• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sign in to follow this  
Peanut Butter

Rememberance Anarchy

Recommended Posts

How about some props for the fighting men and women, not only among us, but also long gone, who survived great horrors - Axis and Allies - so that the gene pool could continue. 

Among the many that fought and fell in my own family, I always think of one of my grandfathers: having been lucky enough to survive the unmentionable inhumanity of WW1, he was thereafter drafted into service for WW2. After being captured at Stalingrad, he was interned in Siberia, where he escaped and traveled by foot under the cover of night until he reached home; only to promptly die. I still wear his watch every day. 

That was his life. His lot. And yet I am here. 

Many of us likely have similar stories in our bloodline of someone who would have loved to have had the freedom and opportunity to bitch about random fuckery on the water, only they were too busy shitting their pants and praying for mercy in a trench, battlefield, or jungle. 

To all, thank you. May you be honoured. If only for a minute. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband's grandfather enlisted in WWI when he was 14 years old.  Last spring, we found his uniform, still in good condition, while we were cleaning out my mother-in-law's house after she passed away.  We also found several letters that he had written while fighting in France.  Amazing treasures to pass on to our son someday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rather than anecdotes my father and his generation told me, I like to post this each November - it really makes one think about the subject.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=war+cemeteries&dcr=0&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjhxfmY86PXAhUI0oMKHU7cD_8QsAQIkgE&biw=1920&bih=940

If you click on the pictures you will find that the vast majority of them are in Europe - no-one is better at killing their fellow man in huge quantities than Europeans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Rather than anecdotes my father and his generation told me, I like to post this each November - it really makes one think about the subject.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=war+cemeteries&dcr=0&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjhxfmY86PXAhUI0oMKHU7cD_8QsAQIkgE&biw=1920&bih=940

If you click on the pictures you will find that the vast majority of them are in Europe - no-one is better at killing their fellow man in huge quantities than Europeans

Some of the Mongols were pretty efficient at mass slaughter but they didn't have the same single-minded devotion to the task.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My father didn't talk about his service much. It was only when my oldest brother was coming up on draft age that Dad started talking about his experiences, and then within the year he passed at the age of 45. So he didn't tell all his stories, and he didn't share them with all of us. However, a guy is writing a book about my father's unit and has shared a lot of the info he has learned. 

When he started researching this unit (after his father who was the CO passed) he found 7 out of the original 40 men still alive, now its down to 3. Its the memories of these men along with researching military records that this author has gotten his info. 

My Father as it turns out was one of the first Scout Snipers in the Marine Corp, as far as this author could determine it was the second Scout Sniper unit ever, in the USMC. On my Father's 18th birthday (he enlisted on his 17th) he was one of the first 20 US Military Men to land on Saipan during what they called D-Day in the Pacific. He went on in the next few weeks to be put up for the Naval Cross by his LT (it was downgraded to a Bronze Star with V device). And he was one of the first 6 US military people to enter a Japanese Capital city, on Saipan. According to the book he saw more fighting in weeks, then most of us could imagine in a lifetime. Then when they were done on Saipan his unit packed up and started all over on Tinian (which sounded like a picnic compared to Saipan). 

When I asked him how he won the bronze star he told me his friends were hungry so he went out to get them some chicken to eat. The reality of it is he was one of 5 guys sent to do recon at night to find the Japanese Generals new headquarters location. Took all night of hiking through the jungle and the squad leader was shot and killed. But in the end the info they returned with sped up the end of the war. And for his actions trying to save the squad leader's life he was given his medal. 

At some point he was sent back to the USA for surgery to remove shrapnel and he was in NYC on VJ day. He was in Times Square celebrating when he was almost hit on the head by a typewriter someone threw out a window. Imagine going through all of that and almost getting killed by a typewriter. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2017 at 7:44 PM, SloopJonB said:

Rather than anecdotes my father and his generation told me, I like to post this each November - it really makes one think about the subject.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=war+cemeteries&dcr=0&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjhxfmY86PXAhUI0oMKHU7cD_8QsAQIkgE&biw=1920&bih=940

If you click on the pictures you will find that the vast majority of them are in Europe - no-one is better at killing their fellow man in huge quantities than Europeans

But they're so civilized!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, chinabald said:

My father didn't talk about his service much. It was only when my oldest brother was coming up on draft age that Dad started talking about his experiences, and then within the year he passed at the age of 45. So he didn't tell all his stories, and he didn't share them with all of us. However, a guy is writing a book about my father's unit and has shared a lot of the info he has learned. 

