• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sign in to follow this  
dogedog

Removing hard scale on gelcoat

Recommended Posts

Time to tackle the scale build up from hard lake water that’s around the A/C through hulls and gelcoat. Tried CLR and similar products w no change. Heard about vinegar -anything else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if it's even available anymore but we used to use Tang - the orange drink crystals - to clean the deposits out of our dishwasher in the Okanagan. Very hard water and it worked great - we'd just run it empty with the Tang in the soap dispenser about once a year.

I imagine any citric acid substance or cleaner would do the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Muriatic acid from a swimming pool supply store will clean this right up too. Note, add the acid to the water to dilute to the proper strength...not the other way around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes acid, but not Muriatic. Phosphoric acid or something sold for ceramic tile cleanup. Muriatic forms problematic chloride compounds that tend to be insoluble or very bad for metal fittings....especially bad for stainless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would vinegar work? I've used it on everything that gets crusted up around our house. I use it on the vehicles when the hose water dries leaving hard spots on the glass. Kind of reluctant to try it on the paint...

I've used Barkeepers Friend on the boat for stainless and stubborn stains on the deck. Haven't had to deal with any issues on the topsides yet. They do show it being used on Fiberglass Bathroom fixtures. Three kinds, Spray, cleanser and Soft Cleanser. Here is a link to their website: https://www.barkeepersfriend.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Works" Toilet Bowl Cleaner. Spray it off with water after wiping it on. Use gloves, eye protection etc. Dilute hydrochloric acid (aka muriatic acid) is main ingredient. About $1.78 at Home Depot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 brown or yellow waterline  stains are gone using this stuff fast. The works bowl cleaner not as good..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

White vinegar works for rust and some deposits depends we also use baking soda (kitchen calcium carbonate) +wetted hard brush+elbow grease and works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clorox Clean-Up works really well on grime, rust & scum lines - way better than diluted bleach so apparently there are some secret ingredients.

Just spritz it on and leave it. A real miracle product.

Full disclosure - I've never tried it on deposits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We go through gallons and gallons of muriatic. The lake is in a limestone valley in an old ocean bottom.

muriatic is diluted hydrochloride acid. 

We use fuzzy bowl cleaning wands that look like a bunny tail on a stick. Most any janitorial supply has them for a buck or two apiece

stand upwind .( it is really onvious if you are downwind as the fumes will cause an instant gag reflex.)

we pour some in a small bucket ( kiddie beach sand buckets work great) we hold the handle above the bunny tail at all times.

we try to catch the drops in the bucket ( this translates to both shoulders burning in just a few minutes and therefore giving an excuse to rest)

we gently and repeatedly "paint" the acid on the deposits and watch the deposits bubble away like magic. When the bubbling stops, you know the deposit is gone.

DO NOT LET THE ACID DRIP ON A GALVANIZED TRAILER... it makes nasty spots 

 

rinse , rinse rinse .... maybe even use some detergent to finish the rinsing. 

 

A couple minutes of contact with stsinjess steel doesnt do anything to the stainless. We acid wash lower pintles and gudgeons all the time. 

Bronze fittings turn pink on the surface.

Certainly there is a bit of damage to that bronze but  it is nothing compared to bumping that same surface with a sanding disc. 

 

Gloves?? Not just no but hell no!! You WILL get occasional bits of the mild Muriatic acid on your hands.

As you are not a total dumbass, you will immediately rinse it off and do no harm to your skin.

if you wear gloves, you WILL dribble some inside the cuffs and even siak your whole hand and,  an hour later, when you finally remove the gloves you will see your yellowed skin. It will heal in a couple days but if you hadn't had the gloves giving you a false sense of security you would have kept the acid off yourself. 

A good hose that is always ready and within reach is something only a damned fool idiot would be without. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this