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So  I finally got my act together and jumped on the Evo to race. # of them have gone through the shop since September, but got sold before I can actual go out and race it.We loaded the truck, hooked the dolly/trailer combo and hit the road South to Canyon Lake for the 2017 Wurstfest Regatta. I raced it on Portsmouth and it was light air racing both days. 

The boat is great, stable and very darn quick. I have not sailed it in medium or even heavy air yet, but so fat  it is way beyond my expectations.

Here are some shots:
 

IMG_8115..jpg

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2 hours ago, Holo Nui said:

Rod, the VX Evo performed very well and was sailed really well.  Congrats.  

Thank you. It was real fun stuff. Good racing with ya'll!!  Let's do it again. Next time has to be more wind to keep things better for everybody.

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I asked Rod several times to stop embarrassing us - he just smiled and sailed on toward the horizon.  

Beat me by one hour (!) ET on the last race.  Truly embarrassing.  

Good job, Rod!  Love your attitude!  

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Rod, Brian says the new bulb dagger-board ( more stability? ) is near. Keep us all updated on this option and the general opinion of the performance changes. Could be a game-changer for us older and less athletic sailors. Waiting. 

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Right on!  

The first keel is already in on the way from the factory. It looks really cool and weights about 45 lbs. The board itself has been reinforced to tolerate the load and avoid flexion. There will be some testing in NE and then will come South and I will report.

With the form stability the boat has as well as the buoyancy, I actually think it will help a lot for light guys and those who don't want to hike too much  ;)  I know for a fact that I start hiking solid at 8 knots of TWS using the B mainsail, which is the best all around so far (100 sq ft). I am 148 lbs so I and fully hiked at 10 knots on almost any other dinghy I sail  so nothing new there, so it may help. We shall see after some runs with the bulb.
 

IMG_8116..jpg

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15 hours ago, Charlie P Mayer said:

I asked Rod several times to stop embarrassing us - he just smiled and sailed on toward the horizon.  

Beat me by one hour (!) ET on the last race.  Truly embarrassing.  

Good job, Rod!  Love your attitude!  

Charlie,

Thanks for the great vibe!

To be fair the boat did a lot for me due to the horsepower and my weight combined with the light air and fluky conditions that did not cooperate much. I'll check the calendar for the TCC and hopefully sail with you guys again in more fair conditions. 

Good job out there!

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I was lucky enough to take a quick 10 minute test ride at Wurstfest after racing was completed.  The wind was 5-8 so unfortunately didn't get to push anything.

Roll tacking and gybing around the boat is incredibly agile but even for a big guy like me (6'1" 220#) I never felt close to going over, even in such light wind.  The boom was easy to clear and the cockpit is laid out so well with the continuous control lines.

Setting the spin is such a breeze, even easier than the incredibly easy process on the larger VX One.  Of course the wind was light and easy but a few pulls on the continuous halyard and you're set.  As Rod explained it to me on the dock - with no forestay the spin is very easy to handle and gybes are as simple as turning over and letting the wind blow it over to the new side.  Once you mark the correct exit sheeting angle on the lazy sheet it will be even easier!

I would like to take it out in real wind to get a better feel for it but I think this boat executes on what it's designed to do. 

I just hope the price point allows for the needed scale and fleet building to get a class like this off the ground.  At ~15k all in vs an Aero at 10k and a nice user Laser at half that, VX is positioned at the top of the market.  With more expensive sails, parts, and foils that the other 2 options - campaigning is likely to be let's say double the cost.  With the Aero gaining momentum (at least locally here in TX) at it's lower price point, my concern is that people with 15-20k to spend on a boat would prefer to jump into a used Viper, VX One or other.  Is there a market for this dinghy to actually penetrate and develop a class and move beyond "toy" status that plagues so many other expensive solo boats?  I would argue that the price point is too high and Bennett should try to develop a price point that focuses on scaling the class and not upfront returns.  I really like the Winter circuit that Bennett does and this is an example of a revenue stream that could lower up front costs in favor of long term revenues from owners and class building.

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Carsondude, I agree with your post and observations EXCEPT: In the price comparison, I think you may be looking at apples and oranges. The Aero,Laser and VX EVO are not the same (  similar but still quite different and don't forget the Melges 14 ). It all depends on what works for you in your area. Your suggestion that the folks with 15-20 K might head for the used Viper/VX One is valid EXCEPT: you either want a single-handed boat or not. Again, sailors need to choose what works for them. Happy Sailing!

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Agree with xonk1.  The VX Evo is not in the same class as a Laser or Aero.  You are getting a lot more boat with the Evo.  I was expecting more Aeros at Wurstfest, only 7 there, plenty of Lasers.  

