GauchoGreg

Banque Populaire IX

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5 hours ago, audiopixie said:

not just french. we have a german guy at work and we were pondering the other day whose job it is to decide gender on new words entering the language. and who gendered all the words that came before. as a native english speaker it seems odd that table, car, etc need a gender 

Getting way into serious thread drift now - but with all the post-modern, neo-marxist idiologues about, who promote socially constructed gender identity politics, over the male/female reality, I shudder to think where this language thing could all end up. :D

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3 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Getting way into serious thread drift now - but with all the post-modern, neo-marxist idiologues about, who promote socially constructed gender identity politics, over the male/female reality, I shudder to think where this language thing could all end up. :D

sometimes the drifts are better than the threads though :D

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And BPIX is the wrong way up.

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Ouch. Checking for more info . . . 

Quote

we’re bound to see a lot more of what we saw early this morning: one of the world’s fastest sailboats – upside down, with the skipper and crew hanging out inside waiting for their shore teams and a tow.

Head over here to check out a 360 degree video of the Maxi Banque Pop, and here’s more from their media team:

-Crew (Armel Le Cleach, boat captain Pierre-Emmanuel Herisse, and cameraman Fulvio d’Aguanno) are safe and uninjured inside the boat.

-Capsize occurred around 3 AM off of Morocco,

-Crew quickly triggered EPIRB, support and salvage plans were activated immediately and support operations are in progress.

-Trimaran was headed to Nice to compete in the Nice UltiMed event

-Weather data does not show anything extreme.  Team is awaiting Armel’s explanation for the incident.

-Too early to say if Maxi BP will be able to make the Route du Rhum now.

http://sailinganarchy.com/2018/04/14/over-the-top/

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Well, after Actual this is the second fuck up in 5 months. Looks like they are beyond the limits. Hopefully no one is gonna die.

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Looks like that despite the risks of leading edge development, the safety plans worked, for Actual too. No one paid the ultimate price this time either.

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Glad to see everyone is safe while they wait off the coast of Morocco in the Med for rescue.

And to think some people suggested that the VOR 'goes Multi'.

Could you imagine this anywhere within 1,000 miles of Point Nemo?

No thank you.

Just sayin

'SS

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Update, machine trans

Quote

Update - 4.30 pm 

Following the capsizing of the Maxi Banque Populaire IX last night, the crew was evacuated early in the afternoon by helicopter hoist by the Moroccan army. Armel Le Cléac'h, Pierre Emmanuel Hérissé and the cameraman arrived in Casablanca where they were taken care of by the C onsul at de France. More information in the coming hours with the first words of Armel. 

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/news/le-maxi-banque-populaire-ix-chavire-cette-nuit-au-large-du-maroc-lequipage-est-en-securite

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Conditions weren't extreme, may be they broke something like Cammas in 2008.

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FIRST WORDS ARMEL LE CLÉAC'H FOLLOWING THE CAPSIZING OF THE MAXI BANQUE POPULAIRE IX

[UPDATED AT 16:30] - THE MAXI BANQUE POPULAIRE IX CAPSIZED LAST NIGHT OFF MOROCCO, THE CREW IS SAFE

SOUTH OF THE BORDER FOR MAXI BANQUE POPULAIRE IX 

April 14, 2018

Following the capsizing of the Maxi Banque Populaire IX last night off the coast of Morocco, the crew was airlifted by the Moroccan army. Armel Le Cléac'h, Pierre Emmanuel Hérissé and cameraman arrived in Casablanca where they were supported by the Consulate of France. Armel, joined by his shore team in the late afternoon, tells his capsize:

The place of the capsize 

"  That night we sailed port tack towards Cadiz. We left Lorient since Tuesday, we had a big edge along Portugal. For practice, we went for a crossing point in the north west of the Canaries. It was our return to Cadiz in order to fetch the crew for the rest of the program.

