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Tell me about Cape Dory Typhoons

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I have always been smitten with Typhoons, thinking them the prettiest boat I have ever seen. The only car wreck I was ever in, was when I was backing up for a better look at a Typhoon. There is one for sale nearby, so here's the question: what are they like to sail? We race our boats, and the Typhoon will never be fast, but what's she like on the water?

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When we first moved to Virginia 35 years ago we bought a Typhoon because we had a 7yo who loved to sail and wanted to explore, but we were low on money and couldn't afford a cruiser/racer. We'd sail her everywhere in any kind of wind - it's a full keel lead sled so she was safe in any conditions and the <3' draft allowed us to slip into shallow creeks to anchor and spend the night. The v-berth and porta potti, a one burner propane stove and an ice chest allowed my daughter and I to do 3-4 day cruises, including going down the intercoastal waterway to the Albemarle. She wasn't terribly fast, but after we set her up with a spinnaker, she could do reasonably well for a mini cruiser.downwind. It's a fun boat and sails sweetly. The hull is prone to blister and the deck can get soft, so take a good look when shopping.

Cheers, Greg

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There is one on my dock, purchased from Lake Erie.    It’s overkill on my home puddle and reportedly hard to trailer launch, but makes a stable daysailor for an older guy and his dad.  It seems to handle the short tacking and lee shore of reservoir sailing well, even when he is alone and skips the jib.  I’ve admired it many a summer evening.   

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I can't comment on the Typhoon specifically. As a early teen I raced a couple times on a full keel Alberg designed SouthCoast 23 in MORC. Similar type design. It was slow, but we rated ridiculously low, so did fairly well. Boat was as responsive  as could be expected, and sailed reasonably well. I don't see anything wrong with a Typhoon, as long as you're not expecting it to be real fast. It'll give enjoyment on the water, and you'll get where you're going, eventually. Well-built. I'd take a Typhoon over a lot of modern designs.

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No question they're elegant in a 'mini' sort of way.  But I"d go for a fiberglass catboat  (Marshall or Herreshoff America 18'ers).  More room, shallower draft (board up), same length, longer lwl, faster....

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I sailed on a teacher acquintence's Ty long ago. I was an Ensign owner and figured it was a "small" Ensign. Very nice, perfectly respectable, solid rig as I recall. Snug. It was moored so do not know about dry sailing one. 

I used to sail the Ensign alone in high winds. Might be a bit tricky in the smaller boat, but what the hey? if you are looking to day-sail fast, Fox's Flying Fifteen seems better suited, maybe a 17-18 foot cat rigged Wylie is better choice for trailering, if you can find one. Rare to find one.

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My thouhts on Ty wase thet our welle bilte/mabey heavey, a welle behaved yahte, youlle enjoye it.                          :)

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Design is classic and will serve you well.   Just take your time buying and look at more than a couple.   Not a lot can go wrong, but POS will mar anyone's experience with any boat.   I am sure there is one out there that has been pampered, priced right for the right home and is waiting for you.

Good luck.

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Buy the boat. You will enjoy yourself.

No need for a catboat if you're looking for a sloop rig. I had a Herreshoff America that sailed so poorly I cut the cabin top and centerboard trunk out and made it into a cocktail launch. The Marshall Sanderling sails much better than the Herreshoff btw...

 

IMG_6332.JPG

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We sailed a Typhoon for about six years on Biscayne Bay in the 1970s, racing in a handicap fleet, daysailing, and weekending. We really enjoyed it.

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Sail69, Sailforbeer (I do it with brew) and Bull City (always wanted to move there out west, best of most worlds) All +1...trailer sailing?

Boat pictured is stunning. Dry-sailed? If so, rig time.

What I like about the Wylie cat -  easy trailered keeler, but needed a cuddy!

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I used to build Typhoons and have sailed them.  Great little boats.  Look for cracks around the cabin top where it joins the deck and soft spots on the deck.

The older ones did not have the post inside from the mast plate and are more prone to cracking.  Knees and the post were added sometime during production and help out with the mast compressing the cabin house and cracking. The plywood used as backing plates was shit. The hulls are solid glass and are like tanks.  I've heard of some deck to hull leaks and it doesn't surprise me as when I worked there the deck was set on a resin bog and then thru bolted to the hull. 

