mikke60

Keel

Recommended Posts

My boat hit the beach in the last New England storm. Most of the damage is confined to the keel. I have a 74 Pearson  10M, and the keel has a fiberglass tail attached to the lead via 3- 3/8" bolts. They were only imbedded 2" into the lead however, and the glassed in.

My biggest concern now is resetting the bolts in the lead. I am thinking about over sizing the holes in the lead and using skis epoxy to refasten.

Any feedback would be appreciated 

thanks,mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have the insurance company pay a professional to do the job:

1. There will be somebody to sue if the repair fails

2. Your insurance company will be on your side

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I wanted to people to do my work for me, I would have no need for this websitE.

and why is suing someone always the answer!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mikke60 said:

If I wanted to people to do my work for me, I would have no need for this websitE.

and why is suing someone always the answer!!!

Mikke, it's important to know what you should or shouldn't try to do yourself. I don't think Gouv meant that "suing someone always the answer," rather he meant that if something is beyond your own capabilities (and there is nothing wrong with acknowledging that) and you pay a professional to do it, you should expect professional results. I don't see anything wrong with that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you explain the construction better or provide a picture? What I got out of that description is there is a fiberglass fairing on the bottom of the lead attached with a few small bolts. In that case, loosing the whole piece of fiberglass is not a safety issue. Resettting the bolts in an oversized hole with some thickened epoxy would work fine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used during as an extreme. If you fix it yourself theninsurance company may not opt to cover it.

and

if it fails, you are totally on your own. 

 

If you think you can donit right... fine

oh yeah... if you ever sell it and it fails???? 

I

 

merely asking you whether you have considered the ramifications of fixing it yourself 

I fox my own stuff all the time . I wire new outlets and entire buildings... no licenses...

i get it

just making certain you are aware of the risks 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gouv's original reply makes a lot of sense if it is damage that would be covered by insurance or someone else.

For general R&M work, then you can definitely DIY, most of us here do - subject to the caveats Gouv mentions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe i should mention, no insurance ,other than required liability. luckily they did pay for the removal of boat off the beach.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

^^^ Bit of thread drift but other than 3rd party liability I have always self insured. If current or any future boat of mine sunk I am still ahead financially with what I have saved. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can provide an update. I purchased the boat from the original poster in March. 

I decided to handle the beach rash on the topsides and one deeper gouge just below the waterline. 

I hired a fiberglass guy to repair the keel. He used thickened epoxy and glass to attach the piece to the keel, faired it beautifully and the boat is now sitting on my mooring. 

It was surprisingly affordable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now