The conditions of sea and wind were quite okay, we had 18/20 knots of wind at the time of the incident.

Armel Le Cléac'h

The sea was a bit formed because the wind had been supported for quite some time on the west Portugal. Going down to the Canaries, we had strong winds up to 40-45 knots. We were on a pretty tight edge of nearly unbridled, one reef in the mainsail and jib. I had the routes and the hours the wind should ease off. The conditions were quite stable, I checked and there was no grain possible or storm ahead. Pierre-Emmanuel Hérissé (Technical Director of Team Banque Populaire) and our media-man were inside, I was in my cabin in standby maneuvers. 

I was lying to me five minutes on the bunk to begin a nap. The ship began to rise quickly following a oversold wind, I have not had time to get out. I could shock the mainsail but it was not enough. Everything happened very quickly, the boat rolled over on starboard . I ended up upside down in the water that had flooded the cabin. Pierre-Emmanuel called me to see if I was there. We arrived at an understanding between two waves, I managed to get out of there and I hoist in the central hull safe with them, away. 

We immediately made a point to make sure nobody gets hurt. I very quickly started the beacon distress to alert authorities. 

We met the safety equipment and we put on our survival suits. I contacted Ronan Lucas (Director of Team Banque Populaire) by Iridium laptop that was in the can to survive to tell him that we were all on board and especially that n 'there were no injuries. 

Two hours later, a freighter arrived in the area, we exchanged with them by VHF . It was dark, we could not leave the ship immediately. 

The day dawned, a patrol was to join us later in the day but eventually a helicopter from the Navy could take off in Casablanca this afternoon to pick us up. Upon arrival, one after the other, we got into the helicopter and we landed at the military port of Casablanca on a dockside frigate. We were very welcomed by the Royal Moroccan Navy, we could eat and do some health checks, we thank them for all and the crew of the helicopter. We were then supported by the Consulate of France. " 

State of mind

It's really hard to live, sea conditions were manageable, we've cruised before in much stronger and engaged conditions. Everything changed in seconds. I think it's related to a wind oversold. By the time we left the boat, three shells and arms were intact, the mast meanwhile, is broken into several pieces. " 

A race against time is now engaged to recover the boat as soon as possible and make every effort to be the start of the Route du Rhum in November.

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/news/premiers-mots-darmel-le-cleach-suite-au-chavirage-du-maxi-banque-populaire-ix

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^ Crew all OK. Hulls and beams intact, but rig wrecked. 

Translation says, " It's related to a wind oversold". Could that mean "wind gusts"?

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Yep it was a gust. Armel didn't have time to ease the sheets...

I'm really surprised they still don't have automatic mainsheet breakers....

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I am pretty sure that the boat uses the 'Upside Up' system for sheet release. He mentions "I could shock the mainsail but it was not enough."  The Upside Up system uses an electrical relay to dump the main (and other sails) nearly instantly and can have 'ripcord' triggers in multiple locations and there would for sure be one at his 'pilotberth'. 

image.thumb.png.d909f26bb541db3a3127441d5a0adc2f.png

 

So this is what I base my supposition of the meaning of 'shock the mainsail' by hitting the panic button to the Harken ElectroCam.  I think that there are also provisions in that system that could trigger the main release automatically from sensors that measure boat heel, mast compression or capshroud tension. Go to their site and you will see that they have pretty much everything that could be instrumented and controlled in their bag of tricks. New goodies there since I checked the site just last week. I'm contemplating using one of their mast ball load cells on a daycharter cat design that I'm finalizing the rig details for.

image.thumb.png.ae25947911a1c53b1e7488b8d610d5a2.png

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

I am pretty sure that the boat uses the 'Upside Up' system for sheet release.

If that's the case, the credibility of that system is gone, eh?  For racing multihulls, capsize is still a routine fact of life.

Race Committee letter to Dick Newick, October, 1967: Royal Western Yacht Club of England  (fifty years ago!)