They really are great boats.

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Drew, do not have Ty but that is very interesting info.

Seems boat I crewed on was early model. Was on Minnetonka, west of Mpls.

Your comment reminds...I recall some minor complaints from owner re some deck problems with fasteners, but that Cape Dory boat was a rock.

Seems the hulls were so solid you had to use a nail to penetrate, like with the Ensigns. Appreciate builder viewpoints like with Gouv...insight.

Yes; very proper yachts, indeed!

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We had one of the pre-Cape Dory Typhoons, built by Naugus Fiberglass in Salem.  Same boat, sans traveler and porthole.

It's a "small big boat" rather than a "big small boat", so a bit heavy, and being an Alberg, not real quick but real seaworthy, with some initial tenderness before she stiffens up at about 15 degrees heel.   Hobbyhorses in a head sea with that short waterline, and turns on a dime.

User-friendly, nice-handling, pleasing to the traditional eye, and generally bulletproof.

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Great little boats.  Had one for a couple of years in the early 80's and cruised around St. Johns River, up to Cumberland and down to St. Augustine in the ocean.  Comfortable and easy to sail, not a whole lot of room below.  Couldn't really turn over in the 1/4 berths but the v-berth was adequate.  Mine was painted red, nice to look at.

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     I have always had a thing for the Typhoon but as I started to write this it occurred to me that it was because of a certain owner of one. In our liveaboard anchorage in the VI, there was a well endowed young lady who had bought a Typhoon and actually lived aboard! I guess that storage on a such a small vessel was limited and she rarely wore any clothing while on the boat. That Typhoon had to be the most watched boat in the harbor.

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we have LOTS of them here on the middle peninsula.

Most the old bucks who have to give up big boats due to age/heath end up with one of these in front of their house.

Several of the "youngins" have one in addition to their monohulls.

My understanding is there are ~ 70 on the lower Chesapeake.

 

A Thursday afternoon on the Piankitank will find a dozen neighbors dicing it up.

FBYC in Deltaville has half a dozen dry sailed and I know they are looking for a couple more to get another class racing at the same time the Flying Scots are competing.

 

Have raced on one a couple of times.

Their saying "The worlds smallest yacht" certainly fits.

With the keel, it sails just like a big monohull, only scaled down.

small kite but you are likely only having 2 crew.

When the brightwork is done, they are truly classics.

You are not going to plane, but you are not going to freak out a newbie with a capsize either.

I understand there are 2 models.  One with a cuddy and one without.

The cuddy model weighs more so it is at a disadvantage. But it is self bailing which is a plus if you intend to leave it in the water.

 

Likely will be buying one myself in 2 years when I retire.

A morning round of golf, a couple games of skeet and an afternoon sailboat race = What retirement is all about..

 

Neighbor repairs and then resells them to keep the fleet alive (low hum in the house late at night was driving me crazy until I found out he was grinding keels after midnight..).

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Brought back memories of those days, "mannered" racing and way fun...beer and water balloons...and...the vid prompted me to look at vid of some FF 15s both keelers but FF15...way different. Thanks, loved it! Always had a weakness for perching on windward (low) side...even in the heavy pressure. Rushhhhh!

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It is a sure footed little keelboat, not fast but stable, responsive but not nervous, with a simple rig.  Pleasant to sail.   I had my first lessons on one in Buzzard's Bay. I wouldn't turn down a ride in one today...

 

 

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There were 2 models, the regular Ty and the Ty Daysailer.  The Daysailer was an 'open' boat and had an entirely different deck and cockpit and did not have a self bailing cockpit. It was filled with expanding 2 part foam from the same supplier as Boston Whaler. It had a liner that created gap the foam was filled in.  These boats are very nice.  Teak seats (the latest ones used Angelique as a substitute).  There were a few of the Daysailers behind the building in Tauton MA that had a distorted hull shape, the story I was told was they were overfilled with the expanding foam and were either warranty swaps or ones that never made it to the dealers.

