Meat Wad

Grainger R42 - 12.8mts Performance Cruiser Trimaran

Recommended Posts

Hey Pil, with the small size of your jib, i'd be going furling with vertical battens as i have on TG. It's easy on the crew, fast put away and simple. You'd be hard pressed to ever have to reef your jib, surely its good upwind up to 30+ knots? Unlike monos, reef your main heaps first. We will sail TG with two reefs and full jib in 35 knots then i might put a few rolls in the jib furler but the shape is then crap (which my sailmaker is working on a possible solution) however it happens so in frequent it doesn't matter the boat still goes upwind like a steam train just not as high on the breeze. If it got real nasty i'd have to take the jib off the foil and go to a storm jib or a blade i have but never use. The nice thing about catamarans is we have plenty of deck space to do such sail changes in shit conditions. 

 

I'm not so sure about the solution on the R42 as when using the jib the staysail will be annoying when racing and tacking in short course racing which will be more often than not. Unless i'm not understanding that the staysail stay/sail is removable to allow jib to tack easily?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Indian Chief said:

Hey Pil, with the small size of your jib, i'd be going furling with vertical battens as i have on TG. It's easy on the crew, fast put away and simple. You'd be hard pressed to ever have to reef your jib, surely its good upwind up to 30+ knots? Unlike monos, reef your main heaps first. We will sail TG with two reefs and full jib in 35 knots then i might put a few rolls in the jib furler but the shape is then crap (which my sailmaker is working on a possible solution) however it happens so in frequent it doesn't matter the boat still goes upwind like a steam train just not as high on the breeze. If it got real nasty i'd have to take the jib off the foil and go to a storm jib or a blade i have but never use. The nice thing about catamarans is we have plenty of deck space to do such sail changes in shit conditions. 

 

I'm not so sure about the solution on the R42 as when using the jib the staysail will be annoying when racing and tacking in short course racing which will be more often than not. Unless i'm not understanding that the staysail stay/sail is removable to allow jib to tack easily?

Yep ... makes sense 

I was wondering about the R42 Staysail arrangement

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used to carry a conservative area full battened jib - which still had the boat powered up in 12  - 15 knots but there was too big a gap from the furling windward reacher so had a bigger, reefing, horizontal batten hank on sail made and for our purposes it woks like a charm.

I also really don't like self tacking jibs. For me it's about not being able to stop the boat. It's very easy to just throw the helm down, put the boats head through the wind without touching the sheets then dump the traveller and the boat just sits like a duck with the helm to lee.  

Mike McMullen in his excellent book on all things multihull recounts recovering his crew after he was swept off the fore deck of Three Cheers using this maneuver. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

I had a self tacking Jib on 66 (Cynaphobe) and not on XL2. I prefer the it be NOT be self tacking. I sail mainly in the ocean with swell and rely heavily on backing the jib to tack.
..

Yes on a cat that make sense - but most tris tack easy....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, boardhead said:

We used to carry a conservative area full battened jib - which still had the boat powered up in 12  - 15 knots but there was too big a gap from the furling windward reacher so had a bigger, reefing, horizontal batten hank on sail made and for our purposes it woks like a charm.

I also really don't like self tacking jibs. For me it's about not being able to stop the boat. It's very easy to just throw the helm down, put the boats head through the wind without touching the sheets then dump the traveller and the boat just sits like a duck with the helm to lee.  

Mike McMullen in his excellent book on all things multihull recounts recovering his crew after he was swept off the fore deck of Three Cheers using this maneuver. 

Did that on my IF long time ago - sailing alone - going to the crapper.....   But never tried with the trimaran - one could have a traveller arrangement on the self-tacking jib...    But the Back Marlin with the self tacking bigger jib - that a new one? One problem with a genua on the forestay is to sheet it properly in without getting problem with the shrouds - will no be a problem with that arrangement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Boys

6 hours ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

Yep ... makes sense 

I was wondering about the R42 Staysail arrangement

Hi Boys,

Since the boat is a racer and cruiser it will have to modes.

The Jib is way bigger than both of your boats have so will need to change down at some point in the wind range.