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I agree completely that the boats are not comparable in technical terms.

What I'm saying is that the market might not justify the additional features and characteristics over the other options at that price point.  At the end of the day all the boats are competing for the solo dinghy market.  Sure, the guy buying a user laser to dick around in is in a different market than the guy buying the VX Evo.  But, it's still the same general market and I'm skeptical that a class can succeed at the top of any market cost wise.  

Im not talking about boat vs. boat features, I'm talking about what the market will support at what price point. 

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carsondude, good point on the class issue.  I enjoy my Weta but would also enjoy sailing with more like boats in a class.  hopefully something like the VX Evo takes off in TX.  It is a really cool boat.  

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All very valid point guys, but the best so far is Claire's!!  :)

 

Seriously, Carson brings an important point combined with what Holo Nui and Xonk1. The Laser very well established due to time on the market and history plus what we already know and the Aero is on the same category as well as the Melges 14, great boats that work on the future of the Laser. However, there are two key differentiation:  no one over 190 lbs will be competitive on either Aero, Laser or Melges 14 (the latter may be, when using the largest rig option). The VX Evo offers a competitive single-handed that is not boring downwind and competitive for more robust sailors that want to sail solo. Also it offers real time "training wheels" for high performance asymmetrical spinnaker / sportboat sailing as it really teaches key techniques downwind that transfer to bigger boats with similar rig configurations. All this without the complication of the headstay on the way of gybes, hoists and douses. 

Back to the point, yes, is more expensive than other "solo" boats, but if the sailor is over 190 lbs, I really see some struggle on the race course., without mentioning the comfort on the boat. The hard chines and hull form stability really helps the lighter  guys, even though they will be in some disadvantage upwind on breeze conditions, however, once the windward mark is passed, it is game on. (So hang in there, Rod!)

As a reference, a second hand MC Scow in good conditions will be selling for about $16,500 including the road package.  Brand new VX Evo with covers and road package (road trailer and dolly) will be $16,700 including sails.

We are working on getting a 10 boat fleet package for less than $15,000 FOB Vela Sailing Supply headquarters, including sails, top cover, trailer, trolly, sails and complete rigging. More about this later...

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On 11/12/2017 at 7:32 AM, Claire1000 said:

Every one of us that sa that beautiful thing racing surely considered buying one. Super cool boat. 

Thanks Claire. IT was fun to jump on the UFO, I wish we had more wind. I had 1.5 seconds of airborne!!  ;)

 

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Not to be a hater, but the first time I saw Aeros racing downwind was the moment they came off the list of potential boats for me. I don’t care if it’s extra distance sailed, give me a big a kite and let me haul ass rather than cuddling with a mast avoiding death heat or death rolls. 

The aero upwind looks super fun and sails awesome. But we live in a windward leeward world and I’m just done drifting almost dead downwind. 

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19 hours ago, Rodfavela said:

All very valid point guys, but the best so far is Claire's!!  :)

 

Seriously, Carson brings an important point combined with what Holo Nui and Xonk1. The Laser very well established due to time on the market and history plus what we already know and the Aero is on the same category as well as the Melges 14, great boats that work on the future of the Laser. However, there are two key differentiation:  no one over 190 lbs will be competitive on either Aero, Laser or Melges 14 (the latter may be, when using the largest rig option). The VX Evo offers a competitive single-handed that is not boring downwind and competitive for more robust sailors that want to sail solo. Also it offers real time "training wheels" for high performance asymmetrical spinnaker / sportboat sailing as it really teaches key techniques downwind that transfer to bigger boats with similar rig configurations. All this without the complication of the headstay on the way of gybes, hoists and douses. 

Back to the point, yes, is more expensive than other "solo" boats, but if the sailor is over 190 lbs, I really see some struggle on the race course., without mentioning the comfort on the boat. The hard chines and hull form stability really helps the lighter  guys, even though they will be in some disadvantage upwind on breeze conditions, however, once the windward mark is passed, it is game on. (So hang in there, Rod!)

As a reference, a second hand MC Scow in good conditions will be selling for about $16,500 including the road package.  Brand new VX Evo with covers and road package (road trailer and dolly) will be $16,700 including sails.

We are working on getting a 10 boat fleet package for less than $15,000 FOB Vela Sailing Supply headquarters, including sails, top cover, trailer, trolly, sails and complete rigging. More about this later...

You can count me in on the fleet VX Evo purchase if the other nine are active sailors.   The discount will be a bonus.  

