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Off Watch

Cold molded boats, how have they held up?

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Its been 5 years since I sold my last sailboat, the longest I have been without a boat since I started sailing in the late 1970s.  I have just started the process of trying to figure out what my next boat is going to be. Saw a interesting boat last weekend that was built in the early 1980s and was cold molded of cedar. I am wondering how well this type of boats have held up? What things should I be looking out for? How well is the typical surveyor going to be in checking out a cold molded boat? How is the resell value going to be in 5 or 10 years, do the general public think of these as wooden boats? 

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Not sure how well they hold up, but damn they are beautiful. Admired one last Saturday when racing was cancelled, probably late 70s early 80s vintage, and it looked new. So pretty.

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I should add, probably like most things, find a responsible owner that maintains their toys and it will be fine. The one I admired laid on her lines well, had that rounded pinched off morc look, but stood out amongst her dock mates. A real looker she was. 

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If used and maintained, they hold up well. If neglected, particularly if bilge water is left standing, they deteriorate. Rot along the centerline where the hull halves join the keelson is a good place to check. Also leaks around chainplates where they attach to bulkheads, just as a glass boat. I would suggest hiring a surveyor with some  experience with cold-molded boats.

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Actually, it's more about how they are built than anything, but a well built cold-molded boat should last just about forever with a bit of attention.

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A 30 years old cold moulded boat should last longer than the equivalent grp one as long as you don't abandon it.  If it lasted 30 years, the chances are that it was well built. 

You may eventually find localised rot in some places, that can be cured with a few scarf joints. On the other hand you may find that the GRP boat become softer and softer and eventually it is hard to trust it. 

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1975 Davidson built in NZ of kauri, resourcinol glued, owned it about 10 years myself .

We just spent our winter in the pacific islands on it , we got hammered going there in may and we had a couple of  hard days getting out of Fiji a few weeks ago smashing through those trades . Doesn't make any noise, no creaks or groans , no jammed cupboards, no concerns whatsoever about structural integrity.

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7 hours ago, Swabbie said:

this one looks nice 

 

classic-wooden-boat.jpg?w=1263&h=599&fit

Sweet boat, but The hull sides are lapstrake not cold moulded

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Had a nice half tonner, epoxy and dynelmcovered, started to track in the hot sun after it was painted a dark green.

nothing structural, but a pita to fix.

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7 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Had a nice half tonner, epoxy and dynelmcovered, started to track in the hot sun after it was painted a dark green.

If everyone knew they could stop the "IOR death roll" that easily the rule may have lasted longer. ;)

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Dick Newick loved to refer to his epoxy/veneer/ply trimarans as being built of 'Miracle Fiber W'. That often got quizical looks from people and then he would add 'Wood'.

Lots of them still going strong after 3 decades.

37 years old for this one I believe.

Image result for le jeloux trimaran

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On 11/1/2017 at 7:35 AM, Russell Brown said:

Actually, it's more about how they are built than anything, but a well built cold-molded boat should last just about forever with a bit of attention.

Yup, so true.

but get a really good survey.

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1 hour ago, kimbottles said:

Yup, so true.

but get a really good survey.

Agreed.  But also very dependant on how they are maintained.  

Recently surveyed this SoCal icon built by Eichenlaub in 1978.  Still looking good and going strong.

On her way to Oz for a crack at Sydney/Hobart OA honours, so I'm told!

 

Checkmate (2).jpg

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Slightly off topic, but about 20 years ago I surveyed a cool looking 30 something called Zoo (?).  I think it was a Schumacher design, that ended up going to San Francisco.

Anyone know the boat or it's whereabouts?

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There were 2 Zoos, both well known MORC Maxis. Zoo was a G&S. Zoo II was mid-90s for Canada's Cup, can't remember designer.

MORC was a pretty rockin rule. Produced moderate dimensioned boats that sailed nicely. Old boats and production boats remained competitive. Too bad it died out. 