The Staysail is on a Facnor internal Halyard lock, it has its own stay in the luff, vertical battens and also a UV strip, so this sail can be lowered in race mode or kept hoisted in cruise mode for easy gear changes.

This halyard/lock/ base 3:1 arrangement then also accepts the furling Storm Jib, so you can switch these two sails out, the Jib must stay hoisted as it zips onto the forestay as it has an 8T Profurl Structural furler on the forestay.

The Jib also has vertical battens and a UV strip and will be likely used up to 20 knots true in race mode, maybe 25 knots but time will tell.

The Upwind Screecher will then be out in front of all that, no UV to be dropped when not in use just like you boys do.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So on my St Francis we have a vertical batten furling/reefing sail on a Facnor tape drive furler with the heavier, old school alloy foil over 1x19 st.st - which I don't trust - the shrouds, runners and checkstays are spectra. Obviously a barge compared to Skateaway but you still gotta try - right. The jib is not self tacking, I run two sheets each side with four strong points so the sail can be trimmed properly way inboard and out. The sail is actually oversized such that it is only fully deployed cracked off and gets rolled up a couple turns hard on the wind. The battens are long and the sail has a decent amount of roach. Playing with a production boat there are lots of constraints and compromises but perseverance pays off. What with recycling old battened headsails off Skateaway, sailmakers screw ups from other boats, the original genoa crap and the Mk1 and Mk2 vertical batten sails the current sail is the sixth in the "making a barge go fast" program. This last season we were very close, quicker at time, upwind in 25 apparent and chop than a well sailed and rigged Dragonfly 1000 - amazing what great sails and attention to detail can do!

The windward reacher on this boat is stretchy, 2.2 oz nylon then the jib takes over up to 50 knots. Having those vertical battens creates defined reef points where each batten at the forestay really helps out the concentrated leech loading, on this platform those loads are up there.

We have a storm jib on hanks for back up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Lowgroove said:

The Upwind Screecher will then be out in front of all that, no UV to be dropped when not in use just like you boys do.

Doyle has been working on a "cableless" style of code zero/screecher.  I am very interested in figuring seeing if this could help with my F31 upwind in light air. Did you look into that at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2019 at 2:51 AM, Vincent DePillis said:

Doyle has been working on a "cableless" style of code zero/screecher.  I am very interested in figuring seeing if this could help with my F31 upwind in light air. Did you look into that at all?

Hi Vincent,

Ill let Low Groove get his teeth into answering this however I will say that all of the big companies have their own versions of this system now.

The term "cableless" is a bit of a misnomer and the system has a by product of not being suitable for a large percentage of applications.

Ill let the full-time sailmaker take that further... I'm just the part time guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, newbiesporty said:

Hi Vincent,

IThe term "cableless" is a bit of a misnomer and the system has a by product of not being suitable for a large percentage of applications.

 

Do tell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2019 at 3:51 AM, Vincent DePillis said:

Doyle has been working on a "cableless" style of code zero/screecher.  I am very interested in figuring seeing if this could help with my F31 upwind in light air. Did you look into that at all?

The Doyle system does work well and I'm sure will get better.  Others are following.

Comanche swapped their North J1 (hank on) to a Doyle J1 cable less system and they are so far very happy with the way it works. Deploying and retrieval is easier, It folds to a smaller package making it easier to store and move but the real advantage is the weight saving and the speed at which the crew can change gears.... The 100's foredeck sails are big things for humans to lug around.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2019 at 5:15 PM, Lowgroove said:

Hi Boys

Hi Boys,

Since the boat is a racer and cruiser it will have to modes.

The Jib is way bigger than both of your boats have so will need to change down at some point in the wind range.

The Staysail is on a Facnor internal Halyard lock, it has its own stay in the luff, vertical battens and also a UV strip, so this sail can be lowered in race mode or kept hoisted in cruise mode for easy gear changes.

This halyard/lock/ base 3:1 arrangement then also accepts the furling Storm Jib, so you can switch these two sails out, the Jib must stay hoisted as it zips onto the forestay as it has an 8T Profurl Structural furler on the forestay.

The Jib also has vertical battens and a UV strip and will be likely used up to 20 knots true in race mode, maybe 25 knots but time will tell.