When he started researching this unit (after his father who was the CO passed) he found 7 out of the original 40 men still alive, now its down to 3. Its the memories of these men along with researching military records that this author has gotten his info. 

My Father as it turns out was one of the first Scout Snipers in the Marine Corp, as far as this author could determine it was the second Scout Sniper unit ever, in the USMC. On my Father's 18th birthday (he enlisted on his 17th) he was one of the first 20 US Military Men to land on Saipan during what they called D-Day in the Pacific. He went on in the next few weeks to be put up for the Naval Cross by his LT (it was downgraded to a Bronze Star with V device). And he was one of the first 6 US military people to enter a Japanese Capital city, on Saipan. According to the book he saw more fighting in weeks, then most of us could imagine in a lifetime. Then when they were done on Saipan his unit packed up and started all over on Tinian (which sounded like a picnic compared to Saipan). 

When I asked him how he won the bronze star he told me his friends were hungry so he went out to get them some chicken to eat. The reality of it is he was one of 5 guys sent to do recon at night to find the Japanese Generals new headquarters location. Took all night of hiking through the jungle and the squad leader was shot and killed. But in the end the info they returned with sped up the end of the war. And for his actions trying to save the squad leader's life he was given his medal. 

At some point he was sent back to the USA for surgery to remove shrapnel and he was in NYC on VJ day. He was in Times Square celebrating when he was almost hit on the head by a typewriter someone threw out a window. Imagine going through all of that and almost getting killed by a typewriter. 

Just a small point and a common mistake.  You don't win a medal for valor, you earn it and it is awarded.   It is a conscious act, not a lottery.  A more appropriate way to say it is "He was awarded the Bronze Star", or "He earned the Bronze Star".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my grandfather Collagio Castrovinci , garndmother and mother (6 months old) left Palermo Sicily in 1938 when shit got real bad....got on a boat to NY...after settling down in Westchester   he en;listed in the US Army in 1942 and became an Italian interpreter/infantryman in Patton's Army.  He landed on the beaches of his home in Sicily and helped route out the German and Italian defenders , liberating his family members in Palermo. He was awarded the Bronze Star...  He never talked about his service other  than he was honored to help free his nation from the evil Mussolini.

He went on to fight in the Battle of the Bulge before ending his enlistment and returning back to NY.........he was a honorable man who would bend over backwards for his family and had a work ethic like nobody I have ever seen since right up until the day he died in 1988

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chinabald said:

My father didn't talk about his service much. It was only when my oldest brother was coming up on draft age that Dad started talking about his experiences, and then within the year he passed at the age of 45. So he didn't tell all his stories, and he didn't share them with all of us. However, a guy is writing a book about my father's unit and has shared a lot of the info he has learned. 

When he started researching this unit (after his father who was the CO passed) he found 7 out of the original 40 men still alive, now its down to 3. Its the memories of these men along with researching military records that this author has gotten his info. 

My Father as it turns out was one of the first Scout Snipers in the Marine Corp, as far as this author could determine it was the second Scout Sniper unit ever, in the USMC. On my Father's 18th birthday (he enlisted on his 17th) he was one of the first 20 US Military Men to land on Saipan during what they called D-Day in the Pacific. He went on in the next few weeks to be put up for the Naval Cross by his LT (it was downgraded to a Bronze Star with V device). And he was one of the first 6 US military people to enter a Japanese Capital city, on Saipan. According to the book he saw more fighting in weeks, then most of us could imagine in a lifetime. Then when they were done on Saipan his unit packed up and started all over on Tinian (which sounded like a picnic compared to Saipan). 

When I asked him how he won the bronze star he told me his friends were hungry so he went out to get them some chicken to eat. The reality of it is he was one of 5 guys sent to do recon at night to find the Japanese Generals new headquarters location. Took all night of hiking through the jungle and the squad leader was shot and killed. But in the end the info they returned with sped up the end of the war. And for his actions trying to save the squad leader's life he was given his medal. 

At some point he was sent back to the USA for surgery to remove shrapnel and he was in NYC on VJ day. He was in Times Square celebrating when he was almost hit on the head by a typewriter someone threw out a window. Imagine going through all of that and almost getting killed by a typewriter. 