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4 minutes ago, RKoch said:

There were 2 Zoos, both well known MORC Maxis. Zoo was a G&S. Zoo II was mid-90s for Canada's Cup, can't remember designer.

Zoo I was a G&S IOR 1/2 ton design.

Zoo II was a G&S as well and was sold to a Canadian who did some mods.

Zoo  III was a N/M design that won the CC.

All very well sailed by the original owner.

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Thanks Cal. Back of my mind I was thinking there was a third one, but could only remember the MORC boats. Forgot about the 1/2 tonner.

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I was on a 30 year old cold molded sailboat a year ago that was built by Vic Carpenter that was as sound as new. Find a good surveyor and don't be concerned

 

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20 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Dick Newick loved to refer to his epoxy/veneer/ply trimarans as being built of 'Miracle Fiber W'. That often got quizical looks from people and then he would add 'Wood'.

Lots of them still going strong after 3 decades.

37 years old for this one I believe.

Image result for le jeloux trimaran

Wood is good!  (encapsulated in epoxy and fiberglass, of course)

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My boat, built by Schooner Creek Yachts is 20 years old. one and a half inch thick, including the 1 inch Klegicell foam core. Cedar, Meranti, and Fir make up the skins, with 2 layers of 6 oz glass over it all. A Kevlar layer over the inside layers from the bow back ten feet make up the collision barrier. Bashing up the Baja a few years back, this thing just crushed the seas without a quiver. Super strong, super quiet in a seaway, and at 51 feet, only weighs 21,000 pounds. I would do exactly the same if I did it again.. Plus, it's only hit 23 knots three times!

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21 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Agreed.  But also very dependant on how they are maintained.  

Recently surveyed this SoCal icon built by Eichenlaub in 1978.  Still looking good and going strong.

On her way to Oz for a crack at Sydney/Hobart OA honours, so I'm told!

 

Checkmate (2).jpg

That's Juan Shweet Ride

But it's a LOVE AFFAIRE much more than and owned Boat

10 Horses likely easier and cheaper to Own than that ride

But Not the Point, That's Their BABY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Fantastic for them !!

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Re - several comments above . . 

I would not compare a Kauri-made boat to any other wooden craft. 

Kauri is not like other wood. (and you cannot get it anymore, unless you recycle) 

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3 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

WP2.jpg

Is it just me or does that boat have the best name ever?

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6 minutes ago, kinardly said:

But for some reason I always thought Passage was strip planked. No?

Yes, strip planked as I remember. During the rebuild an Imp-style tube frame was built into the interior. This was when they eliminated the mizzen, went way up on the mainmast, and fitted a deeper keel.

strange twist of irony... Though the keel and rudder were removed and reinstalled in Tampa, the majority of the rebuild was done at Courtney Ross's yard on Clearwater Beach. The name of the street the yard was located on is...Windward Passage Lane.

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While not cold molded, Thistles (17 foot one design popular in the US) were built of hot molded plywood (5 veneers @ 1/16" each) starting in 1945 and going into the 1950's / 1960's before switching to glass. Many of these woodies are still going strong and are competitive with brand new glass boats and that is with use of resorcinol instead of epoxy. The class does not allow new cold-molded Thistles to be built due to concerns with cost.

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13 minutes ago, RKoch said:

Yes, strip planked as I remember. During the rebuild an Imp-style tube frame was built into the interior. This was when they eliminated the mizzen, went way up on the mainmast, and fitted a deeper keel.

strange twist of irony... Though the keel and rudder were removed and reinstalled in Tampa, the majority of the rebuild was done at Courtney Ross's yard on Clearwater Beach. The name of the street the yard was located on is...Windward Passage Lane.

Windward Sauage on the beach in Freeport, Bahamas

triple diagonal planked...sitka spruce Bob Johnson had accumulated from his lumber empire

WP.jpg

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We're getting older and slower!  How could it take this long....