The Upwind Screecher will then be out in front of all that, no UV to be dropped when not in use just like you boys do.

Seems like a cool solution so long as the crews make the hard work changes setting up the staysail as the conditions change. I love my new Facnor internal lock on my screecher. TG is a different boat since the lock went in. Just don't feel that ugly load trying to break the boat now when the upwind screecher is up. We've had no issues with the lock at all. To the point now I'm thinking of putting one on the main next, but still wary of the SCENARIO of building breeze, offshore late at night and the lock won't let go because it hasn't been cleaned/serviced and ceases up....

Do you think that's a fair concern Lowgroove? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Indian Chief said:

Seems like a cool solution so long as the crews make the hard work changes setting up the staysail as the conditions change. I love my new Facnor internal lock on my screecher. TG is a different boat since the lock went in. Just don't feel that ugly load trying to break the boat now when the upwind screecher is up. We've had no issues with the lock at all. To the point now I'm thinking of putting one on the main next, but still wary of the SCENARIO of building breeze, offshore late at night and the lock won't let go because it hasn't been cleaned/serviced and ceases up....

Do you think that's a fair concern Lowgroove? 

I've been using mainsail locks for 20 years most weeks on the monos and can only remember having one problem....From wear on the lock release line through age ..... it hasn't happened again so I'm a fan of them..

 If I had the money everything would be on locks.... but locks aint locks....
you get what you pay for.. ours have all been Harken

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

I've been using mainsail locks for 20 years most weeks on the monos and can only remember having one problem....From wear on the lock release line through age ..... it hasn't happened again so I'm a fan of them..

 If I had the money everything would be on locks.... but locks aint locks....
you get what you pay for.. ours have all been Harken

 

Thanks for that, what mainsail locks do you use and recommend, the ones with trip line or the one that are self-releasing? Good jib and screecher locks are plentiful and I use Karver ones but mainsail ones are more difficult to find in my view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2019 at 2:51 AM, Vincent DePillis said:

Doyle has been working on a "cableless" style of code zero/screecher.  I am very interested in figuring seeing if this could help with my F31 upwind in light air. Did you look into that at all?

This is a very interesting development happening and all the majour brands have Multiple versions of this New/Old technology depending on the sails apparent wind sailing angle. There is loads of propaganda around and I am wary of saying too much here, what I will say is just my take, not a company policy or view and is quite possibly not correct or soon will be made inncorrect by the continual development happening.

The use of the word Cabless seems flat out wrong to me, so far even if they were originally test sailed with no cable all rhe sails I have seen have ended up with luff cables, all be it smaller, but still cables, being called by ither names. Holding a mast up by a sail only is an amazing feat but does not interest me much. Having to keep your expensive forestay still there in front of the sail taking some of the load and therefore allowing sag in a sail is also not something I am interested in (unless looking for more entry depth)and we are seeing this as a current solution being used for the J1 on the Big boat Pil mentioned I believe. combined tack load is therefore actually no less in this example for the J1, so what is the advantage for an upwind sail?

This technology is mainly seeing gains in the area between a Code Zero and a A3, when the mid girth over 75% is required, these sails struggle to get a smooth leech exit and meet the required girth (this is why non rated boats like Imoca or Volvo have had such great reaching sails designed without girth restrictions effecting the design) by putting more structure in the luff and load sharing with a much smaller cable the sails luff can project forward (no longer a taught straight line)allowing for the leech girth to come forward and allowing flatter and straighter exits that make very fast sails. There can be advantages in the luff entry shape also, alowing a finer entry and sailing closer to the wind can be the result essentially gaining a wider range of use than a traditiinal tight cable sail. All sounds great in theory and with a top pro crew on a boat like s Maxi 72, but the sails require more trimming and faster reactions and trim and helm, when the new "Cabless" luff then collapses on a sail sailing at between 50-80 degrees apparent it is going to probably flog like a bitch until fully sheeted back on to set the luff and it will feel like your rig is going to step off the side of the boat. Also bear in mind dropping down cable size is great news for a TP owner taking that stay from a 6k item to a 3k spend (even though he already owns the 6k cable from his previous sail)but in Multihull land where most boats use lower end Torque cables that cost 1-1.5k the new "baby" cable plus the extra cost in the new luff construction required to share the load makes this technology pretty expensive. It all sounds great and I will sell some of these sails but at this point they are getting sorted at the pro level sailing, more developments to come and I don't think they are for every application.