Quote

"I notice that you are taking steps to enable the crew to right the vessel when it has capsized, but my committee are more interested in any steps you may take to stop the capsizing in the first place. We are still of the opinion that to race along at 25 knots in between periodically capsizing is not a proper way to cross the Atlantic..."

 

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6 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

^ Crew all OK. Hulls and beams intact, but rig wrecked. 

Translation says, " It's related to a wind oversold". Could that mean "wind gusts"?

In French, a sudden wind gust is called a "survente", which if you consider it as "sur-vente" can be translated word for word by over-sold...

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Just now, Laurent said:

In French, a sudden wind gust is called a "survente", which if you consider it as "sur-vente" can be translated word for word by over-sold...

Many thanks, Laurent.

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Can't help thinking a decent hunk of lead on a keel isn't such a bad way to traverse the world's oceans, albeit quite a bit slower than on an Ultime (when it's not on its lid, that is). ;)

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As always, thanks for translation and updating service to all above.

Big setback for the team, but it seems that all are safe, which is the main thing.

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So the guy is solo sailing with a techy observing and also a media guy? Why? For training? How did that work out for you? 

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58 minutes ago, eastern motors said:

They had 1 reef in main + jib in 40--45knots wind.  No one on deck. Seems aggressive for a delivery.

Read again, the 40-45 was earlier in the trip, the capsize happened in 15-20.

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On 2/3/2018 at 9:34 PM, Boudreaux said:

These boats are pretty amazing.  Could anyone hazard a guess of what expense goes into a program like this?  Engineering, fabrication, tuning _ campaign _ upgrades?  Seems like an insane budget.  I'm thinking this is a $14mil build, then pay to maintain and upgrade.  Anybody have a good handle on this?

a sickening sum for what amounts to a hollow game, even if the toy is mind blowing.

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16 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

I am pretty sure that the boat uses the 'Upside Up' system for sheet release. He mentions "I could shock the mainsail but it was not enough."  The Upside Up system uses an electrical relay to dump the main (and other sails) nearly instantly and can have 'ripcord' triggers in multiple locations and there would for sure be one at his 'pilotberth'.  [...]

Was Upside Up even on?
Did they use the second clam cleat trick to limit runout and ease recovery? (Sail -> electric cam -> standard cam/cleat/whatever. The electric cam releases a predetermined length of sheet, not everything. Good in case of false activation and normal problems. The singlehander does not have to put everything back together. Maybe not so great in SHTF situations.)

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Towing operation underway: Banque Populaire trimaran is presently being towed to Casablanca.

Posted Yesterday:
http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/news/le-maxi-banque-populaire-ix-est-en-cours-de-remorquage-vers-casablanca


MACHINE TRANSLATION

Members of the team Banque Populaire crew, embarked last night aboard a tug, arrived on the capsize area in the morning today. After several hours of operations and recovery of damaged equipment, the tug began the repatriation of the trimaran to Casablanca.

The location of the Maxi Banque Populaire IX Having been facilitated by a Moroccan army boat which patrol and ensured the safety of the area of the accident since yesterday, the technical team of the People's Bank team was able to quickly join The premises in the morning to begin the operations necessary for towing.

Arriving on the capsize area in the morning, 2 professional divers and 3 members of the team Banque Populaire technical team accessed the boat to recover a maximum of items that could damage the trimaran more significantly during Towing. For example, we recovered pieces of mast that were trapped under the boat. The conditions on the area were good today which allowed us to work well.

The towing could start then but it will take time. The crew and members of the Team present try to preserve the trimaran to Casablanca. Wind conditions are relatively good and manageable, but we are extremely cautious.