 

ragtime.jpg

 

to bring up one of the most iconic woodies out there.  Granted, not cold molded, but....

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4 minutes ago, silent bob said:

We're getting older and slower!  How could it take this long....

 

ragtime.jpg

 

to bring up   one    Two of the most iconic woodies out there.  Granted, not cold molded, but....

fixed

Image result for da-woody with ragtime

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On ‎11‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 1:39 PM, Hitchhiker said:

Anyone know the boat or it's whereabouts?

In the same vein... what ever happened to Lois Lane?  Wylie-40, considered "radical" when it first hit the water and one of the prettiest bright-finished boats ever (JMHO)

Russian Wood (Turner 40) also cold-molded and pretty much as strong as a bomb-shelter.

And let's not forget Sweet Okole...

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I'm no expert but as what Ponco and others have said there is cold mold and there's cold mold. There are the ones built with things like West Systems which the wood is much the carrier for the epoxy than a fiberglass cloth and more exotic construction into the mix. Some are more like a glued up wood boat as some of the components. I've seen and sailed and raced on both. Like the Peterson 41 "Wisp" that was pretty bullet proof generally. So painting a broad brush saying "cold mold" IMHO. One of our great builders in our area are these guys: http://www.jespersenboats.com/gallery.html Eric Jespersen and his Dad: Capt. Picard ;) 

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Meat Wad,

Hot-molded was a process where the boat was made of thin wood veneers in a manner similar to that used for plywood (glued with resourcinol and cooked under pressure in an oven), but over a form that made the resulting plywood a boat shape.  Cold-molded used the same idea, but the veneers were glued together with epoxy.  It can be over a form, or over the frames and stringers that make up the structure of the boat.  Neither oven,  nor pressure is required for cold molded, though some cold-molded techniques use vacuum bagging to create pressure.

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And most cold-molded boats have a layer of glass, but it's primarily for ding protection and a painting surface, not for strength (which is in the wood laminate and internal framing).

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6 hours ago, AJ Oliver said:

Re - several comments above . . 

I would not compare a Kauri-made boat to any other wooden craft. 

Kauri is not like other wood. (and you cannot get it anymore, unless you recycle) 

Huon pine eats Kauri.. 

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2 hours ago, Shu said:

Meat Wad,

Hot-molded was a process where the boat was made of thin wood veneers in a manner similar to that used for plywood (glued with resourcinol and cooked under pressure in an oven), but over a form that made the resulting plywood a boat shape.  Cold-molded used the same idea, but the veneers were glued together with epoxy.  It can be over a form, or over the frames and stringers that make up the structure of the boat.  Neither oven,  nor pressure is required for cold molded, though some cold-molded techniques use vacuum bagging to create pressure.

You missed the original cold moulded which used lesser glues than epoxy - Resorcinol, Urea Formaldehyde etc.

With those methods you end up with much more of a "wood" boat than with epoxy laminations where the wood is essentially the fiber in a composite structure - a far stronger and more waterproof method.

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3 hours ago, sledracr said:

In the same vein... what ever happened to Lois Lane?  Wylie-40, considered "radical" when it first hit the water and one of the prettiest bright-finished boats ever (JMHO)

Russian Wood (Turner 40) also cold-molded and pretty much as strong as a bomb-shelter.

And let's not forget Sweet Okole...

Lois Lane was recently restored at great expense after being severely holed on Lake Tahoe, poorly repaired, and pretty much left to rot. Back in the Bay area.

Russian Wood: dropped off the face of the earth? Sold for her ballast?

Sweet Okole: same owner Dean Treadway, 2nd in class, 2016 Pacific Cup.

 

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Cold Molded Boats were the rage in the seventies. Designed for racing, they were light, fast and affordable. I even started a boat building company when i got tired of waiting for quotes from builders from all around the country. Racing owners wanted the boats for the next SORC, the next Block Island Race Week and tutti quanti. There is not always, there is only now.  