Not to take anything away in the least from your Dad's actions but one of the things that I didn't become aware of until well along in life was how incredibly common that sort of bravery was.

One of my staff advised me that his Dad was featured in a book called "Uncommon Valour" about his war experiences as a tank commander and the decorations he earned. I read the book and realized that this was just a guy from a small town - an accountant IIRC - who did these incredible things, mostly because they were thrust upon him. After reading the book and thinking about it I thought a better title would have been "Common Valour".

Those of us who never fought in a war really can't imagine how ordinary people rise to the occasion in the worst circumstances.

If you really want to know where it can go (and scare the shit out of yourself) look up and read the citations for those who were awarded the V.C. and/or the CMH - some of the stories will age you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Tucky said:

I'm sure many of you have seen this, but worth mentioning is this description by General John Kelly of the last six seconds of the lives of two marines, Corporal Jonathan Yale and Lance Corporal Jordan Herter, in Iraq.

 

I traveled to Ramadi the next day and spoke individually to a half-dozen Iraqi police all of whom told the same story. The blue truck turned down into the alley and immediately sped up as it made its way through the serpentine. They all said, “We knew immediately what was going on as soon as the two Marines began firing.” The Iraqi police then related that some of them also fired, and then to a man, ran for safety just prior to the explosion.

 

All survived. Many were injured … some seriously. One of the Iraqis elaborated and with tears welling up said, “They’d run like any normal man would to save his life.”

What he didn’t know until then, he said, and what he learned that very instant, was that Marines are not normal. Choking past the emotion he said, “Sir, in the name of God no sane man would have stood there and done what they did.”

“No sane man.”

“They saved us all.”

What we didn’t know at the time, and only learned a couple of days later after I wrote a summary and submitted both Yale and Haerter for posthumous Navy Crosses, was that one of our security cameras, damaged initially in the blast, recorded some of the suicide attack. It happened exactly as the Iraqis had described it. It took exactly six seconds from when the truck entered the alley until it detonated.

You can watch the last six seconds of their young lives. Putting myself in their heads I supposed it took about a second for the two Marines to separately come to the same conclusion about what was going on once the truck came into their view at the far end of the alley. Exactly no time to talk it over, or call the sergeant to ask what they should do. Only enough time to take half an instant and think about what the sergeant told them to do only a few minutes before: “ … let no unauthorized personnel or vehicles pass.”

 

The two Marines had about five seconds left to live. It took maybe another two seconds for them to present their weapons, take aim, and open up. By this time the truck was half-way through the barriers and gaining speed the whole time. Here, the recording shows a number of Iraqi police, some of whom had fired their AKs, now scattering like the normal and rational men they were—some running right past the Marines. They had three seconds left to live.

For about two seconds more, the recording shows the Marines’ weapons firing non-stop…the truck’s windshield exploding into shards of glass as their rounds take it apart and tore in to the body of the son-of-a-bitch who is trying to get past them to kill their brothers—American and Iraqi—bedded down in the barracks totally unaware of the fact that their lives at that moment depended entirely on two Marines standing their ground. If they had been aware, they would have know they were safe … because two Marines stood between them and a crazed suicide bomber.

The recording shows the truck careening to a stop immediately in front of the two Marines. In all of the instantaneous violence Yale and Haerter never hesitated. By all reports and by the recording, they never stepped back. They never even started to step aside. They never even shifted their weight. With their feet spread shoulder width apart, they leaned into the danger, firing as fast as they could work their weapons. They had only one second left to live.

 

The truck explodes. The camera goes blank. Two young men go to their God.

Six seconds.

Not enough time to think about their families, their country, their flag, or about their lives or their deaths, but more than enough time for two very brave young men to do their duty … into eternity. That is the kind of people who are on watch all over the world tonight—for you.

Moved from another thread because it belongs here. 

Semper Fi, Marines. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Not to take anything away in the least from your Dad's actions but one of the things that I didn't become aware of until well along in life was how incredibly common that sort of bravery was.

One of my staff advised me that his Dad was featured in a book called "Uncommon Valour" about his war experiences as a tank commander and the decorations he earned. I read the book and realized that this was just a guy from a small town - an accountant IIRC - who did these incredible things, mostly because they were thrust upon him. After reading the book and thinking about it I thought a better title would have been "Common Valour".

Those of us who never fought in a war really can't imagine how ordinary people rise to the occasion in the worst circumstances.

