duncan (the other one)

VOR Leg 4 Melbourne to Honkers

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 It’s obviously not the J0. That’s the sail they didn’t have last round and realized they were missing. Seems like a lot of talk of using it as well. 

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Update from Dee Caffari on Turn the Tide on Plastic:

Now we saw them, then we didn't, then we saw them, then we didn't. this was the story of the day with Vestas. 

Taking bearings then we lost them as they went five lower to power towards the line of the red boats. Looking ahead at the weather, we are confident we will see them all again pretty soon.

Next up today was crossing of a shallow area. To the north was a reef and to the south were shallows, but where we could sail. It just feels weird in the middle of an ocean we should see the depth contours change from 3km to 29 metres. It always makes you nervous when there is a reef really close just how well surveyed the area is.

Sadly in the conditions we had, we did not see a change in the colour of the water, we did not see an abundance of marine life and we did not see any more plastic free mermaids to wave at us.

The only increase in animal life we have seen are with the birds. There are lots of birds around and at night it feels as if we are under attack, with a group of about 7 birds circulating around the mainsail and these birds are noisy.

Dee and team TTTOP

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Taking no chances.

Leg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 5

Libby Greenhalgh double checks the navigation the old fashioned way on board Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag.

Photo by Konrad Frost/Volvo Ocean Race. 06 January, 2018.

Screen Shot 2018-01-07 at 2.47.33 AM.png

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13 minutes ago, dolphinmaster said:

As with all times, this is an even better time to go live, 4 boats within 3 miles 

Oh yes. The Experts had better deliver.

Cheers all. 

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11 hours ago, rogerfal said:

Yep have come across that in southern Chile - Difference between chart and GPS. The plot to the paper chart had us sitting on top of a glacier!

British navy have much to answer for :rolleyes:

The problem is not so much poor charting as some charts locally NOT drawn to the WGS84 Datum ( they were last properly surveyed WAY BEOFRE satellites were in the sky) and of course GPS is universally to that standard unless manually programmed. This datum difference was largely responsible for one of the Clipper boats piling onto an island in either Indonesia area or Philippines (I can't remember). They were, I understand) using the plotter (on WGS84)  while the paper charts had a warning printed that the datum as 1 mile out and they sailed straight onto the island. It is, at least partly, for this reason that most plotter and/or software have that "on your own head' warning when you switch them on.

For anyone interested in the history of charting by the ROYAL NAVY (it's never properly called the 'British Navy') there is an excellent autobiography of Rear Admiral G.S. Ritchie called "No Day Too Long". When he joined the Admiralty Hydrography Department it was all done by triangulation and manual sights (and often still with lead line). By the time he retired as "The Hydrographer of the Royal Navy" (and went on to spend 10 years as Chairman of the Directing Committee of the International Hydrographic Bureau) it was all GPS.

His son in law, who also retired as an RN '4 ringer' was one of my best sailing buddies back in the UK.

The book is an excellent read and Admiral Ritchie was a wonderful and gracious man who I am honoured to have met on several occasions as he lived virtually down the road from my parents - sadly many years ago now.

As an interesting aside he was the hydrographer on board HMS Challenger when she recorded the depth of the deepest ocean, Challenger Deep named for the ship that discovered it.

Anyway, at least Witty managed to avoid a 'Vestas Moment'.

SS

 

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Just now, southerncross said:

Great story SS. 

methode-times-prodmigration-web-bin-e76a1135-afe0-351b-8659-43c2052cdd41.jpg

Brilliant Southern and thanks (really) for the picture. He was a wonderful man and OBVIOUSLY very good at his job.

SS

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3 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

And so starts the Accordion effect.

We're going to see some lead changes in the next several days.

I very much hope the yellow boat can find an elastic band to the leading boat and gets back into the mix. 

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2 minutes ago, popo said:

What is happening to brunel, heading east like that ?

Looking for a cloud no doubt.

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3 hours ago, southerncross said:

Taking no chances.

Leg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 5

Libby Greenhalgh double checks the navigation the old fashioned way on board Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag.