784pic1.jpg

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16 hours ago, Shu said:

Meat Wad,

Hot-molded was a process where the boat was made of thin wood veneers in a manner similar to that used for plywood (glued with resourcinol and cooked under pressure in an oven), but over a form that made the resulting plywood a boat shape.  Cold-molded used the same idea, but the veneers were glued together with epoxy.  It can be over a form, or over the frames and stringers that make up the structure of the boat.  Neither oven,  nor pressure is required for cold molded, though some cold-molded techniques use vacuum bagging to create pressure.

 

15 hours ago, RKoch said:

And most cold-molded boats have a layer of glass, but it's primarily for ding protection and a painting surface, not for strength (which is in the wood laminate and internal framing).

Thanks, I asked because I have seen two Mull boats, the 30' and 22', that appear to be be Glass over wood. Without close inspection of the core it is hard to tell if it is a bunch of thin layers glued together or just single core with glass.

The Mull 30 XS, formerly Sparkey,  and the Mull 22 that was the Pocket Rocket proto type. Both boats sit now, the 30 is still a mess and the 22 is on a ranch in Nipomo.

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There are two ways to look at molded wood boats: laminating veneers like using glass fibers or, basically, making your own curved plywood from scratch. It's the same thing, just a different way of thinking about the process.

The WEST System (tm) treats the wood fibers much the same way as unidirectional glass fibers with the epoxy holding the fibers in matrix.

Hot molding was popular after WWII when there were left-over wooden aircraft-manufacturing autoclave facilities. The veneers were bent over molds, then heat and pressure was applied to set the wood and cure the resorcinol glues. This is very much the make-your-own-curved-plywood style. Same glues, same techniques.

Strip Planking is sort of a cross between cold molding and carvel construction. Strip planking is popular on larger boats and on canoes and kayaks. Strip planking is the most like carvel planking except the strakes are edge-glued instead of caulked, which makes for a monocoque structure as opposed to plank-on-frame. Strip planked boats can have frames but typically the frames are fewer and more strategically placed. For a given amount of wood, strip planking is much stronger than carvel planking but the trade-off is that strip planking is much more difficult to repair.

Cold-molded hulls are more like laminated composites such as fiberglass or carbon fiber then like traditional carvel planking.

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32 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

Hot molding was popular after WWII when there were left-over wooden aircraft-manufacturing autoclave facilities.

Adding to this: a lot of the difference is related to the evolution of the adhesives.

"hot molding" required heat (~300F) and pressure in order for the adhesives to generate the bond required, so, basically could only be done with the use of large autoclaves.

"cold molding" came along when adhesives were developed that would generate the bond at room temperature and contact pressure.  Basically all you needed was clamps (or often staples) to hold the pieces in place until the epoxy cured. 

The Gougeon brothers, in their book on boat construction, don't actually refer to their approach as "cold molding"... they refer to it as "wood epoxy laminating technique(s)", and note that there are a number of ways to laminate up a hull with wood.  Among them
-- the "mold" method
-- the "strip plank" method
-- the "stringer/frame" method

The core bit, though, as Somebody Else notes above, is that all of these techniques center on using wood as the "fiber" holding the epoxy in matrix.

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23 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Adding to this: a lot of the difference is related to the evolution of the adhesives.

"hot molding" required heat (~300F) and pressure in order for the adhesives to generate the bond required, so, basically could only be done with the use of large autoclaves.

"cold molding" came along when adhesives were developed that would generate the bond at room temperature and contact pressure.  Basically all you needed was clamps (or often staples) to hold the pieces in place until the epoxy cured. 

The Gougeon brothers, in their book on boat construction, don't actually refer to their approach as "cold molding"... they refer to it as "wood epoxy laminating technique(s)", and note that there are a number of ways to laminate up a hull with wood.  Among them
-- the "mold" method
-- the "strip plank" method
-- the "stringer/frame" method

The core bit, though, as Somebody Else notes above, is that all of these techniques center on using wood as the "fiber" holding the epoxy in matrix.