If you really want to know where it can go (and scare the shit out of yourself) look up and read the citations for those who were awarded the V.C. and/or the CMH - some of the stories will age you.

The greatest generation was called that for a reason. WWII was full of bad ass American heros (and all other country's had their versions) these were boys who became men in a matter of minutes and lived the rest of their lives with the quiet knowledge of what they did. Good and bad there were some Awefull memories to keep. The vast number of heroic sons of bitches doesn't diminish what any of them did. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chinabald said:

The greatest generation was called that for a reason. WWII was full of bad ass American heros (and all other country's had their versions) these were boys who became men in a matter of minutes and lived the rest of their lives with the quiet knowledge of what they did. Good and bad there were some Awefull memories to keep. The vast number of heroic sons of bitches doesn't diminish what any of them did. 

Absolutely right. "Awful memories" is a rather mild term, most of those men had things in their head they would love to forget.

I was riding around in a tin can off the coast of Lebanon in 1983 when the Marine barracks in Beirut suffered a suicide-bomb truck attack. The situation was -very- unstable and we had a number of incidents right near the coast. Whatever; when we got the news the XO decided to prepare a landing force, just in case.  We were undermanned as it was, about half the engineering watch stations were standing 6 & 6. We were primed to go 8 & 4, more than half the crew volunteered to go. The ship did not have that many M-14s or .45s in the small arms locker, but we were ready to go even if only to carry water, or to help dig.

FB- Doug (ex BT-1 SW, USN)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steamer, you exactly illustrate my point - in similar circumstances kids now would mirror my parents generation in WW II.

That was what I didn't realize until I got fairly old - that despite what they did, they weren't exceptional or extraordinary. They were ordinary people forced into an extraordinary situation - essentially fighting for survival, certainly the survival of their way of life.

That's just how our people react when they have to. They did then and they would again - your story and Tuckey's illustrate that very clearly.

 

Our shot at greatness would be making sure they didn't ever have to.

Unfortunately we have come up very short.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gandfather was in France until he got sick was sent back to England for recouperation then sent to Russa to guard amunition dumps so his war didnt end until July 1919. His brother got T.B in the trenches of France and died as a solder back in Canada in 1918. My son signed up at 18. Thks to all who serve.

Br

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Truly - the old guys only get theirs on Remembrance Day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother served as well as myself. He embraces his status, wears his Veteran's hat a lot. I have a hat he bought me and only wear it once in a while as I don''t really feel comfortable when people take notice and thank me for my service. I think the biggest PTST I have from my service is the treatment we got as civilians when not on base, than and survivors remorse. The short haircut normally was all it took to be recognized as military. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steamer, another Tin Can sailor. Thanks for your service. DD826 USS Agerholm, WestPac 1973

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Guitar said:

Steamer, another Tin Can sailor. Thanks for your service. DD826 USS Agerholm, WestPac 1973

Thank you, brother.

-DSK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/9/2017 at 10:59 AM, Guitar said:

The short haircut normally was all it took to be recognized as military. 

:lol: Boy, wasn't that the truth! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fields of Remembrance at Westminster. Tornado flight in missing man, and Binions poem from the pulpit. 

The dignity of a 1000 yrs of strife. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my grandpa on my father's side enlisted in 1940 and was an MP stationed in Pearl Harbor...yes he was there on Dec. 7....he got lucky and switched duties with another MP that day...he was off with some friends until they heard the explosions and went back to the base....

his entire tour of duty was at Pearl...dealing with the aftermath and then working at the Army Air Base Brig

 

grandpa1.thumb.jpg.5227a05e3c25dafdd9f9e7d463f18832.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well now that it’s the 11th her and past the 11th hour in Europe, I’ll offer my respect for my fellow veterans and again offer the hope that our leaders exercise restraint, seek diplomatic solutions and send those who follow in our footsteps as a last resort with a full understanding of the impacts of the blunt instrument of war.  We have come a long way in avoiding collateral damage but never far enough and innocents will be caoght in the battle and particularly the aftermath. 

Be well, my brothers  

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had Veteran's Day off this year, I took the old man shopping for food a day early. We didn't talk about his WWII combat in the Bulge, we just talked about his new electronic crock pot and all the vegetables he cooks in it. (The VA hospital told him last week to stop eating salt and canned food.)