I do look forward to seeing what can be achieved with these sails in the coming years.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Indian Chief said:

Seems like a cool solution so long as the crews make the hard work changes setting up the staysail as the conditions change. I love my new Facnor internal lock on my screecher. TG is a different boat since the lock went in. Just don't feel that ugly load trying to break the boat now when the upwind screecher is up. We've had no issues with the lock at all. To the point now I'm thinking of putting one on the main next, but still wary of the SCENARIO of building breeze, offshore late at night and the lock won't let go because it hasn't been cleaned/serviced and ceases up....

Do you think that's a fair concern Lowgroove? 

Chief I am sure your rig is thanking you every time you hoist the sail.

The Main lock options are a bit harder, most have slots in the track and trip lines, I believe there is an Antal head car and track inserts that could work for your boat, but I remember a couple of boats in SA having ongoing issues with them.

Any riggers out there that can suggest the range of Main Halyard lock options? The reefs complicate it as needs to lock at different heights unlike all the front sails. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Lowgroove said:

Chief I am sure your rig is thanking you every time you hoist the sail.

The Main lock options are a bit harder, most have slots in the track and trip lines, I believe there is an Antal head car and track inserts that could work for your boat, but I remember a couple of boats in SA having ongoing issues with them.

Any riggers out there that can suggest the range of Main Halyard lock options? The reefs complicate it as needs to lock at different heights unlike all the front sails. 

On the TR36 I have hooks at deck level on the mast for all sails including the mainsail. The halyards are all fixed length. Reefs in main are handled by a mainsail halyard comprising fixed length sections, each with its own loop pertaining to a reef point and drop/hoist length. To reef the main I ease the downhaul/cunningham, unhook the mainsail halyard from its current hook and lower the halyard until I come across the next loop, hook on and then apply downhaul. My mainsail halyard has colour coded sections, each pertains to the colour of the associated reefline. Minimal faffing and easy to sort when tired..

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, gurok said:

On the TR36 I have hooks at deck level on the mast for all sails including the mainsail. The halyards are all fixed length. Reefs in main are handled by a mainsail halyard comprising fixed length sections, each with its own loop pertaining to a reef point and drop/hoist length. To reef the main I ease the downhaul/cunningham, unhook the mainsail halyard from its current hook and lower the halyard until I come across the next loop, hook on and then apply downhaul. My mainsail halyard has colour coded sections, each pertains to the colour of the associated reefline. Minimal faffing and easy to sort when tired..

 

 

Do you have a picture of this main halyard with loops in action?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, EarthBM said:

Do you have a picture of this main halyard with loops in action?

I shall walk to boat in morning and take some for you

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, nmanno said:

Thanks for that, what mainsail locks do you use and recommend, the ones with trip line or the one that are self-releasing? Good jib and screecher locks are plentiful and I use Karver ones but mainsail ones are more difficult to find in my view.

I only have experience with the Harken system.... 

13 hours ago, Lowgroove said:

 

The use of the word Cabless seems flat out wrong to me, so far even if they were originally test sailed with no cable all rhe sails I have seen have ended up with luff cables, all be it smaller, but still cables, being called by ither names. Holding a mast up by a sail only is an amazing feat but does not interest me much. Having to keep your expensive forestay still there in front of the sail taking some of the load and therefore allowing sag in a sail is also not something I am interested in (unless looking for more entry depth)and we are seeing this as a current solution being used for the J1 on the Big boat Pil mentioned I believe. combined tack load is therefore actually no less in this example for the J1, so what is the advantage for an upwind sail?

.

 

Advantage on a multi up to 50ft is not much... The advantage for cable less upwind sails on the bigger boats like Comanche is huge. Weight saving is one.. the other is the ability to get it up and down much quicker with 6 less guys on the fore deck. This used to be hanked on so imagine the drop when the breeze kicks and having to bag this sucker on the leeward rail then get it back to the cockpit... now two guys hook it on and control the roll for the hoist and then retrieve it when done... also meaning the time it takes to change down and up a gear is way less... plus It is stored in a shorter bag.  It is very cool........ WIN WIN

https://yachtracing.life/doyle-sails-cableless-headsails-deliver-results/

13 hours ago, Lowgroove said:

 

 The reefs complicate it as needs to lock at different heights unlike all the front sails. 