I always thought WEST stood for "wood epoxy saturation technique"

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2 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

I always thought WEST stood for "wood epoxy saturation technique"

My understanding is they originally were going to more appropriately call it West Epoxy Coating Technique - but WECT didn`t sound so good, so they re-termed it and used the acronym WEST - which rolls of the tongue a whole lot better.

Probably has lead to a lot of misunderstanding since the epoxy doesn`t truly saturate the wood.

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2 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

I always thought WEST stood for "wood epoxy saturation technique"

It does.  That's their trade-name for the "system" of epoxies, thickeners, dispensers, application tools, etc that the Gougeon brothers developed and marketed to people who want to build laminated shapes out of epoxy-saturated wood.  (Even at that, note that the wood doesn't get "saturated" with epoxy, it just gets a nice even-thickness bonding layer.)

I guess my point was that even with the WEST system a boat might not be "cold molded", at least in their vernacular, since "molded" to them is a different construction method than "strip planked", even if both use the same woods and epoxies.

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1 hour ago, DamnSkippy said:

IMG_0909.JPG

I believe that is considered art. So not a boat. 

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I think that WOOD ENCAPSULATION SYSTEM TECHNIQUE would have been a better description of the process. The degree of saturation in minimal but if the wood is properly encapsulated with an adequate thickness to prevent water and WATER VAPOR penetration it can last for a long time. Big difference!

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I’ve had great FG and cold molded boats, but I really do like wood, both aesthetically (quiet) and to work with. My cold molded S&S one-tonner is in it’s 47th year (1971 launch), and the structure of the hull appears as strong as ever. She has seen reasonable care and maintenance- apart from some cosmetic neglect I am working to rectify- but has not been babied and has always been in the water year round. I attribute a lot of the condition to a very high quality original build. I think you need to find a surveyor who understands this kind of construction and knows what to look for. In my experience they will all say they do, but get a recommendation from someone who really understands these boats. A lot of cold molded boats are going to be one-off, and the design probably has more to do with resale value than the hull material. 

Personally, I worry less about my wood hull than I did about the integrity of my previous FG boat with cored decks. 

Mine is a resorcinol glued kauri vessel, triple skin, one fore and aft layer and two diagonal layers, and was sheathed with glass when originally built. Resorcinol creates a very strong and waterproof bond that is highly durable, but unlike epoxy it requires a narrow temperature range to bond properly and is not gap filling, so it is unforgiving of imperfect joinery. 

In stripping the topsides this year I found only a couple of very small pockets of rot, both in places where conventional joinery was used on the plywood cabin top, none in the cold molded hull. Both areas were where glass sheathing ended and allowed moisture to get into the edge grain of plywood cabin sides. This despite the gap being nearly invisible under years of paint.  Repair was very easy, and now the entire cabin is sheathed in epoxy and glass. My observation is that encapsulation is a key to longevity- keeping water from working its way into the wood and being trapped. That’s far easier to accomplish with epoxy encapsulation. Good design helps also- drip caps over coaming or cockpit edges to lead rainwater away from end grain, that sort of detail. Look at the edges of things and at joints- where parts of the hull or cabin come together. 

As far as longevity and maintenance goes wood-epoxy construction has a lot more in common with glass boats than with traditional wood construction. Quality of build matters more than material.  

I also have a hot molded Finn dinghy built in the UK in 1954 (believed to be US #11), still in good shape despite being stolen from the Santa Cruz harbor in the early ’80’s and left in the open for more than a dozen years before being recovered. I still have a wood-epoxy (western red cedar) peapod rowing boat I built in the mid 1970’s that has been outside it’s entire life and is beat up but still sound. At one point it was broken in half against a pier and repaired- something I don’t think would have been possible with other construction techniques. It has never had any delamination or rot. Ditto for a couple of other small cold molded boats I have built. Not delaminating or rotting, I mean. Only the one boat broke in half. 