Everyone put themselves in order of walking very quickly to be as effective as possible and implement the rescue of the crew and the towing of the boat. In Casablanca or here in Lorient, everyone has been dedicated to this since yesterday. We greatly appreciated the solidarity and the help of the French and Moroccan interlocutors with whom we have worked so far, we thank them warmly. »

Reminder of the facts following the capsize of the Maxi Banque Populaire IX in the night of Friday to Saturday off the coast of Morocco, the crew consisting of the Armel Le Cléac'h, Pierre-Emmanuel bristling, technical director of the Team Banque Populaire and a cameraman, was hoisted By the Moroccan Army. The three men arrived in Casablanca in the day of Saturday when they were taken care of by the consulate of France.

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On 14/04/2018 at 8:09 PM, southerncross said:

 The ship began to rise quickly following a windgust, I have not had time to get out. I could shock the mainsail but it was not enough. 

I wouldn't be surprised if Armel regrets not having taken the configuration used on Macif with the cabane/bunk right behind the winches and lines :

DN8V3zTWAAEawAe.jpg:large

instead of as on banque pop: in front of them.

However he could release the mainsail sheet from inside ? (I guess it's the case).

 

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I'm just surprised people here aren't saying what Armel, the winner of the last VG, should have done differently or what kind of mast/sail configuration would have prevented this capsize.  We should be chest deep in couch wisdom by now.  But seriously, these Ultim's have to be safer than the ORMA 60s were based on their capsize/pitchpole rates.  I remember during the 2005 TJV Armel was co-skipper on the ORMA Foncia when it went wrong side up.  He was supposed to take over that program after the race as skipper and politely declined after that abrupt experience.

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1 hour ago, r.finn said:

We should be chest deep in couch wisdom by now.

LOL!  Mostly a French concern here.  Don't get many of those types.

Anyway, nothing like a good capsize to get the wheels spinning in the design team's noggins.

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13 hours ago, r.finn said:

I'm just surprised people here aren't saying what Armel, the winner of the last VG, should have done differently or what kind of mast/sail configuration would have prevented this capsize.  We should be chest deep in couch wisdom by now.  But seriously, these Ultim's have to be safer than the ORMA 60s were based on their capsize/pitchpole rates.  I remember during the 2005 TJV Armel was co-skipper on the ORMA Foncia when it went wrong side up.  He was supposed to take over that program after the race as skipper and politely declined after that abrupt experience.

I hope so - the ORMA's were a bit on the beastly side to sail in terms of stability in a solid sea state

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14 hours ago, yl75 said:

I wouldn't be surprised if Armel regrets not having taken the configuration used on Macif with the cabane/bunk right behind the winches and lines :

DN8V3zTWAAEawAe.jpg:large

instead of as on banque pop: in front of them.

However he could release the mainsail sheet from inside ? (I guess it's the case).

 

I would have thought given the outcome this should be mandatory given the potential for damage or is it a case of Sponsor pays we can rebuild her? LOL 

Some people see this as French madness already. At what factor does the madness increase from sailing an Imoca 60 like Hugo Boss to these foiling multihull monsters?

 

 

 

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Until you've experienced life on the edge...you just can't understand. It is addictive. 

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Considering how many of these larger tris have raced around the world, solo and fully crewed, there’s nothing mad about it, I think the key is keeping the potential power under control.

These are the coolest racing machines on the water.....

Hope they get her refit and racing asap. 

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When those oceanic speedsters sail inshore , the wave pattern is different and dangerous.  

Short wave period and wave refraction from the coast, current or shelf water. 

The week the accident happened had two very aggressive westerly gales. 

In the western approaches i was sailing downwind, in very uncomfortable triangular ,short period waves. The bow plugged  into the back of a three meter wave , with another three meter wave coming in under the transom quarter 

I can see how a fast tri , spanning two wave trains, could trip on one of these waves , even thought the wave height is only moderate and the boat is being operated at moderate power.

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50 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

When those oceanic speedsters sail inshore , the wave pattern is different and dangerous.  

Short wave period and wave refraction from the coast, current or shelf water. 

The week the accident happened had two very aggressive westerly gales. 