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47 minutes ago, sushi said:

You can count me in on the fleet VX Evo purchase if the other nine are active sailors.   The discount will be a bonus.  

  :D You have chosen well for your interests!! ...priceless!!

 

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This has been an interesting thread. Several questions.

 

Regarding the weight of the sailor  and which sail they use, either the A, B, or C, can a heavy sailor change down from an A to a B or C when the wind comes up and they become over powered? I also sail model boats, and rig changes are what allow boats to sail in 0 to 40 mph wind conditions. If one does allow rig changes, it would seem to me that the 155 pound person who was already using the C rig will have a tough time when it’s blowing, say,  25 against a guy who weighs 220, is of comparable ability, and is also in C rig.   I guess my real question is once you start a regatta with a sail size, can it be changed during the regatta?  If Rod is precluded from using anything other than a C rig in light stuff, can the heavyweight guy sail with anything less then an A rig when it cranks?

 

Does the price being mooted Include all three sails?

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2 hours ago, True North said:

This has been an interesting thread. Several questions.

 

Regarding the weight of the sailor  and which sail they use, either the A, B, or C, can a heavy sailor change down from an A to a B or C when the wind comes up and they become over powered? I also sail model boats, and rig changes are what allow boats to sail in 0 to 40 mph wind conditions. If one does allow rig changes, it would seem to me that the 155 pound person who was already using the C rig will have a tough time when it’s blowing, say,  25 against a guy who weighs 220, is of comparable ability, and is also in C rig.   I guess my real question is once you start a regatta with a sail size, can it be changed during the regatta?  If Rod is precluded from using anything other than a C rig in light stuff, can the heavyweight guy sail with anything less then an A rig when it cranks?

 

Does the price being mooted Include all three sails?

Great points Brig.

 As we are on the early stages, we are still investigating and listening about what the best way to organize the multiple sail plan racing scenario: so far I think the first limitation is to avoid super light sailors to use the largest sails, that is simply unfair in light air and I think we can all agree on that. Then the other side of the wind range: heavy air. You are correct, at my weight on a C sail I still will be in disadvantage upwind, against another 200 lbs skipper using the C sail, but that is true on every other class I sail on: Lasers, Sunfish, Aero, etc. so as long as the lighter guy keeps the boat under control, that becomes similar to what happens in any other class with one exception: downwind. These boats do reward light weight downwind and the differences can be important, so I think the playing field kinds of levels up in the heavy air. We still need to accumulate more data about this, though.

 The price we are coming up includes a B sail (100 sq ft) and asymmetrical spinnaker. The A and C sail will be optional and not included on the promo, but we will work on the price for them if somebody wants to add them.

 Me personally, I will have the B and C sails. I do have an A sail for demo purposes, but do not intend to race with it. The A sail threshold is probably a 220 lbs sailor, while the B's may be 190 lbs and the C's 160 lbs.  Again, we are still collecting data and learning.  The 9 boat fleet in Beaufort, SC sails B and C sails and they are all quite competitive.

Data so far has shown that the A will benefit the heavier sailor in the lighter air, but not by a lot more when the wind picks up. The B is still quite powerful and the rig is very manageable. 

The other point to consider is our venue: most regattas are light to medium air, unless you live in Corpus or San Fran. While I do not want to restrict growth of a given rig based on geography, we all know what conditions we sail the most on and can plan the proper sail based on that. Again, early stages and we want to grow it organically and listening what you all have to say.

 

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You know all about why I have a big kite boat, nothing worse than ddw without it, unless maybe yer foiling!

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I have sailed in many regattas ( MC Scow ) where racers could use crew or not in each race AND change crew for any race or not. It seemed a bit unfair especially for racers who did not have many crew of different weights available. With the EVO, I think a possible direction for this question of rigs would be to require each racer to declare their rig choice for the ENTIRE regatta and then be restricted to their choice. However this issue is resolved, some will complain and be unhappy. We should all be thankful that the EVO offers a choice of rigs to TRY to accommodate all racers. Happy Sailing!

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2 minutes ago, xonk1 said:

I have sailed in many regattas ( MC Scow ) where racers could use crew or not in each race AND change crew for any race or not. It seemed a bit unfair especially for racers who did not have many crew of different weights available. With the EVO, I think a possible direction for this question of rigs would be to require each racer to declare their rig choice for the ENTIRE regatta and then be restricted to their choice. However this issue is resolved, some will complain and be unhappy. We should all be thankful that the EVO offers a choice of rigs to TRY to accommodate all racers. Happy Sailing!

That would be my preference - commit and live with it.  

