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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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Zach

Anyone used Kiwigrip and removed it?

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Hi Guys,

I'm curious if kiwigrip is something that clogs sandpaper, or what the general level of aggression you have about removing it.

Thanks,

Zach

 

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4 hours ago, Zach said:

Hi Guys,

I'm curious if kiwigrip is something that clogs sandpaper, or what the general level of aggression you have about removing it.

Thanks,

Zach

 

Well my general rule of thumb, is that if it goes on easy, it'll be a bitch to take off...   I would think heat gun and paint scraper with rounded corners would be the first try...

and just found this on their faq's

 

Quote

To remove KiwiGrip it is normal to grind it away, make repairs and then re-coat to patch. The nice thing about KiwiGrip is that patching can look very good because of the rough texture, so repairs can be almost undetectable.

Unfortunately, KiwiGrip isn’t easy to remove — it will need to be physically ground away if there are large areas to remove (as would most coatings of this type).

Since it is a thermoplastic material, it will soften with heat. You can try heating it with a heat gun for paint stripping, and scraping with a putty knife.

 

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It seems to me that a lot of KiwiGrip will have been applied to the remains of the original non-skid finish and getting it out of the nooks and crannies could be interesting.

Why do you want to remove it and from what ?

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I haven't used it yet...

Gist is, I ground the nonskid off an 80 foot trawler once that was blasting sand in rubber mastic paint...  Basically tough enough stuff that it ripped the grit off sandpaper.

Trying not to pick an easy way that ends up being a very large pain in the butt at a later date!

 

 

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It comes off easily enough with a grinder and an 80 grit disc, as long as you’re ok with grazing the surface beneath a little. More easily than taking down the nonskid pattern in fiberglass, which is also not exactly precision work.

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Yes I used it, and no I haven't removed it, but I wish I could.

Actually, I can't say that I haven't removed it... at least not intentionally.

Drop anything heavier than your car keys on it and it pops right off.

Total crap.

Sorry Dreade, but anything that easy to put on just plain doesn't last.

Get yourself a good quality 2-part LPU, mix in some non-skid, and you'll never paint your boat again

 

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I'd think that chemical paint removers would work.

It might not be as fast as grinding, but it'd do less damage to the substrate, which would be important if you're going to a thin coating  like the LPU's.

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13 hours ago, thereefgeek said:

Yes I used it, and no I haven't removed it, but I wish I could.

Actually, I can't say that I haven't removed it... at least not intentionally.

Drop anything heavier than your car keys on it and it pops right off.

Total crap.

Sorry Dreade, but anything that easy to put on just plain doesn't last.

Get yourself a good quality 2-part LPU, mix in some non-skid, and you'll never paint your boat again

 

TRGeek-

I have it on my boat and am still impressed with the durability. Surface prep has been the key - areas we did a poor job of prep (abrading the existing surface and cleaning thoroughly) are areas that have flaked off - like around a small piece of trim or something. But otherwise, it has held up very well so far after 20 months and we are on the boat 2-3 times per week.

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I'm pissed off with Kiwigrip and my boatyard. My foredeck guy was slipping and sliding around on the 20 year old non-skid, so I decided to re-do and picked Kiwigrip. I asked the yard to put it on for me because I did not want to deal with sanding and prep.

18 months later it looked like crap because every dropped winch takes a divot. You can also see that the yard didn't bother sanding it at all because the old finish is clearly visible and unscratched in the locations where the Kiwi Grip peeled off. I can't decide whether to re-do the Kiwigrip over the gaps, or strip it off and start again.

Shitty product applied by amateurs - who also managed to splatter the stuff on my varnished toe rails, pushpit and traveller.

 

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OK, so I'm looking at a non-skid redo.  Is Kiwi really bad?  The yard I keep my boat at has stop applying it.  Not a good sign. I plan on DIY so I initially liked the idea of using it.  But I've heard some horror stories.  I really don't want a 60 grit grinding wheel-like finish so what's the real deal from people who've gone with Kiwi Grip?  Very interested...

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17 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

I'm pissed off with Kiwigrip and my boatyard. My foredeck guy was slipping and sliding around on the 20 year old non-skid, so I decided to re-do and picked Kiwigrip. I asked the yard to put it on for me because I did not want to deal with sanding and prep.

18 months later it looked like crap because every dropped winch takes a divot. You can also see that the yard didn't bother sanding it at all because the old finish is clearly visible and unscratched in the locations where the Kiwi Grip peeled off. I can't decide whether to re-do the Kiwigrip over the gaps, or strip it off and start again.

Shitty product applied by amateurs - who also managed to splatter the stuff on my varnished toe rails, pushpit and traveller.

 

just how?

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18 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

I'm pissed off with Kiwigrip and my boatyard. My foredeck guy was slipping and sliding around on the 20 year old non-skid, so I decided to re-do and picked Kiwigrip. I asked the yard to put it on for me because I did not want to deal with sanding and prep.

18 months later it looked like crap because every dropped winch takes a divot. You can also see that the yard didn't bother sanding it at all because the old finish is clearly visible and unscratched in the locations where the Kiwi Grip peeled off. I can't decide whether to re-do the Kiwigrip over the gaps, or strip it off and start again.

Shitty product applied by amateurs - who also managed to splatter the stuff on my varnished toe rails, pushpit and traveller.

 

I have no experience with Kiwigrip but it sure sounds like a shitty prep job. I wouldn't blame any paint for a bad prep. 