Yes you get used to it....The trip line just needs to be held down / open while the lock goes through all reef points when dropping at the end of the day... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, gurok said:

I shall walk to boat in morning and take some for you

 

 

IMG-1502.thumb.jpeg.f0b4a3d50ffd7f4c308fceb6bbcc8c43.jpeg

Generally unpleasant this morning with rain and wind so no sail hoist but I took enough pictures for you to get the gist of the system

Mast hooks. All the load taken by bar that runs horizontally through mast. Carbon tabs just there to stop things slipping off.

IMG-1503.thumb.jpeg.ed9330eee6c2b1ed1ed432354f0411cb.jpegIMG-1505.thumb.jpeg.70c97cdcbd7f0ca9cfcb07742a6a5cf0.jpeg

2:1 mainsail halyard in sections linked with spliced loops. Each section length equates to reef drop

IMG-1504.thumb.jpeg.f11364ed6824c900d44884eaf0cfcfb8.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The halyard can be run through a clutch, then past a cleat, round a turning block back to the winch.

Hoist to desired position, clutch (they don’t hold shit and are not even very strong but can secure the unloaded halyard), take the line off the winch and make it down on the cleat, release the clutch and apply downhaul.

The cleat is gentle on your expensive, high tech, halyard. It is secure. It can be eased under load without any damage to the line and re-secured at any increment. Way more convenient to use. That single stud anchor on the spliced loop is questionable.The line can be set at any length, those fixed length cables will be tough to size spot on.

Are we still talking about this Grainger?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

compare with my Seacart 30. "Buzz" . we are 1100Kg in offshore race trim... and so far Morpheus and Freshly Squeezed have yet to really worry us : yes up wind in a sea way length beats us... off wind we have it.

But then Buzz's crew are certifiable insane :-)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The boat has been painted red ? It is another one ?

Looks nice anyway !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SSolo said:

compare with my Seacart 30. "Buzz" . we are 1100Kg in offshore race trim... and so far Morpheus and Freshly Squeezed have yet to really worry us : yes up wind in a sea way length beats us... off wind we have it.

But then Buzz's crew are certifiable insane :-)

So far every time I have gone sailing I have managed to worry myself and  so far I've yet to go sailing without breaking something /someone.

"But then Buzz's crew are certifiable insane :-)" and a lot less comfortable.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, SSolo said:

compare with my Seacart 30. "Buzz" . we are 1100Kg in offshore race trim... and so far Morpheus and Freshly Squeezed have yet to really worry us : yes up wind in a sea way length beats us... off wind we have it.

But then Buzz's crew are certifiable insane :-)

SeaCart 30 is really a legendary boat - that need some crazyness - and as the US use to say to other nations be polite (be fore Trump); "they punch way over their weight-class".... 

SeaCart is so well buildt and designed - that they can be sailed to max all the time - other boats need a couple of years to sort out before they get up to potential... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you tell us more about the downwind sail plan Lowgroove and the rationale around the choices you’ve made there? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/16/2019 at 5:48 PM, gurok said:

 

2:1 mainsail halyard in sections linked with spliced loops. Each section length equates to reef drop

IMG-1504.thumb.jpeg.f11364ed6824c900d44884eaf0cfcfb8.jpeg

This is so simple and genius! I love the simplicity. Whilst it won't reduce the compression load, I tend to like this KISS approach. So to be clear, on the picture above, you have the 2.1 mainsheet and 2 loops, The main halyard is composed of many such sections and so when you take a reef, you just go to the next loop and put that on the mast "hooks" and re-attach the cunningham and that's it? 

What are all the other mast hooks one can see on your pictures? Is that for the foresails?

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, nmanno said:

This is so simple and genius! I love the simplicity. Whilst it won't reduce the compression load, I tend to like this KISS approach. So to be clear, on the picture above, you have the 2.1 mainsheet and 2 loops, The main halyard is composed of many such sections and so when you take a reef, you just go to the next loop and put that on the mast "hooks" and re-attach the cunningham and that's it? 