In the western approaches i was sailing downwind, in very uncomfortable triangular ,short period waves. The bow plugged  into the back of a three meter wave , with another three meter wave coming in under the transom quarter 

I can see how a fast tri , spanning two wave trains, could trip on one of these waves , even thought the wave height is only moderate and the boat is being operated at moderate power.

Armel said that he got surprised by a wind gust. From what he said, it is more a matter of not being able to depower quick enough from the bunk.

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

Armel said that he got surprised by a wind gust. From what he said, it is more a matter of not being able to depower quick enough from the bunk.

Similar to this.

 

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51 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Similar to this.

 

Its entirley possible...he is a pro and knows well how to describe the situation.

my opinion is that inshore, coastal sea state is challenging

be alert when the forecast calls for a big breeze as you make a lee shore  landfall or sail inside the 100 meter depth contour  

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On 10/31/2017 at 4:17 PM, yl75 said:

No it is Martin Fischer, by the way on below pic :

37988083186_62f9fde596_b.jpg

Quite impressive how the profile has this concave shape at the back of the foil

Might be for super criticality, to align flows off of the trailing edge.

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3 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Its entirley possible...he is a pro and knows well how to describe the situation.

my opinion is that inshore, coastal sea state is challenging

be alert when the forecast calls for a big breeze as you make a lee shore  landfall or sail inside the 100 meter depth contour  

That's right Zit on a Slug - you tell him that amateur Armel how to deal with the coastal waters

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4 hours ago, southerncross said:

Similar to this.

 

Except that Virbac's capsize was mostly due to too little line/valve diameter on the main sheet hyd cylinder causing the main dump to be slow (too slow to respond to the gust) to keep up with the tightning of the sheet that happens when dumping the traveler while the rig is canted to windward

 

Result obviously similar

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4 hours ago, southerncross said:

Similar to this.

 

Yes!

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2 minutes ago, Christian said:

Result obviously similar

Emphasis on the word similar.  There was a gust.  Couldn't dump the main in time.  Capsize.  Similar.

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2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Emphasis on the word similar.  There was a gust.  Couldn't dump the main in time.  Capsize.  Similar.

ANTI CAPSIZE DEVICE

Image result for hatchet

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Just now, Rasputin22 said:

ANTI CAPSIZE DEVICE

LOL. There was a day when one was close by.

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From Ronan Lucas, boat captain.

"This morning we put the boat back the right side up with a crane. It is now time to assess the damage. We found out that the deck of the main hull, around the mast step is damaged in many places. It is also true for the deck of the floats, and the fairings of the beams. Part of the cockpit "protection roof" is gone too.

We already are looking at the different options to organize the repairs, get a mast and a boom on time. The goal is to get the boat back in the water before the end of the summer so Armel can train in the right conditions to be ready on the start line for the Route du Rhum in Sain-Malo."

 
I would say that the tone is cautiously optimistic...

 

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3 hours ago, Laurent said:

get a mast and a boom on time

That was a costly flip.

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4 hours ago, southerncross said:

That was a costly flip.

And that's only the obvious stuff, Sox. I imagine the wiring looms and switchgear could be seriously damaged also, no?

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18 hours ago, slug zitski said:

When those oceanic speedsters sail inshore , the wave pattern is different and dangerous.  

Short wave period and wave refraction from the coast, current or shelf water. 

The week the accident happened had two very aggressive westerly gales. 

In the western approaches i was sailing downwind, in very uncomfortable triangular ,short period waves. The bow plugged  into the back of a three meter wave , with another three meter wave coming in under the transom quarter 

I can see how a fast tri , spanning two wave trains, could trip on one of these waves , even thought the wave height is only moderate and the boat is being operated at moderate power.

Interesting... Good to get a report from someone who was in the area.

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18 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

ANTI CAPSIZE DEVICE

Image result for hatchet

Just prior to the 1976 OSTAR, I read that skipper Mike Kane kept a very sharp hatchet in the cockpit of his Spirit of America for just such an emergency.