@ rod - is that fleet price valid with a C or A sail in lieu of a B sail?     Is there a limit to boats available at this price?  I have at least two very active friends who want to demo and will probably jump in. 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, sushi said:

That would be my preference - commit and live with it.  

@ rod - is that fleet price valid with a C or A sail in lieu of a B sail?     Is there a limit to boats available at this price?  I have at least two very active friends who want to demo and will probably jump in. 

 

 

Yes, one main of your choice (we list the B as it is the most common so far and probably best all around for most sailors).

There is a promo for "Spring Batch" of ten boats at this price. Here it goes:

7781d137-47fa-4bb9-99fe-a232f89f1f0d.jpgJoin the VX family with the introductory price of $14,990 including (savings of more than $1,800):
• Race ready VX Evo hull, carbon fiber mast and boom and fitted hardware
• North Sails "B" Mainsail (100 sq. Ft).
• Spinnaker (120 sq. ft).
• Top Cover.
• Road trailer.
• Trolly.
 

FOB Vela Sailing Supply, Inc. in Rockwall, TX

Delivery on spring 2018

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23 minutes ago, xonk1 said:

I have sailed in many regattas ( MC Scow ) where racers could use crew or not in each race AND change crew for any race or not. It seemed a bit unfair especially for racers who did not have many crew of different weights available. With the EVO, I think a possible direction for this question of rigs would be to require each racer to declare their rig choice for the ENTIRE regatta and then be restricted to their choice. However this issue is resolved, some will complain and be unhappy. We should all be thankful that the EVO offers a choice of rigs to TRY to accommodate all racers. Happy Sailing!

I'm glad you see it that way as well as Sushi. We are not really sold on the Scow model as the crew is invited or dropped at will and probably not fair; however the numbers as fleets is nowhere near small, so probably people is used to it.

I do like the commit and live with it or a minimum skipper weight rule, similar to what they do on the beach cats, where instead of max weight, you have minimum weight, for example: if you are 165 lbs or less, you cannot sail on anything bigger than a C sail, if you are 195 lbs you cannot sail with a B sail and so on. The numbers are just examples...nothing has been tested about that yet. This does bring a problem, though and it is the fact that the skipper who weights 166 lbs will crush the 165 lbs with the C sail (assuming skill levels are the same and the only variable is the mainsail area). I'm not sold on that concept but is an idea that can evolve down the road and probably work for sanctioned class events.

The only problem to commit and live with one particular sail area is that if a light skipper knows it is going to be light air, he /she will have an advantage over the heavier skipper using the A sail, for example, so does not make it fair again because you may have a 150 lbs sailing against a 220 lbs with the same sail area and definitively will be faster in the light stuff. The same is true as Brig mentioned before when the wind picks up, even with the C sail.

How about sticking to the B sail for OD racing and using the concept of the MC Scow (sail with a crew) and stick with it for the whole regatta?

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4 minutes ago, Rodfavela said:

I'm glad you see it that way as well as Sushi. We are not really sold on the Scow model as the crew is invited or dropped at will and probably not fair; however the numbers as fleets is nowhere near small, so probably people is used to it.

I do like the commit and live with it or a minimum skipper weight rule, similar to what they do on the beach cats, where instead of max weight, you have minimum weight, for example: if you are 165 lbs or less, you cannot sail on anything bigger than a C sail, if you are 195 lbs you cannot sail with a B sail and so on. The numbers are just examples...nothing has been tested about that yet. This does bring a problem, though and it is the fact that the skipper who weights 166 lbs will crush the 165 lbs with the C sail (assuming skill levels are the same and the only variable is the mainsail area). I'm not sold on that concept but is an idea that can evolve down the road and probably work for sanctioned class events.

The only problem to commit and live with one particular sail area is that if a light skipper knows it is going to be light air, he /she will have an advantage over the heavier skipper using the A sail, for example, so does not make it fair again because you may have a 150 lbs sailing against a 220 lbs with the same sail area and definitively will be faster in the light stuff. The same is true as Brig mentioned before when the wind picks up, even with the C sail.

How about sticking to the B sail for OD racing and using the concept of the MC Scow (sail with a crew) and stick with it for the whole regatta?

Probably need to get a few solid season of racing in before any decisions?  Hey there's a selling point for being an early adopter;  you get to be part of the decision making process.  

Has anyone sailed two-up yet?

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How about each competitor is allowed to register 2 Sails a year.....any size.

They can be changed at will throughout a regatta.

The 160 lb guy will have a smaller C than the 200 lb guy .... And the 200 lb guy will have a larger light air A sail. The sail maker will recommend the size that is right for you based on your weight and the range of conditions that Evos are allowed to race in.