What are all the other mast hooks one can see on your pictures? Is that for the foresails?

In answer to your questions.

Yes the main halyard has many such sections and yes I just drop to the next loop, apply downhaul and I'm done. No clutches, no guessing, nothing falling off of reef horns while I tighten stuff up.

Yes the other hooks are for foresails and kites. 

Rob Meizer of Barracouta sails was the "genius" behind it all on Freshly Squeezed 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy crap well I don't really care if that Grainger can even sail well or fast but DAMN it looks FANTASTIC just sitting still!

If I had $26 in my bank account I would definitely buy one of these bad boys, just based on looks alone :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Floating Duck said:

Holy crap well I don't really care if that Grainger can even sail well or fast but DAMN it looks FANTASTIC just sitting still!

If I had $26 in my bank account I would definitely buy one of these bad boys, just based on looks alone :lol:

+1

But $26 will not make it. Any idea about the price?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well Tony has left the building.....no photo of Boat testing while he was here

      so here is  a  G36  sailing....in light airs

45434378_1751904874918406_9032549186809102336_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonys Newsletter has just been posted....no pics sailing yet, just in marina

  

VENOM TAKES TO THE WATER

R42 Trimaran Venom was launched on the Gold Coast in mid October and spent several days undergoing sea trials out of Southport Yacht Club. Venom was impressive in initial trials and is currently preparing to head south to Adelaide where where she will be based. The photos were taken during sailing preparation at Southport Yacht Club.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10/29 and 10/30, you posted the video descriptions... that was nice, and I appreciated it, so that I could evaluate whether I wanted to go over to ZuckerBook to view the corresponding video.

I'll go upvote those...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, huey 2 said:

Looks like it will meet the design prediction of flying the main hull in 12 knots of wind.

Another gem by Grainger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can we see some footage shot from the weather ama scoping bow to stern in a decent chop, at speed, to windward and see how much or little she pitches. Maybe at 27 apparent doing 14.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/7/2019 at 5:44 AM, samc99us said:

The rig does a look a little small. For reference, a local Corsair 43 was refit early in life with an 80' rotating carbon rig for better performance in light air. The Corsair 37RS has a 51' rig. In both cases the boats are a good bit heavier than the Grainger, and often sailing in areas with less breeze than Venom. Still, it would appear the floats can support a slightly larger rig, potentially with rig canting an option for race mode :)

Nearly 2:1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, basildog said:

Re; Cost,

I've heard from a very reliable source (close mate of T.G.) that $2.5 million is the money.

 

Is that AUS money or US? Could that be correct? - seems very stiff even AUS $....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might explain why not too many 40 odd foot carbon trimarans are being built any more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Venom in Cronulla,  she is on her way to her home in SA.....there was the SE change that was coming up the coast and was offered a spot .   You can see the bushfire smoke in the sky.... and the change caused the fires to change direction and flare up....a scary fire season , never seen conditions exacerbated by the worst drought inland,..and on the east coast of oz . The IOD the indian ocean dipole is showing the huge body of hot water  that is changing the monsoon season in se asia , which then translates to no rain laden wind system from the nw of oz....it will be a long and difficult summer

74615479_558622878229383_7114803747494035456_n-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Venom just rocked up in Eden.

Looking lovely. 

I take it there is a third central rudder as no float blades fitted or evident on deck??

IMG_20191120_102956.jpg.afd98976d261c5529dea38e25e843ad7.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#VenomSailing reports on arrival at home port: Set off for Adelaide fro Potrland and had a mild first part of the delivery - just had to avoid the hundreds of unlit craypot buoys and their trailing lines all along the Limestone coast.
(Tip - most seem to be around 35m depth contours and none in water > 50m).
Hit by a stronger than expected westerly change at 0430 when not far north of Robe.
Was wet and wild in the squals but the boat handled it beautifully - solid and stable as a rock. 20knots seemed a bit much for a delivery so we slowed things down a bit.
Fantastic welcome on the dock from MYASA members - it was a great greeting and really apprecitefd."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now