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I used to sail with Mike on Crusader and he later was a partner in Lean Machine for a short time. Mike was one crazy dude. I haven't seen Mike since the last time NOSA held the N2E trophies at the Bahia.

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22 hours ago, Laurent said:

From Ronan Lucas, boat captain.

"This morning we put the boat back the right side up with a crane. It is now time to assess the damage. We found out that the deck of the main hull, around the mast step is damaged in many places. It is also true for the deck of the floats, and the fairings of the beams. Part of the cockpit "protection roof" is gone too.

We already are looking at the different options to organize the repairs, get a mast and a boom on time. The goal is to get the boat back in the water before the end of the summer so Armel can train in the right conditions to be ready on the start line for the Route du Rhum in Sain-Malo."

 
I would say that the tone is cautiously optimistic...

 

Considering who the sponsor is and how deep their pockets are, I'm guessing they're fairly optimistic she'll be ready to do RdR.

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He doesn't say if the boat was fully foiling at the time

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Some news from Tip and Shaft's efforts to get more info, including some worries by the organizer of the RdR.

Quote

What consequences for the Ultim 32/23 class? It was so far one of the major assets of the Ultimes: their safety . Only Francis Joyon had capsized nearly seven years ago , at the start of a record attempt in the North Atlantic on his Irens plan. " The capsizing of Banque Pop is a game- changer ," says Hervé Favre of OC Sport, organizer of the Route du Rhum, among others, " The safety of the Ultimate was an argument - with the organizers of the Volvo Ocean Race, for example, or This will also complicate the discussions with the MRCCs from Australia or New Zealand for the world tours. "In a rival team, we say" shocked by what happened to Banque Pop in 18 knots of wind : we'll have to be smart and responsible with the class, it's not allowed to happen to us . " 
In four months, the Ultim 32/23 class, just created, laments two losses on its four members : if they are provisional, they emphasize however the fragility of a still very small fleet and the difficulties to guarantee a minimum plateau. The example of Nice UltiMed, which is left with a starting line reduced to ... three boats, worries the event organizers. According to our information, the conduct of the race was, for a time, questioned , the minimum of four trimarans in the port not being reached - a commitment that had already led the class owners to co-finance the rental of the trimaran Grand Large Emotion in the colors of Actual. Hence the presence, despite his lump, announced by press release , Armel Le Cléac'h in Nice, where he will give April 30 its first press conference. Asked several times, Jean-Baptiste Durier, director of Nice UltiMed, did not wish to answer our questions, evoking " an overloaded schedule ". For his part, Emmanuel Bachellerie, general delegate of the class, wishes to recall: " We must not forget that we are a nascent class and a demanding class , in every respect: in terms of construction, balance, from the economic point of view ... When François Gabart returns to Brest, we marvel rightly from his perf, but it remains nonetheless that to survey 850 miles in 24 hours as he did during his world tour, you have to be in precarious balance, it happens most of the time, with rare exceptions, it does not pass. "

gtrans http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=auto&langpair=auto|en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fus12.campaign-archive.com%2F%3Fu%3D1e692787e2c4cc3370813fca1%26id%3Db7674be3e7%26e%3D3854e9c80a

original version https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-109-yvon-breton-cyclisme-et-voile-trs-complmentaires-le-mercato-des-designers-de-lac36-482585?e=3854e9c80a

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They seem to be a bit obsessed with the nitty gritty on Tip & Shaft though. They raise the question "why wasn't anyone on watch when Armel took a nap?" well, he was getting more training time. Thats why. 

Its all very knee jerk and demanding answers that apparently don't really exist yet, or are potentially being investigated and really aren't anyone's business yet.

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True he was getting more training, but with 20/20 hindsight in our favor it may have been worthwhile to have someone ready at the "oh fuck" button while Armel was sleeping. 