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This morning, I had a great exchange with True North about sail selection related to weight during racing and we (mostly him, thank you for that Brig!) came up with, what we think, can be a good starting point:
 

- After collecting some data, establish a weight /sail area criteria.

- Allow to register no more than two sails, being the B sail (100 sq ft) mandatory. For example: B and C or B and A.

- Skippers can change registered sails between races, but support/gear carrier boats are not allowed on the water. Basically is if you have time to get to the dock and change the sail, then you can do it.

Again, these are the first steps...we are all learning what is best as well as collect data.

Flame away!

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If only one sail, then any of the 3 sizes would be OK? I weigh 230 and wouldn't get much use out of the B at my normal venue.

 

 

edit- meaning I wouldn't want to be forced to buy a B sail

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Dex, you’re not forced to buy more than one sail.  The idea is to limit the number of sails when changing up or down to meet wind conditions.  If you’re going to have more than one sail at your disposal at a regatta, one of the sails of the two declared has to be a B sail.  Hopefully that will broaden the competitive weight range.

It is a lovely boat and looks fast sitting on its trailer! My ufo is parked next to Rod’s Evo, and from my cursory look over the boat, the  standard of finish and attention to detail are quite high.  An all up weight of 180# is pretty impressive, too.

 

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1 hour ago, True North said:

Dex, you’re not forced to buy more than one sail.  The idea is to limit the number of sails when changing up or down to meet wind conditions.  If you’re going to have more than one sail at your disposal at a regatta, one of the sails of the two declared has to be a B sail.  Hopefully that will broaden the competitive weight range.

It is a lovely boat and looks fast sitting on its trailer! My ufo is parked next to Rod’s Evo, and from my cursory look over the boat, the  standard of finish and attention to detail are quite high.  An all up weight of 180# is pretty impressive, too.

 

I figured I was just being thick

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23 hours ago, Boom Vang said:

Can we get some close up shots of the cockpit and the controls are laid out?

Vang,

Yes, I planned on shooting the sails laying on top of each other and some images of the cockpit layout, but "wind' got on the way on Saturday, so will do it this week and post.

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22 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

I figured I was just being thick

Dex,

TN explained it quite well. You are not forced to buy more than one main. The initial idea is that , when showing at a regatta and you have more than one sail measured in, one of them must be the B sail. At 230 lbs, the A sail make sense as your all around, but I am sure that when the wind picks up you will enjoy the B sail quite a bit since is still quite powerful and will be easier to handle on big breeze. You can sail with the A all the time if you need/want to, but you have the option of scale down if need to. 

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Rod is right about it being windy on the old lake this Saturday!  The only sailboat on the lake was a 95 cm radio control boat, a Dragon Flite 95, and it was in C rig.  

On the Evo going from A rig to B rig is an 8% reduction in sail area and going from B to C is a 10% reduction.  I hope the concept works well for the Evo in practice.

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On ‎11‎/‎18‎/‎2017 at 3:25 PM, Rodfavela said:

This morning, I had a great exchange with True North about sail selection related to weight during racing and we (mostly him, thank you for that Brig!) came up with, what we think, can be a good starting point:
 

- After collecting some data, establish a weight /sail area criteria.

- Allow to register no more than two sails, being the B sail (100 sq ft) mandatory. For example: B and C or B and A.

- Skippers can change registered sails between races, but support/gear carrier boats are not allowed on the water. Basically is if you have time to get to the dock and change the sail, then you can do it.

Again, these are the first steps...we are all learning what is best as well as collect data.

Flame away!

ah let's not do that  

 

 

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Laser Masters sometimes do this:

Laser Class Rule 28(d) is changed by permission of ILCA North America and all boats will sail in a single fleet. Competitors may swap rigs (Laser Standard, Laser Radial and Laser 4.7) at their discretion, provided that all rig changes are made on shore and all sails have the same number."

 

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1 hour ago, bill4 said:

Laser Masters sometimes do this:

Laser Class Rule 28(d) is changed by permission of ILCA North America and all boats will sail in a single fleet. Competitors may swap rigs (Laser Standard, Laser Radial and Laser 4.7) at their discretion, provided that all rig changes are made on shore and all sails have the same number."

 

That one may work. Have you sailed on any of those events?