Photo by Konrad Frost/Volvo Ocean Race. 06 January, 2018.

Screen Shot 2018-01-07 at 2.47.33 AM.png

Sorry to say, but what a pathetic picture this is. (yes, I am shouting)

Are they trying to say "you see, we checked everything, even all those paper charts that were recently corrected too !"

Or "we zoomed in all the way and never saw that reef, and then Wharro said he brought along his paper charts just in case."

Really, there is zero justification for this utterly ridiculous fuck up.

I must admit that there does not seem to be any satellite imagary of this Recif Nereus, not on Google Earth, Bing or Nasa.

But if you google "recif nereus" then the 2nd result says:

NP15 Australia Pilot Vol III - [PDF Document] - Vdocuments

Récif Nereus 2.203 1 Récif Nereus (Nereus Reef) (20°05′S 160°25′E) lies near the NW end of Banc du Lansdowne. Breakers marking the reef are unlikely to be seen from far off, even in good light. A 12 m patch, with a reported 18 m patch about 2 miles SW of it, lies 5 miles WNW of the NW end of the reef; these are the ...

And that position is spot on in the middle of the reef on my CM93 raster chart, and on my Navionics vector chart!

I am speechless...      almost...       amateurs!

Edited by Fiji Bitter
Added amateurs
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12 minutes ago, popo said:

What is happening to brunel, heading east like that ?

TWS: 5.2 Knots, TWD: 211°

Pretty much says it all... probably behind a cloud or something.

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3 hours ago, southerncross said:

Taking no chances.

Leg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 5

Libby Greenhalgh double checks the navigation the old fashioned way on board Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag.

Photo by Konrad Frost/Volvo Ocean Race. 06 January, 2018.

Screen Shot 2018-01-07 at 2.47.33 AM.png

 

Glad to see cross referencing. What racing navigators, particularly those that sail well surveyed areas in European waters, can learn from cruisers is so much of Pacific is poorly surveyed depending on chart data source. I'd guess data as recent as 10-15 years ago might have come from Captn Cook's surveys himself on obscure reefs. 

Problem is you never know how accurate they are until you have reference points and exp - and if there's no marker on the reef, how do you REALLY know?

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It's simple. Don't pass a charted reef closer than about 5 miles at night, and no closer than 2 miles during good daylight conditions. That gives you a fighting chance.

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Pretty cool video of drone operation on board, i think. Would like to see more of how they do it.

 

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Dee about to be the "Beast from the East" as she does the end around move.  Model is highly variable, of course, but I like her chances.  Looks like Bouwe does too.

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22 minutes ago, Miffy said:

 

Glad to see cross referencing. What racing navigators, particularly those that sail well surveyed areas in European waters, can learn from cruisers is so much of Pacific is poorly surveyed depending on chart data source. I'd guess data as recent as 10-15 years ago might have come from Captn Cook's surveys himself on obscure reefs. 

Problem is you never know how accurate they are until you have reference points and exp - and if there's no marker on the reef, how do you REALLY know?

If different chart data give the same result, and that corresponds with the official Australian pilot, then I would confidently pass that reef at 5 nm at night (like Brunel did during daylight, but looking into the afternoon sun). If there was a satellite overlay much much closer then that, if somehow needed, like sailing shy with a spi.

Most reefs now come up on the satellite imagery, and is available free if you make an effort, or is included in the more expensive charting programs. Solves all your Captain Cook problems.

PS. I wrote 5 nm before I saw Zonkers post: "It's simple. Don't pass a charted reef closer than about 5 miles at night, and no closer than 2 miles during good daylight conditions. That gives you a fighting chance." 

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1 hour ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Sorry to say, but what a pathetic picture this is. (yes, I am shouting)

Are they trying to say "you see, we checked everything, even all those paper charts that were recently corrected too !"

Or "we zoomed in all the way and never saw that reef, and then Wharro said he brought along his paper charts just in case."

Really, there is zero justification for this utterly ridiculous fuck up.

I must admit that there does not seem to be any satellite imagary of this Recif Nereus, not on Google Earth, Bing or Nasa.

