cpt_757

Re-Cut head sail

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I have an extra Genoa which is 150%.  I’d rather have smaller maybe 130% or less.

is it a good idea to re-cutting to make smaller one?  How is the cost to do that kind of job?

Thnk you in advance!

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I would take it to a sailmaker, who can assess the condition of the sail, what it will take to recut it, (assuming it's condition warrants it), and can quote you a price.  As the prior post points out - it is pointless to ask such a question on a website.

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Judging by your handle, I’m guessing you have something to do with the aviation industry.  Now, say you had a spare 757 wing and wanted to put it on a 737.  What part of the wing would you cut out?  Would you take it out of the leading edge, the middle, or the trailing edge?  What’s going to happen to the shape of the wing?  What’s going to happen to the Lift vs Drag?  

What material and cut is the sail.  A lot of string sails are loadpath.  They don’t like being loaded in areas they weren’t designed and built for. 

For a Dacron 150% being cut down to a ~125%, I would look at taking the area out of the Luff.  This would take out a lot of the broadseaming.  Some of the entry shape could be preserved by cutting a fuller luff curve.   

You’re looking at at least $500.

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Making the sail smaller is easy. Making it perform like a smaller sail is hard. The cloth weight and cut of your 150 won’t easily convert to a usable 130. 

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3 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

Making the sail smaller is easy. Making it perform like a smaller sail is hard. The cloth weight and cut of your 150 won’t easily convert to a usable 130. 

That's a bold claim to make without knowing the cloth weight and cut of his 150.

 

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4 hours ago, silent bob said:

Judging by your handle, I’m guessing you have something to do with the aviation industry.  Now, say you had a spare 757 wing and wanted to put it on a 737.  What part of the wing would you cut out?  Would you take it out of the leading edge, the middle, or the trailing edge?  What’s going to happen to the shape of the wing?  What’s going to happen to the Lift vs Drag?  

What material and cut is the sail.  A lot of string sails are loadpath.  They don’t like being loaded in areas they weren’t designed and built for. 

For a Dacron 150% being cut down to a ~125%, I would look at taking the area out of the Luff.  This would take out a lot of the broadseaming.  Some of the entry shape could be preserved by cutting a fuller luff curve.   

You’re looking at at least $500.

Thank you, understood what you are saying.

i know it just cut down a size involving some affects.

i wonder someone did before and how it came out.

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1 hour ago, stinky said:

That's a bold claim to make without knowing the cloth weight and cut of his 150.

 

Given the amount of data he supplied was essentially nil, it’s as absurd as trying to recommend recutting the sail. 

If one wants a smaller light weight sail, then cutting it down is easy. 

If one wants a small sail for stronger winds, then the cloth and cut matter. 

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On 11/26/2017 at 3:46 PM, cpt_757 said:

i wonder someone did before and how it came out.

 Our first boat came with a 150%, which was not the highest quality, good enough for day sailing (it was a 21'er) but not for the racing we got into later.  So had the sailmaker make a new suit of sails, (90, 155 and main.  The old main and jib I kept as a day sailing set, but after talking to the sailmaker had the 150 cut down to a blast reacher.  It was in good shape, the cloth was heavy enough, and well we were not going to use it to go to weather, as the boat did best with either the 155% or when the WS reached 15 or so the 90%.  It worked well, used it probably 3 or 4 times on distance races, not inshore.

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This does not answer your question but it offers a solution.

 

Bacon and Associates in Annapolis sells used sails. Sometimes the prices are fantabulous. 

Visit their website and see if they have what you want 

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I've done dozens of these, bigger and smaller, all types of sails. C-Cut Dacron, no problem, you can get a triangle with some shape. Cloth weight may not support use in 130% conditions if you plan on using it as a #2.  Any radial cut, it gets expensive to do. You spend the dough to have it done right which involves opening the joiners and moving the sections around to get the geometry right.  Age and condition of cloth critical to success.  You can also do the quick and dirty and hack off an edge. Save the bucks up from but the sail will be a shitter.  Total WOFTAM to even try on a string sail.  3Di may have more possibilities, but it wouldn't be cheap to do right.  

Bottom line is if all you need is a simple triangle and the fabric is in good shape. give it a go. Anyone that races with a sail like that will get spit out the back by any boat with a sail properly designed and built to fit. 

 

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Usually a sail is cut down on the leech. much cheaper. If there's a RF cover that's in good shape, then probably cut down the luff. This is assuming a cross-cut Dacron sail. A triradial or string sail can only be cut down a few inches. You can also cut down LP by raising the clew, which might be preferable in some cases and only means replacing RF cover on foot. 

Sail may not be worth cutting down. Suggestion above to have a sailmaker look at it is correct. There are many ways of cutting down a sail, with big variety in cost. General rule of thumb is a sail can be cut down about 10% with no adverse effects. A 150 to a 125-130 can probably be done.

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I just cut my Olson 29 old 145% genoa into a blast reacher yesterday. It's an old "string sail"  with the mylar gone at the perimeter of the clew so it looked like an old lady's string shopping bag but the body of the sail is OK. I raised the clew about 30 inches to cut away the bad material at the edge of the clew patch. Just cut out the clew patch and moved it up the leech then recut the foot to the relocated clew.  Probably only two hours of work in a loft but took about 4.5 hours in my living room.  Not ever going to be a racing sail but lets me have a high clewed genny for daysailing. 

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Got to hoist the recut genny today. It will be good on a reach too windy for a chute (thinking the "windy reach" phase of SHTP) and gives added life to a sail that was bound for the trash.

 

39096202961_76d78fd31f_b.jpg

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On 12/16/2017 at 2:11 PM, sailronin said:

Got to hoist the recut genny today. It will be good on a reach too windy for a chute (thinking the "windy reach" phase of SHTP) and gives added life to a sail that was bound for the trash.

 

39096202961_76d78fd31f_b.jpg

Thanks for the input.

looks good!

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Thank you.

It will do for a reacher and better than tossing it in the dumpster.

Good luck with your re-cut project

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You better get some 10cm wide PSA Aramid tape to apply along the foot. The cloth is totally on the bias and has no strength at all. And this isn't a string sail, it's a tri-radial.

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58 minutes ago, A3A said:

You better get some 10cm wide PSA Aramid tape to apply along the foot. The cloth is totally on the bias and has no strength at all. And this isn't a string sail, it's a tri-radial.

That's 4" for those metrically deficient!

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Correct a laminate tri-radial, not a cross cut with strings. Aft half of the foot is very much on the bias, fwd half is not so bad. I may just take some of the off cut cloth and make a warp aligned tape. That's what I did on the leech along from clew to 20cm above the patch. Will see how much it stretched as loading is pretty light on the foot while reaching.

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