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I have once. The event I went to was originally going to have separate starts for radials and regular rigs. The NOR stipulated that if there were less than 15 boats registered in each fleet,  there would be a single fleet and the rule above would apply.  Only 14 radials registered, so they put us all together.When I first heard about it, I kicked up a fuss as it seemed to favor the small sailors. I thought they would have their usual advantage in the light stuff with the regular rig, and if it blew real hard, the radials could still do very well. It blew hard the entire regatta, so my theory could not be tested in its entirety.  The main reason they do this is to make sure there is a sizeable fleet, which makes sense - especially if you don't have that many boats.

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25 minutes ago, bill4 said:

I have once. The event I went to was originally going to have separate starts for radials and regular rigs. The NOR stipulated that if there were less than 15 boats registered in each fleet,  there would be a single fleet and the rule above would apply.  Only 14 radials registered, so they put us all together.When I first heard about it, I kicked up a fuss as it seemed to favor the small sailors. I thought they would have their usual advantage in the light stuff with the regular rig, and if it blew real hard, the radials could still do very well. It blew hard the entire regatta, so my theory could not be tested in its entirety.  The main reason they do this is to make sure there is a sizeable fleet, which makes sense - especially if you don't have that many boats.

Perfect....  I've been looking for an excuse to buy that 250k protector, now i have one..   (assuming there's no rule against a tow to land and back).

 

 

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Bill4, I agree with your reasoning, which is why in theory the idea to limit to two sails based on weight seems a good idea.  Weight still matters — this is a performance boat.  Having the people on either end of the weight spectrum feel as though they have a chance in non-optimal for their weight conditions seems the ticket.  Make the heavy guy have to use a larger sail in the heavy stuff to give the lighter guy a chance going to weather and let the big guy have more sail area in the light stuff.  It’s a theory anyway....  not sure if it’s a good one.

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Another option is to have a single start and use Portsmouth Numbers - which I believe the Aero does (5,7,9).

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25 minutes ago, bill4 said:

Another option is to have a single start and use Portsmouth Numbers - which I believe the Aero does (5,7,9).

When a regatta has sufficient numbers, the three RS Aero rigs race as three separate fleets (sometimes with separate starts, sometimes with a combined start.). When the numbers at an event are not enough to justify that, we race the three rigs in one fleet and score on handicap.

Most serious RS Aero sailors have two rigs and choose which one to use based on wind strength.

There are some rules about rig swapping during regattas. See Section H in http://www.rsaerosailing.org/docs/774840864.pdf

Not saying any of that is right for the VX EVO Class. But it seems to work for us.

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Here are some shots of the sails: We stuck a screwdriver on the lawn at the head and a the Cunningham grommet of all three sails. and you can see the difference on the leech and foot lengths.

 

Sails overlayed.jpg

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Nice pics Rod. Keep 'em coming - especially when you get the weighted daggerboard. Show the hoisting rig and the devices to keep the weighted board in the up and intermediate positions. Then the all-important sailing/stability impressions. Happy Sailing 

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Rod, Also, how 'bout a shot to show the different heads overlapped on the three sails? Thanks

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Went out today with the B sail. Blowing 8 to 15 knots. Complete control upwind and downwind. I do need the C sail I think initially based on my weight of 150 lbs I should stick to it all the time; I was fine most of the time, yet on the big puffs, had to de-power quite a bit . The boat is very noble, slow heeling and plenty of time to adjust, yet I need more meat on the rail.

Downwind was a complete hoot. Gybes we easy, yet I need to refine a  little more the technique to transition a little quicker. Super fun and very, very quick.

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Rod,

 

Is the Evo using the same mast sections all the time, and the sail just get shorter on the foot? Would be nice not to have to carry around spare sections.

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1 hour ago, Ross said:

Rod,

 

Is the Evo using the same mast sections all the time, and the sail just get shorter on the foot? Would be nice not to have to carry around spare sections.

Ross,

That is correct. The mast is a two section CF spar and all three sails fit the same spars. Luff lengths are the same on all sails and it is only the foot and some roach/leech differences in area. Post #49 shows where the differences are. 

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Rod, Good shot of the three heads together for comparison. Nice that they all use the same mast sections. With the Melges 14 you must buy a different upper section to use smaller sails. A bit of a hassle and considerable expense. Score one for the EVO. Still anxious for info/pics of the daggerboard with a bulb option. Stability in an unstable world?

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Xonk1,

Yes, the rig package is a great advantage as it is the same mast and boom compatible with the three mainsails.

As soon as the ballasted board is here, I'll report with pictures and specs.

 

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Thanks Rod - My wife thinks I am more stable already and there seems to be less chance of me going inverted. I almost flipped off the couch when Alabama lost!