But if you google "recif nereus" then the 2nd result says:

NP15 Australia Pilot Vol III - [PDF Document] - Vdocuments

Récif Nereus 2.203 1 Récif Nereus (Nereus Reef) (20°05′S 160°25′E) lies near the NW end of Banc du Lansdowne. Breakers marking the reef are unlikely to be seen from far off, even in good light. A 12 m patch, with a reported 18 m patch about 2 miles SW of it, lies 5 miles WNW of the NW end of the reef; these are the ...

And that position is spot on in the middle of the reef on my CM93 raster chart, and on my Navionics vector chart!

I am speechless...      almost...       amateurs!

WTF are you on about?
What is wrong with using all available tools to do the job?
 

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1 hour ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Sorry to say, but what a pathetic picture this is. (yes, I am shouting)

Are they trying to say "you see, we checked everything, even all those paper charts that were recently corrected too !"

Or "we zoomed in all the way and never saw that reef, and then Wharro said he brought along his paper charts just in case."

Really, there is zero justification for this utterly ridiculous fuck up.

I must admit that there does not seem to be any satellite imagary of this Recif Nereus, not on Google Earth, Bing or Nasa.

But if you google "recif nereus" then the 2nd result says:

NP15 Australia Pilot Vol III - [PDF Document] - Vdocuments

Récif Nereus 2.203 1 Récif Nereus (Nereus Reef) (20°05′S 160°25′E) lies near the NW end of Banc du Lansdowne. Breakers marking the reef are unlikely to be seen from far off, even in good light. A 12 m patch, with a reported 18 m patch about 2 miles SW of it, lies 5 miles WNW of the NW end of the reef; these are the ...

And that position is spot on in the middle of the reef on my CM93 raster chart, and on my Navionics vector chart!

I am speechless...      almost...       amateurs!

http://www.reefbase.org/global_database/default.aspx?section=r1&region=0&country=nc

 

Between the Chesterfield Plateau and Grande Terre is the wide Landsdowne Bank, which is mostly sandy and 70-80 meters in depth, but includes the small Nereus Reef in the north. To the southeast of this area the Fairway Reef also comes close to the surface and dries at low tide. A number of maps show a large island to the northwest of Nereus Reef which does not actually exist: Île de Sable. However, there may be shallow banks and submerged reefs in this region, which remains poorly charted.

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2 minutes ago, ModernViking said:

WTF are you on about?
What is wrong with using all available tools to do the job?
 

Nothing wrong with that if you don't fuck up big time!    Get it?

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1 minute ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Nothing wrong with that if you don't fuck up big time!    Get it?

Not really - but it is morning here, and I haven't had  my coffee yet.
Might be the problem     -_-

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I'm surprised no sails have been damaged by drones. When they fly them ahead of the boat I'm always a bit worried. 

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1 minute ago, SCANAS said:

I'm surprised no sails have been damaged by drones. When they fly them ahead of the boat I'm always a bit worried. 

I'm waiting for the video of a drone being unpicked off a bowsprit...

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3 minutes ago, ModernViking said:

Not really - but it is morning here, and I haven't had  my coffee yet.
Might be the problem     -_-

Understand, but I suppose you did see Scally's morning glory, did you?  Good mooorning!
image.jpeg.5aa41d4c7a8e4f39fc288a5af761bd0b.jpegImage result for good moooorning

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7 minutes ago, audiopixie said:

I'm waiting for the video of a drone being unpicked off a bowsprit...

For the next VOR, when there will be no more OBR's, they will use the next generation drones, and they will land right in their storage/charging bin inside the boat. I bet...

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Just now, Fiji Bitter said:

For the next VOR, when there will be no more OBR's, they will use the next generation drones, and they will land right in their storage/charging bin inside the boat. I bet...

remote controlled from a bunker in alicante?

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1 minute ago, audiopixie said:

remote controlled from a bunker in alicante?

Eh? By then that bunker will have imploded under the deafening sound of the CEO's !

No, all the crew will only be to eager to play with the toy, they will have 1 each...