Maybe he and I can share some of his Black Velvet Whiskey later today. For some reason he likes the cheap stuff and it tastes good to him ... tastes good to me too I guess. He saves the empty plastic flasks and fills them with water and a wedge of a lime to drink through the day. And all of his clothing is still stained from the grease from his machine shop. As of six months ago, he's now too frail to work in his machine shop, so it sits there, unused. I have to find a way to reactivate it, or liquidate it, 67 years worth of machining tools, electronic test equipment, and about five thousand ultrasonic spark plugs.

Old soldiers may fade away, but they tend to leave a lot of work behind, I've noticed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

poppy_1512923c.jpg

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
  Between the crosses, row on row,
  That mark our place; and in the sky
  The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead.   Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
  Loved and were loved, and now we lie
      In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
  The torch; be yours to hold it high.
  If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
      In Flanders fields.

Surgeon Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae
Canadian Expeditionary Force, May 3, 1915

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My great uncle:

http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/memorials/canadian-virtual-war-memorial/detail/1596884

From Nova Scotia. His name is on the Menin Gate Memorial

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My uncle Mike hit Juno Beach second wave on D Say was wounded recovered and became a behind the lines sniper in Glengarry Highlanders

He lived to be 93 

Hard ass like you can't imagine but an equally  funny and quick to mile 

It was said of the Regiment that it "never failed to take an objective; never lost a yard of ground; never lost a man taken prisoner in offensive action.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, HuronBouy said:

My uncle Mike hit Juno Beach second wave on D Say was wounded recovered and became a behind the lines sniper in Glengarry Highlanders

He lived to be 93 

Hard ass like you can't imagine but an equally  funny and quick to mile 

It was said of the Regiment that it "never failed to take an objective; never lost a yard of ground; never lost a man taken prisoner in offensive action.

 

Huron - can you rewrite the highlight?

Your uncle sounds like a badass but Canadian regiments pretty consistently punch above their weight. They were the only ones to achieve all their objectives on D-Day.

That strutting fool Montgomery took weeks to achieve his D-Day objectives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correction 

My uncle Mike hit Juno Beach second wave on D Day was wounded, recovered and became a behind the lines sniper in Glengarry Highlanders

Hard ass like you can't imagine but equally  funny and quick to smile 

Never mind moron Monty  

Don't; get me going about Lord Mountbatten, (Charlies role model)

The best thing the IRA ever did was taking that mother fucker out 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep.

My two Australian grandfathers each lost two brothers in The Great War.  My parents, who both served in WW2, each lost a brother in that one.

They didn't talk about it much.

Don't forget. And for God's sake, let's not repeat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, HuronBouy said:

Correction 

My uncle Mike hit Juno Beach second wave on D Day was wounded, recovered and became a behind the lines sniper in Glengarry Highlanders

Hard ass like you can't imagine but equally  funny and quick to smile 

Never mind moron Monty  

Don't; get me going about Lord Mountbatten, (Charlies role model)

The best thing the IRA ever did was taking that mother fucker out 

 

Totally - I first said that when they blew Uncle Dickie up. Too bad they didn't do it during the 20's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, HuronBouy said:

Correction 

My uncle Mike hit Juno Beach second wave on D Day was wounded, recovered and became a behind the lines sniper in Glengarry Highlanders

Hard ass like you can't imagine but equally  funny and quick to smile 

Never mind moron Monty  

Don't; get me going about Lord Mountbatten, (Charlies role model)

The best thing the IRA ever did was taking that mother fucker out 

 

Don't get me started on either one of those fools.  Legends in their own minds.  For that matter, don't get me started on the Brits in general. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is rumoured that when informed of the Canadian casualties on Dieppe aorund 3600 in one day) he said they were only "colonials". 

Ok now you got me going

next topic India 

or bragging to Stalin he had ties  by blood to the Russian Royalty hoping to get a state visit.

 

   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HuronBouy said:

It is rumoured that when informed of the Canadian casualties on Dieppe aorund 3600 in one day) he said they were only "colonials". 

Ok now you got me going

next topic India 

or bragging to Stalin he had ties  by blood to the Russian Royalty hoping to get a state visit.

 

   

I doubt that even he said that. He was on record as thinking Dieppe was necessary for the troops to get "blooded".

I can't imagine that he ever got blooded - did he ever leave England during the war?