There are plenty of other things to be concerned about in a 30 year old boat, iI wouldn’t dwell over much on the hull material so long as it’s well built and reasonably maintained. 

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As far as longevity and maintenance goes wood-epoxy construction has a lot more in common with glass boats than with traditional wood construction. Quality of build matters more than material.  

The Readers Digest version.

There's an old Peterson One Tonner around here (Distant Drummer) built in the 70's by a very good yard to a very high standard. I saw it a couple of years ago after it got fresh varnish - it has always been finished bright - and it looked like it was near new. Absolutely gorgeous.

If I was going to build from scratch I wouldn't consider anything but cold moulded - veneer layers over strip planking. It can give you a monocoque hull so strong and stiff that bulkheads become little more than partitions.

For anyone who has questions about this system I would recommend they read the Gougeons book - it's the bible of the method. John Guzzwells book too because it covers the non-epoxy techniques of the method.

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7 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

For anyone who has questions about this system I would recommend they read the Gougeons book - it's the bible of the method. John Guzzwells book too because it covers the non-epoxy techniques of the method.

https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/GougeonBook-061205-1.pdf

And it's free online.  

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When I was in high school (1983) I was involved in the construction of this boat built to the MORC rule.  I found her this year; I'd say she aged better than I did.

The outer laminate on this one is mahogany for better strength and aesthetics than the inner layers of western red cedar.

3706996_0_20110908104202_26_0.jpg

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3 minutes ago, pasta514 said:

When I was in high school (1983) I was involved in the construction of this boat built to the MORC rule.  I found her this year; I'd say she aged better than I did.

The outer laminate on this one is mahogany for better strength and aesthetics than the inner layers of western red cedar.

3706996_0_20110908104202_26_0.jpg

this is 1984 and 2017:

1-n_g11ahaywe4p0136.jpg

1-DSC07505.JPG

3-DSC07493.JPG

1-DSC07496-002.JPG

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Sweet.

I've said before that I wish the MORC rule had gained some traction here - it seemed to produce much nicer boats than IOR which was the biggy here.

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Sweet.

I've said before that I wish the MORC rule had gained some traction here - it seemed to produce much nicer boats than IOR which was the biggy here.

It was a very good rating rule. Pretty fair to most boats. The 'typical' boat didn't plane, but was a fairly easily-driven displacement hull with modest sail area that was a good bit faster for the same loa than an IOR design. Planing boats weren't killed, and did well when they had their conditions. WL-24s and Lindenburg 28s were competitive in MORC. Several R/Cers were good MORC boats for years also, like the S2s.

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On 10/31/2017 at 8:52 PM, Off Watch said:

Its been 5 years since I sold my last sailboat, the longest I have been without a boat since I started sailing in the late 1970s.  I have just started the process of trying to figure out what my next boat is going to be. Saw a interesting boat last weekend that was built in the early 1980s and was cold molded of cedar. I am wondering how well this type of boats have held up? What things should I be looking out for? How well is the typical surveyor going to be in checking out a cold molded boat? How is the resell value going to be in 5 or 10 years, do the general public think of these as wooden boats? 

Quit teasing us and give us a photo already.

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On 11/2/2017 at 12:11 PM, Great Red Shark said:

How does a 30-year old sportscar "hold up" ?      Depends on who was looking after it !

 

65 and still going strong, thanks for asking. Mrs S doing a fine job.

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Old movie showing how a Firefly was built by hot molding. Same technique as for other hot molded boats such as Finns, Thistles, etc.

 

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On 11/4/2017 at 3:07 PM, 12 metre said:

My understanding is they originally were going to more appropriately call it West Epoxy Coating Technique - but WECT didn`t sound so good, so they re-termed it and used the acronym WEST - which rolls of the tongue a whole lot better.

