guess how the boat ended up like that as in pic of post #79?

The boat sailed in starboard tack with norherly wind based on the tracker. That means the port ama was on the southern side of the boat. The port ama breaks off the beams, and the windward starboard ama flies over mainhull during capsize event ending up on the southern side of the mainhull. Now both amas are on the same southern side of mainhull. How does the port ama end up on the opposite side than the other one still fixed to the boat?

If the tramp hold it together with the boat, wouldn't that have prevented the boat from capsizing?

Did the ama break loose as a result of capsize rather then being the cause of it? That would explain why the amas are on opposite sides of the main hull.

 

The amas start up in opposite sides of the main hull, and are linked to it no only by the cross-beams, but also by a lot of other stuff: net, rudder links and foils lines to get them up and down are just the more obvious. I find very normal that they are still on the corresponding sides even after the beams broke and the boat capsizes.

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Clean did a good job of documenting the implications on the Front Page.

(edit. ignore.)

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Joyon capsized once at the start of a North Atlantic record attempt, but he didn't have any problems with the boat that I remember. I know of no reason to blame the accident of Guo Chuan on the boat.

Coville did 2 round the world record attempts, each one in about 2 months, slower than Joyon but actually faster over real distance sailed. He bumped against things and almost capsized at the start of one of those. Material fatigue or wear over the years do seem quite plausible to me.

 

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22 minutes ago, semelis said:

I know of no reason to blame the accident of Guo Chuan on the boat.

+1

 

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Quote: "I know of no reason to blame the accident of Guo Chuan on the boat. " Semilis

 

Agreed - and yes, you're writing sensationalist BS there, Clean.

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Totally unfair and uncalled for from Clean, after all the achievements the Irens boats have achieved to say something like: "Maybe it is better to just let these cursed boats die?"

Not a good choice of words considering  Guo Chuan DID die not so long ago and  it had nothing to do with the boat. 

Team Actual was heading the wrong way around the world in an old boat into really nasty conditions. Plenty of raceboats, designed with minimal safety factor and on the bleeding edge of design - fail. Doesn't mean they are "cursed", the industry just learns and adapts. 

I am very happy nobody was hurt. 

G

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One thing Clean is right about is that these and almost all other big fast ocean racers are designed to go the right way - that is with the weather - not against.

Så when you take a 100ft tri and are banging into headwind at 50-70kn and 7m waves at Cap Horn - you are asking for trouble....

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1 hour ago, SeaGul said:

One thing Clean is right about is that these and almost all other big fast ocean racers are designed to go the right way - that is with the weather - not against.

Så when you take a 100ft tri and are banging into headwind at 50-70kn and 7m waves at Cap Horn - you are asking for trouble....

Indeed! It isn't cursed, it just wasn't designed for going the wrong way around the world after numerous years of hard slog. Maybe this west-about record will gain more allure now. 

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