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Never used it but I've been on boats done with it. Didn't see any signs of it flaking or peeling but it had a lot of texture - much more than I like. I understand that is controllable by the type of roller you use.

I think the described problems sound like bad prep, not bad product.

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used and liked it... seemed quite durable for the couple of years I had the boat after applying. how aggressive the non skid will be is quite controllable. I should say I applied it indoors, not sure if doing it outside changes the outcome.

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19 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

18 months later it looked like crap because every dropped winch takes a divot. You can also see that the yard didn't bother sanding it at all because the old finish is clearly visible and unscratched in the locations where the Kiwi Grip peeled off. I can't decide whether to re-do the Kiwigrip over the gaps, or strip it off and start again.

Shitty product applied by amateurs...

 

I prefer to bolt the winches to the boat. It protects the finish and keeps my mind from wondering where they might get off to on their own.

It is easy to repair dings in Kiwi Grip. That's one of it's charms. However, if it's peeling then you need to remove all the loose paint first. I've seen a couple of Kiwi Grip jobs that had peel problems. The worst was a charter cat that was painted by a professional paint shop who know what they are doing and have had many good results. However, as a rule, the stuff sticks very well. IME, Kiwi Grip is good paint. I've used it on my boats with good results. I've seen good results from pros and amateurs on projects simple to sublime. But, it's just a paint. It isn't going to stick to a contaminated surface. Its properties are a compromise that may not be desirable for every job. 

 

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I did my boat with it.  Came out well I think.   The prep work is much less since it will cover existing molded nonskid.  Of course you must clean and dry before applying, but anything will require that.

 

After a while, I had an adhesion issue with section I did on cockpit sole.  It would chip off with dropped sea-dog plastic winch handles.  I think the problem was in the prep.  I did the boat in sections over several days since I didn't have enough time to prep and apply to the whole boat with enough dry time afterward.  The cockpit sole, being shaded, didn't get dry enough.  After a year I redid it, rotating the boat in the slip to get more sun in the cockpit and working on a warmer day.  Not problem now about three years later.  I can still damage it by dropping something heavy and hard, like a large wrench, but that would damage gelcoat or paint too, and the Kiwi grip is very easy to repair.

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^^ OK, I'll bite, what makes it better?  Is it available in the US?  I'm past the point of being a guinea pig for any new product.  Kiwi Grip has at least some years in actual use.  Tell me why the GripeLast is better.

Oh, and if you're affiliated with them, buy an ad!

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I'm at 4 years on the cockpit Kiwi Grip and it shows no signs of flaking. I did have a bit of spatter from the roller, but citrus-based stripper took care of that.

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18 hours ago, DrewR said:

^^ OK, I'll bite, what makes it better?  Is it available in the US?  I'm past the point of being a guinea pig for any new product.  Kiwi Grip has at least some years in actual use.  Tell me why the GripeLast is better.

Oh, and if you're affiliated with them, buy an ad!

I'm affiliated with both and I don't ship out of Spain, so don't worry. The difference is basically that Gripelast is more resistant to chemicals (if you spill some fuel for example) and it's more flexible (feels a bit "softer"), so dropping stuff on it wont break it.

Both are waterbased but Kiwigrip is acrylic and Gripelast is polyurethane. Both are great products.

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Another problem with Kiwigrip is bubbles. They form when it's stirred and also when rolled on, and they pop after it sits for a while creating little dirt traps. Has anyone tried "flashing" over Kiwigrip with a torch the way you do with epoxy to get rid of bubbles?

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On 16/11/2017 at 1:03 PM, Ishmael said:

I'm at 4 years on the cockpit Kiwi Grip and it shows no signs of flaking. I did have a bit of spatter from the roller, but citrus-based stripper took care of that.

OOps.  Yeah, what he said.

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On 11/15/2017 at 6:14 AM, DrewR said:

OK, so I'm looking at a non-skid redo.  Is Kiwi really bad?  The yard I keep my boat at has stop applying it.  Not a good sign. I plan on DIY so I initially liked the idea of using it.  But I've heard some horror stories.  I really don't want a 60 grit grinding wheel-like finish so what's the real deal from people who've gone with Kiwi Grip?  Very interested...

It's good for racers because it's easy on, and an easy repair or patch. But it also get's dirty, wears, and after a couple years it might want a fresh coat. But racers trash anything in 3-5 years, right?

Cruisers who never break stuff and hope to get 10-50 years out of a paint job might want to look into a 2k deck product.   

Application temperature is critical with Kiwi Grip. The longer it takes to dry the less sharp the texture becomes. And if there is any hint of silicone residue, ANY, that spot will flake immediately. 

It's great for what it is, and easy to apply and patch one-part non-skid. It's really a DIY product, pros want to do better. 

Pro Tip: Buy several pint cans and put your extra paint in them. Then you'll have paint to do patches with. Don't leave a quart of Kiwi Grip in a one gallon can for an extended time.  

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I agree with Spackler.  It seems to kinda get a grime to it. 

Nobody has dedicated deck shoes on our boat, and it seems to get dirty and then not want to scrub clean.  This annoys me.

But, it is amazingly easy to apply.  We have had it down 2 years and no chipping or flaking to speak of.

You can find some of the aforementioned  bubbles that have  popped though.

For DIY, I don't think anything else comes remotely close to being as "easy"

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