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48 minutes ago, duncan (the other one) said:

http://www.reefbase.org/global_database/default.aspx?section=r1&region=0&country=nc

 

Between the Chesterfield Plateau and Grande Terre is the wide Landsdowne Bank, which is mostly sandy and 70-80 meters in depth, but includes the small Nereus Reef in the north. To the southeast of this area the Fairway Reef also comes close to the surface and dries at low tide. A number of maps show a large island to the northwest of Nereus Reef which does not actually exist: Île de Sable. However, there may be shallow banks and submerged reefs in this region, which remains poorly charted.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Not to be confused with Great Sandy Island (Western Australia).
Sandy Island
Île de Sable
Sandy Island (Alleged Location) 2002-01-10, Landsat 7 ETM+.png
Landsat satellite image showing the island's supposed location.
 
Sandy Island
Sandy Island
Geography
Coordinates 17px-WMA_button2b.png19.22°S 159.93°ECoordinates: 17px-WMA_button2b.png19.22°S 159.93°E
Length 24 km (14.9 mi)
Width 5 km (3.1 mi)
Administration
France (New Caledonia)
Demographics
Population 0

Sandy Island (sometimes labelled in French Île de Sable, and in Spanish Isla Arenosa) is a non-existent island that was charted for over a century as being located near the French territory of New Caledoniabetween the Chesterfield Islandsand Nereus Reef in the eastern Coral Sea.[1] The island was included on many maps and nautical charts from as early as the late 19th century. It was removed from French hydrographic charts in 1974. The island gained wide media and public attention in November 2012 when the R/V Southern Surveyor, an Australian surveyor ship, passed through the area and "undiscovered" it. The island was quickly removed from many maps and data sets, including those of the National Geographic Societyand Google Maps.[2]

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49 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Understand, but I suppose you did see Scally's morning glory, did you?  Good mooorning!
image.jpeg.5aa41d4c7a8e4f39fc288a5af761bd0b.jpegImage result for good moooorning

Thank you very much. There is nothing like fresh dick and coffee in the morning... :wacko:

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13 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:
 

You do know they don't have internet access out there don't you?  Not saying they didn't make a cock up, just that it is a damn site easier when you have instant access to as much information as you want.

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5 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

there is an excellent autobiography of Rear Admiral G.S. Ritchie called "No Day Too Long

Better be good, ordered one from Scotland, McLaren books, there are not many around.

no-day-too-long-an-hydrographers-tale-ri

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8 minutes ago, Potter said:

You do know they don't have internet access out there don't you?  Not saying they didn't make a cock up, just that it is a damn site easier when you have instant access to as much information as you want.

Yes, I do know that. That's where a bit of planning comes in, preferable with a shore based navigator too.

Scally went through 2 navigators in 3 legs, and Libby came in at the last moment, that's where the problem lies.

Don't think Libby is to blame at all, that's not my point. Although, the Navionics and CM93 charts don't leave any doubt, and that makes me wonder what really happened. Hope that Libby will tell.

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32 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Yes, I do know that. That's where a bit of planning comes in, preferable with a shore based navigator too.

Scally went through 2 navigators in 3 legs, and Libby came in at the last moment, that's where the problem lies.

Don't think Libby is to blame at all, that's not my point. Although, the Navionics and CM93 charts don't leave any doubt, and that makes me wonder what really happened. Hope that Libby will tell.

I know what happened ... the navigator fucked up.  I feel for her but she fucked up.  Let's not try to convince ourselves otherwise.

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5 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

The problem is not so much poor charting as some charts locally NOT drawn to the WGS84 Datum ( they were last properly surveyed WAY BEFORE satellites were in the sky) and of course GPS is universally to that standard unless manually programmed.

 

It is certainly not just a chart datum problem. Both, Navionics and Cm93 charts each show different errors on the same chart, like 1/2 mile off in one place, and a mile in another, in a random way.

 Columbus, Captain Cook, Schouten /Lemaire, and not to forget the Chinese Navigator Zheng He from Shanghai, did an incredible job, but not nearly good enough for today's standards.