I've only seen one Daysailer in all the years since and I still live in the area they were made. Nice boats tho.

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I've owned two typhoons....not fast but stays on its feet....I was in a regatta in august...second day in the winds were 20+....all day...I never rounded up once...they hold a good line but you will get wet.....nothing  down below....weak points....cabin top can compress...I added a compression post to the most recent one that raised the top 1.5 inches....rudder can come loose from the post...easy fix...fiberglass around post and rudder...solid as a rock....cheap maintenance a big plus....if you just wanna go sailing...these are good boats...I liked the typhoon better than my cd 22 that I owned for 8 yrs....

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Couple of other things.....prices range from 2-20k depending on what it is....the last one I paid 5500 for it and sold it for 7k....things you can do:...get rid of the ugly blue decks by applying interlux interdeck beige paint....the boat looks amazingly better....strip and redo the teak.....I put cdi roller furling on ....I never liked lifelines so I only bought ones without lifelines....get one with a nice hull not all banged up and nice teak that is not damaged....the rest can be fixed easily....if you want a picture or two email me....the people that bought mine love that boat....

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40 minutes ago, shavdog said:

I've owned two typhoons....not fast but stays on its feet....I was in a regatta in august...second day in the winds were 20+....all day...I never rounded up once...they hold a good line but you will get wet.....nothing  down below....weak points....cabin top can compress...I added a compression post to the most recent one that raised the top 1.5 inches....rudder can come loose from the post...easy fix...fiberglass around post and rudder...solid as a rock....cheap maintenance a big plus....if you just wanna go sailing...these are good boats...I liked the typhoon better than my cd 22 that I owned for 8 yrs....

Dig...its a boat...its a good boat. And, I like low, get wet all the time. Luv it.

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One last thing....the trailer.....this last one had a 2005 triad  single axle trailer which was nice...my other one had a nice older trailer with rollers....hard to work on the bottom...some have no trailer and others have trailers that aren't roadable....like tires and bearings....that's an important part of the typhoon purchase...only other thing would be how old are the sails??

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Keelers are always PIA with posts...have to move or lift hull to sand and paint, at least I did. But, always a way. Interesting...sails...shape...etc. Makes me think of days past with Ensign and the pads...I was lucky, were adjustable, so I could drop one (carefully) while others held hull, with 2x4 insurance.

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Phrf of 290 

Now THAT is slow

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17 hours ago, AJ Oliver said:

Phrf of 290 

Now THAT is slow

"Speed" as a sensation is relative...as VMG different. One thing to sail, another to get somewhere...sans helmet need!

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On 11/14/2017 at 7:14 AM, Sail4beer said:

Buy the boat. You will enjoy yourself.

No need for a catboat if you're looking for a sloop rig. I had a Herreshoff America that sailed so poorly I cut the cabin top and centerboard trunk out and made it into a cocktail launch. The Marshall Sanderling sails much better than the Herreshoff btw...

 

IMG_6332.JPG

 

skip the typhoon, it sails like a pig,  if you can find an Ensign or a Corinthian 19, both sail a hundred times better and all by the same designer..

 

the mast is too short, not enough Main to get her moving.. they dumped all sorts of brass gear on her to make her pretty..  I'd like to get a pair of the brass whinch stands and convert them to cupholders on my boat..

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Do not forget to look at a 110...or even a Wylie 17, you can find one, and by all means an Ensign if avail with teak deck etc and good cuddy doors...but

the Typhoon is a fine boat and CD sold a few of them.....

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3 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

skip the typhoon, it sails like a pig (which is why almost 2,000 were built & sold),  if you can find an Ensign or a Corinthian 19, both sail a hundred times better and all by the same designer..

 

the mast is too short, not enough Main to get her moving.. they dumped all sorts of brass (bronze) gear on her to make her pretty..  I'd like to get a pair of the brass whinch stands and convert them to cupholders on my boat..

FIFY

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On 5/15/2018 at 4:02 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

that's because they put lipstick on it...

Touché.

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Me love lipstick...love to eat it.

There are "proper yachts" and there are not! Are you proper? 

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