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10 hours ago, Gorn FRANTIC!! said:

True he was getting more training, but with 20/20 hindsight in our favor it may have been worthwhile to have someone ready at the "oh fuck" button while Armel was sleeping. 

Well we now know what happens if the system fails on that boat and he has to manually trigger things on BPIX. They'll be figuring out an easier/better way now.

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23 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

That is sort of like closing the barn door after the cows are gone...

Clearly these projects are on very tight schedules, but on this one they could have waited a bit

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So the automatic emergency oh fuck systems were not activ ...

Gotta be a hell of a "no money for you" from the insurance !

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11 hours ago, popo said:

So the automatic emergency oh fuck systems were not activ ...

Gotta be a hell of a "no money for you" from the insurance !

I'm 99% sure that the boat is NOT insured.  If it were; it would be enormously expensive.  If (and it's very unlikely) the boat is insured it would make no difference if the auto release system was implemented yet - unless of course you think that the insurance company has listed the auto release system as mandatory - and what do you think the chances are of that?

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The boat IS insurred it's said in the tip'n shaft article

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17 hours ago, popo said:

The boat IS insurred it's said in the tip'n shaft article

Self insured.

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On 21/04/2018 at 5:11 AM, yl75 said:

On Ocean data system site, they are saying the installation of the UpSideUp system was not finished, the release mechanism parts were not installed yet :

http://www.oceandatasystem.com/actualites

The news has disappeared from the site ...

(too bad I didn't take a screen grab, should have known better especially with these non complete Urls ..)

 

Edit : Still available through Google cache !  :

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:33RtKhlac6gJ:www.oceandatasystem.com/actualites+&cd=1&hl=fr&ct=clnk&gl=fr

 

sans-titre.jpeg

Also a cache version of the English version, but too old :

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:QgmIp167ht8J:www.oceandatasystem.com/actualites/en+&cd=1&hl=fr&ct=clnk&gl=fr&lr=lang_en

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3 hours ago, southerncross said:

 

On that video we can see that the foils/trimmers of the central rudder have disappeared, when did that happened ? (as I don't see how they could have been hit during the cap size)

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So the boat was insured but not the mast and boom and sails ...

It means that only the transport and the salvation operations are covered.

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1 hour ago, popo said:

So the boat was insured but not the mast and boom and sails ...

It means that only the transport and the salvation operations are covered.

That's from the last tip and shaft news right ?

http://www.tipandshaft.com/ultime/banque-populaire-un-chavirage-et-des-questions/

Interesting that in this news they report Armel saying that the UpSideUp system was installed for the mainsail, not finished for the foresails, and that it did work but too late.

(not in line with the removed Ocean data system news ...)

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Interviews form Armel :

https://www.ouest-france.fr/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-armel-le-cleac-h-99-99-de-chance-d-etre-au-depart-5717368

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/armel-le-cleac-h-pas-du-tout-traumatise-par-le-chavirage-23-04-2018-11936974.php

 

He says he think they can make it for the Route du Rhum in Nov 2018, the critical part on the schedule being making a new mast : at least 4 months, and the boat yards/providers are quite busy with Imocas and other ultims. (also 1.5 million euros)

Also that he released the main sheet manually from his bunk (an hydraulic command), but that the upsideup systems were not fully installed.

They also got the computer back, so should be able to analyze what exactly happened,  only wind gust, or issue with the wind instuments, or autopilot.

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END OF THE FIRST STAGE OF THE MAXI BANQUE POPULAIRE IX PROJECT

https://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/news/fin-de-la-premiere-etape-du-chantier-du-maxi-banque-populaire-ix

PUBLICATION: July 19,2018           LAST MODIFICATION :  August 7, 2018

Three months after a capsize off Morocco, the Maxi Banque Populaire IX has left the Multiplast yard in Vannes, no less than 10 weeks after entering for structural damage repairs. He was transferred to the base of Team Banque Populaire in Lorient where the second stage of the project will take place.

...

 

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