Probably has lead to a lot of misunderstanding since the epoxy doesn`t truly saturate the wood.

It does not. (unless you're feeding it into soft end-grain like balsa in which it does partially saturate)

But there's a trick Russell Brown talks about. When you're coating the wood with unthickened epoxy in preparation for clear-coating or bonding with a thicker mixture, pre-heat the wood -- not the epoxy(!) -- with a heat gun or hair drier. Then roll on your epoxy. As the wood cools, the epoxy is drawn tighter into the grain and surface bubbling is pretty much eliminated.

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4 hours ago, Alan Crawford said:

Old movie showing how a Firefly was built by hot molding. Same technique as for other hot molded boats such as Finns, Thistles, etc.

 

I've got a 70 year old International 14 built this exact method (Douglas & McLeod, Ohio)... Still Stiff, still strong, granted very well maintained.

It won't win any trophies today except for looking gorgeous but cool none the less.

 

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Anybody know of any cold molded MORC boats still on the Great Lakes?

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21 minutes ago, bjp said:

Anybody know of any cold molded MORC boats still on the Great Lakes?

Isn't Horse up there? I think it was cold-molded.

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Owned this log for the past 15 years or so.

40 +years old strip plank hardwood hull no glass.

12+years on a 2 pack epoxy hull finish and has a few more seasons left.

 Yup she needs care and attention but don't they all  and I have ever only had to fix some minor rot in the stanchion bases and a patch in the rudder stock which I am attending to at the present.

Haul the old girl every 3 years and spend a week attending to her needs.

4k2Svv8.jpg

 

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Owned this log for the past 15 years or so.

40 +years old strip plank hardwood hull no glass.

12+years on a 2 pack epoxy hull finish and has a few more seasons left.

 Yup she needs care and attention but don't they all  and I have ever only had to fix some minor rot in the stanchion bases and a patch in the rudder stock which I am attending to at the present.

Haul the old girl every 3 years and spend a week attending to her needs.

4k2Svv8.jpg

 

 

 

Beautiful.  What is it?  Got any more pics?

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48 minutes ago, bjp said:

Anybody know of any cold molded MORC boats still on the Great Lakes?

Pinocchio was in Milwaukee last time I saw her about 10yrs ago.  Clear finish G&S 30 that won it's class in the '81 MORC Internationals.  

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2 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Beautiful.  What is it?  Got any more pics?

Alan Claude Smith 32 Planet class one of 6 built here in the roaring forties

Like a Twister 28 or Holman Pye.

She has always safely deposited me and my family back to the dock somewhat wet but smiling.

 

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Put this in the old girl and voila 5.5 ton speed boat

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Just came across this by accident and remembered this thread.

From Martin King, Bruce King's son.  Referring to Unicorn pictured below.

12-25-2007, 04:23 PM
Those boats were modeled after Unicorn, my dad's personal boat. Unicorn was a 41' cold
molded ketch 3/4 built by Gil Iwamoto in costa mesa, and finished
at Driscolls in San Diego.
The underbody on Unicorn was modeled after
the 39/46 but the waterlines aft were broader..fairing into that heart
shaped transom. With a clipper bow and other traditional styling cues,
Unicorn was a real sleeper, often suprising people who saw her sail
right through their lee, sometimes with the steering locked off, so 
well balanced was her sail plan. I guess I should mention that she
was the first cold molded epoxy boat my father built, and in that
regard, was experimental. While loving the looks of traditional wooden
boats, my dad was wary of the rapid decay problems and was looking
for a way to build in wood that addressed those issues. Cold molding
in epoxy solved that problem and ushered in a new wave of building. This
boat spawned not only the smaller versions built in Vancouver, but lead
directly to Whitehawk and the large scale customs that were to come
in the following decades.
Martin

post-703-063629400 1321975155.jpg

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