Must have been an incredible humiliation for him when his wife fucked around with Nehru - a WOG ferfuckssake! :o:D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He might not have said it but it was unspoken attitude on many British General Gallipoli was another example 

But maybe its just my disdain for British Royalty  getting in the way. 

Isn't getting blooded being smeared with the blood of the first deer you kill?

They were both kinda loose he had many affairs too. When he was head of British forces in south east asia he was constantly overruled on his military plans he was a complete ningcumpoop   as the royalty would say.

    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our local TV station started a 'honor our Vets' tribute thing a couple of weeks ago. You could go to station website and give particulars and a photo of a friend or relative vet and they would play it at the start of the 5PM news. Seemed like a good thing and was thinking of putting my Dad on there, even though he abhorred the connotation of 'Vet' but that is another story.

    Then last night I was surprised to see a guy featured with rank and years of service who I had heard was dishonorably discharged. Called his wife and she just laughed and said he probably nominated himself. Sort of taints the whole thing for me and adds credence to my Dad's objections to being labeled a 'VET'. I did some Googling and found that a dishonorable discharge is pretty serious stuff and if one gets court marshalled and given one then you lose all veteran benefits. Also looked at some of the 'Stolen Valor' sites and see that any such mis-representation is not taken lightly. 

    Not ready to out the bastard but want to confirm his discharge and status. Also makes me wonder if the TV station does any confirmation before putting ones mug on the tube. This is how FAKE NEWS comes about. 

    Anyone here have any further thought on such misuse of 'Remembrance'?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed Sloop. 

Image result for stolen valor meme

    I knew a SEAL who was ready to go ballistic on a guy who claimed to have served with the SEALs. Put it on a resume for a job with the VI govt and he got the job until a local newspaper guy did the check on his background. Wrote a great article and the bastard liar almost got a late night visit from a real SEAL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upon reflection I have decided that they should be jailed and the other inmates advised that they are child molesters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Our local TV station started a 'honor our Vets' tribute thing a couple of weeks ago. You could go to station website and give particulars and a photo of a friend or relative vet and they would play it at the start of the 5PM news. Seemed like a good thing and was thinking of putting my Dad on there, even though he abhorred the connotation of 'Vet' but that is another story.

    Then last night I was surprised to see a guy featured with rank and years of service who I had heard was dishonorably discharged. Called his wife and she just laughed and said he probably nominated himself. Sort of taints the whole thing for me and adds credence to my Dad's objections to being labeled a 'VET'. I did some Googling and found that a dishonorable discharge is pretty serious stuff and if one gets court marshalled and given one then you lose all veteran benefits. Also looked at some of the 'Stolen Valor' sites and see that any such mis-representation is not taken lightly. 

    Not ready to out the bastard but want to confirm his discharge and status. Also makes me wonder if the TV station does any confirmation before putting ones mug on the tube. This is how FAKE NEWS comes about. 

    Anyone here have any further thought on such misuse of 'Remembrance'?

Shave their head, kick 'em the nuts.

Come back tomorrow and kick 'em in the nuts again.

A person would have to be a pretty miserable pissant to want to brag about being in the military when he wasn't. But then, I guess they don't need to be punished any more than life has already done it for us.

-DSK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steam,

     The guy I saw honored on the TV station was an officer and in the service for 20 years which was mentioned in the TV piece. The thing I take exception to is that he got a dishonorable discharge (which I am trying to confirm) for some stunt he pulled and it is my understanding that a dishonorable discharge would take away any veteran benefits and I would think that would include being honored in such a manner. But maybe you can't unring that bell. I've found some download forms that I can request his status upon leaving the service and will try and substantiate the stories I had heard about the nature of his undoing.  Bragging about being in the military after being drummed out due to his dishonorable actions is actually worse in my book than bragging about being in the service without actually having been is even worse. I'll see what shakes out.

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gotta say......if you’re 40, or 50, or 60 and still chewing on your service - good or bad - frequently....you need to let it go. I don’t own any item of clothing or hat or anything that says “I was”. I don’t hide it, I’ll occasionally chat about it in general terms if it comes up, but it’s not front and center in my everyday. I’m a vet, I pulled my weight. I can’t say I’m glad I did, but I’m proud that I did. I’m proud of the people I was with. I had it worse than some and way better than quite a few. But it’s done....a long time ago. Other than that infrequent moment when you stand with others in remembernce of your shared experience......just let it go......

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this