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Any idea if An EVO will be in attendance for checking out for Sarasota ?  I’d like to kill two birds with one stone and look for a crew spot in a VX One also 

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4 hours ago, Boom Vang said:

any provisions to launch with lifting rings if you have access to stiff leg rather then a ramp?

 

Vang,

Some owners that have no ramp facilities have made a "3-leg" lifting bridle  by drilling a couple of holes on the gunwale about 6 inches forward of the spinnaker sheet blocks and one going to the upper gudgeon on the transom, which is for balance only. I am working on making some light G10 or CF backing plates for that area on my boat and play a little with the lengths of the line until we have it all squared out. The short answer is YES and it is very simple to adapt the boat to it.

 

 

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On 11/14/2017 at 6:13 PM, Rodfavela said:

  :D You have chosen well for your interests!! ...priceless!!

 

Hull number 13, on its way to Texas. 

 

 

IMG_6155.JPG

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On 11/20/2017 at 3:52 PM, Rodfavela said:

That one may work. Have you sailed on any of those events?

I have as well as the location I race will combine the radial's and full rigs if needed, I've raced against 4.7's in heavy air.  My observations for what they are worth.

Once the announcement comes that fleets will combine everyone ups to the biggest rig they can handle unless we are 4 days into a 5 day event and it's blowing dogs off the chain.  The reason is because the smaller rigs with less sail area aloft have a very difficult time holding the line pre-start and accelerate more slowly off the line.  When that happens in a 40-120 boat fleet your race is done and you are only 20 meters off the line.  Everyone goes for the biggest rig they can handle.  If you look at the numbers for both boats and their rigs you start to see why.

image.thumb.png.6c9da6314147e9f6123e2b69fe55fa07.png

My expectation is that the Evo will suffer less from the start line or lane holding issues of something like the Laser because mast height is the same which gives the smaller sail Evo more clean air for power and the fleets are not large.  As the fleet becomes large and tight this will re-appear, the difference in the top area of the sail from the red sail to the blue and yellow are quite stark.  I wouldn't ever consder going small, instead I would consider increasing the diameter of my vang and having a heavy air main sheet that is larger in diameter so that my hands can better handle trimming both aggressively when breeze is up.

Umm, the Evo+ is a sail design I took to a local loft and asked them to plus size the sail design and if they thought it would work.  The answer is yes but Brian will politely explain that your mast warranty is void if you choose to do so.  The Flamingo is a Laser with the Intensity Powerhead sail and a carbon upper section, it's what I call it locally.

I would be tempted to start the Evo's even with the sail choices, they are too close to know if anything important is there in the difference.  I did not put smaller weights into the D/L, aka the potato chip effect of the boat with the high D/L will still move when the wind is nearly dead.  The lighter boats will do well but the rest of the numbers do not indicate this, I think it will be a wash.

And two people on an Evo in a race?  I like handicap dinghy racing but two crew would not be very OD unless all boats required two crew.

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On 12/9/2017 at 7:21 PM, RedTuna said:

 How many pulls to hoist the chute?  Can it be done from the rail?

 

It will take about 4 pulls to have the chute up. Yes, you can do it from the rail, but probably quicker to stand up (sailing deep for few seconds) hoist and hit your "go fast" angle after finishing hoisting it.

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Rod, Growing more impatient by the day for the ballasted board. I guess at age 68 I just need to grow up and wait! Soon I hope. Thanks

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 Yes, it was yours truly and tow other Evo's hitting the cool waters at Dallas Corinthian Yacht Club this past Sunday. Winds between 6 and 12 knots made it for a great training session. Skipper's weights were: 150, 157 and 179 lbs. All of us used the B Sail and it was quite even. The downwind were surprisingly equal among all three boats,s o the weight did influence, but not as much as I expected. Lots learned and more to come.

IMG_3862.jpg

IMG_3863.jpg

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1 hour ago, xonk1 said:

Rod, Growing more impatient by the day for the ballasted board. I guess at age 68 I just need to grow up and wait! Soon I hope. Thanks

Got it...fair. Have not seen it yet.I'm on it!!

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On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 3:23 PM, Rodfavela said:

Got it...fair. Have not seen it yet.I'm on it!!

still on it?  Or off it, to get back on it again soon?  Only to be off it then on it again until you get tired of trying to be on it - the off it for good.  

 

Nice shots.  Jealous, cant wait for our rides to show up in Jan.   Could have done without the selfie, but eh

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21 hours ago, sushi said:

still on it?  Or off it, to get back on it again soon?  Only to be off it then on it again until you get tired of trying to be on it - the off it for good.  

 

Nice shots.  Jealous, cant wait for our rides to show up in Jan.   Could have done without the selfie, but eh

The selfie was just for you, thought you'd like it.

The keel will be in Sarasota for the VX One Winter Series #1 on January 15th.

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Rod, January 15th is a Monday, MLK Day. When is the series run? I'd like to demo the keel boat so what days would a brief demo sail be available?  Thanks.

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19 hours ago, xonk1 said:

Rod, January 15th is a Monday, MLK Day. When is the series run? I'd like to demo the keel boat so what days would a brief demo sail be available?  Thanks.

X - the Vx one Sarasota event is the 2nd weekend (13th).  Unless I find a ride I'll be bombing around with another evo owner in the bay.  We'll be there most of the week because we're racing a viper that next weekend, not sure what Brian's plan is.  I'd suggest you just rod a call.  

But in the meantime join our Facebook group for VX Evo updates.  

 

https://www.facebook.com/vxevotx/

 

 

 

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On 12/22/2017 at 12:47 PM, xonk1 said:

Rod, January 15th is a Monday, MLK Day. When is the series run? I'd like to demo the keel boat so what days would a brief demo sail be available?  Thanks.

Xonk1,

My bad on the day. It is January 13th and 14th at the Sarasota Sailing Squadron. Sushi's boat will land there on the 12th.

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Not yet. The ballasted board will be tried in SC and we will hear something from the boys there.So fa, I have been fine without it at my 153 lbs but i have not sailed it in anything beyond 15 knots yet, so still a bit unknown.

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Hope the ballasted board is revealed and tested soon before the buzz goes away completely. Could be a game-changer.

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Likewise curious about the ballasted board. However, I don’t see it as a game changer.

  1.  Sounds like the boat will be stable enough without ballast for me (200 lb) based on Rod’s experience at 150. 
  2. I assume that the hull would have to come off the trailer and rolled to insert the minikeel from below. That will add some setup time, and quick setup is a major part of the Evo appeal. I assume once it is inserted the boat can be launched from the trailer/trolley with the minikeel?
  3. I suspect whenever I sail with the minikeel I will wonder if the day would have been more fun with the dagger!

It could be a game changer if the minikeel was demonstrated to have a significant safety benefit. My guess is that it’s not enough ballast to self-right from a knockdown. And with a sealed, buoyant mast, won’t the risk of turtle be low even with the unballasted foil? Furthermore, righting a turtled Evo isn’t likely to be difficult like some of the bigger, wider sportboats.

Appreciate more info on all these issues as folks get experience with both dagger and minikeel.

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13 hours ago, superg said:

Likewise curious about the ballasted board. However, I don’t see it as a game changer.

  1.  Sounds like the boat will be stable enough without ballast for me (200 lb) based on Rod’s experience at 150. 
  2. I assume that the hull would have to come off the trailer and rolled to insert the minikeel from below. That will add some setup time, and quick setup is a major part of the Evo appeal. I assume once it is inserted the boat can be launched from the trailer/trolley with the minikeel?
  3. I suspect whenever I sail with the minikeel I will wonder if the day would have been more fun with the dagger!

It could be a game changer if the minikeel was demonstrated to have a significant safety benefit. My guess is that it’s not enough ballast to self-right from a knockdown. And with a sealed, buoyant mast, won’t the risk of turtle be low even with the unballasted foil? Furthermore, righting a turtled Evo isn’t likely to be difficult like some of the bigger, wider sportboats.

Appreciate more info on all these issues as folks get experience with both dagger and minikeel.

This is why I just ordered a K1.   But I only weigh 165 lbs.

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18 hours ago, Amati said:

This is why I just ordered a K1.   But I only weigh 165 lbs.

Congratulations and thanks for playing

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4 hours ago, bibs said:

Congratulations and thanks for playing

The playing will begin soon!

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6 hours ago, Amati said:

The playing will begin soon!

The K1 is a keelboat.  Completely different animal.  Looks like a very safe platform to knock around on single-handed.  Have fun.  

As for me - tomorrow I’m going out on one of these dangerous Evo’s, affairs are in order and my buddy knows to destroy my phone and computer hard drive if I don’t return.  Pets go to my folks, the rest gets auctioned to pay for rum at my funeral.  

Wish me the best?

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1 minute ago, sushi said:

The K1 is a keelboat.  Completely different animal.  Looks like a very safe platform to knock around on single-handed.  Have fun.  

As for me - tomorrow I’m going out on one of these dangerous Evo’s, affairs are in order and my buddy knows to destroy my phone and computer hard drive if I don’t return.  Pets go to my folks, the rest gets auctioned to pay for rum at my funeral.  

Wish me the best?

:lol:

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