The science of satellite imagery has come a long way, and we are already seeing the results in better charts. Before long all the charts will be perfect, and we can navigate blindfolded on autopilot...

Google something like "science satellite imagery nautical charts", and you will be amazed what is involved and what they can see from space.

 

 

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2 hours ago, duncan (the other one) said:

http://www.reefbase.org/global_database/default.aspx?section=r1&region=0&country=nc

 

Between the Chesterfield Plateau and Grande Terre is the wide Landsdowne Bank, which is mostly sandy and 70-80 meters in depth, but includes the small Nereus Reef in the north. To the southeast of this area the Fairway Reef also comes close to the surface and dries at low tide. A number of maps show a large island to the northwest of Nereus Reef which does not actually exist: Île de Sable. However, there may be shallow banks and submerged reefs in this region, which remains poorly charted.

image.thumb.png.7230601f5fa8272d6514a91100a0488f.png

Found this SouthEast, would you sail here ? Rock symbol and dashed lines....

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9 hours ago, Roleur said:

 It’s obviously not the J0. That’s the sail they didn’t have last round and realized they were missing. Seems like a lot of talk of using it as well. 

ok - your vote?

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1 hour ago, LeoV said:

Found this SouthEast, would you sail here ? Rock symbol and dashed lines....

Amazing what you will find when you zoom in, who knew!

Anyway, I would not sail there, the blue area is supposed to be 0-20 m., and would stay may be 2 nm off.

No mention of it in the Pilot, other then that much of the area is uncharted. CM93 chart has got an exclamation mark in that area, which is probably about the current. The paper chart probably has a proper warning on it. Ouf, did I say paper?

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3 hours ago, LeoV said:

Better be good, ordered one from Scotland, McLaren books, there are not many around.

no-day-too-long-an-hydrographers-tale-ri

If you enjoy it as much as I did you will consider it money well spent. Cool to read about the development of charting by someone actually involved.

SS

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2 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

 

It is certainly not just a chart datum problem.

 

 

Did I say it was? However no matter how error free the cartographer efforts are, if the datum is different it would make no difference. As Clipper found out you are still going to hit the hard stuff.

I do understand what you mean though and agree there is a danger in trusting what someone else (the electronic chart makers) has copied from the original.

I do agree though Fiji, it is getting better, I remember when I was much younger in sailing that some of the fathom charts had parts on them that had been surveyed in the 1800's, no GPS, Decca was a record player and gramophone manufacturer and even when that came in they were the size of a small suitcase and needed special Decca overlay charts and the system would occasionally 'chain jump' in certain atmospheric conditions and not by an amount measured in feet either. 

God it's so easy these days (most of the time). :-)

SS

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25 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

God it's so easy these days (most of the time). :-)

SS

Indeed Shang, and then we are not even talking about the immensely improved weather forecasting.

Just before hitting the sack I remembered this little jewel by a visiting French programmer. It's  the Google Earth images plus the routes of Fiji, on-line as well as off-line apps. They even overlay on OpenCPN.

Try it here, it's pretty cool: http://cruisingfiji.blogspot.com/

It shows what reef navigation means, move over to the eastern islands, Vanua Balavu for instance, and you will see what I mean.

That way, with routes you can trust, you don't really need charts anymore, period...   :huh:

 

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1 hour ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Anyway, I would not sail there, the blue area is supposed to be 0-20 m., and would stay may be 2 nm off.

And you think that rock is really:

- on that spot or nearby (it could be miles off)

- exists at all

Dashed lines indicates:

no soundings there

unless you know when and how it was surveyed, you better stay way more then 2 nm off.

 

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1 hour ago, Fiji Bitter said:

That way, with routes you can trust, you don't really need charts anymore, period...   :huh:

 

Though we use electronic charts onboard locally and on deliveries to Alaska on computers and pads. I still use paper charts for reviewing and planning a route.

I also like keeping paper charts onboard, even if I have to bring my own - just in case they're needed.

The delivery here of two 58' purse seiners from Ballard, WA to Cordova, AK - both boats have four man crew - our crew rotating four hour wheel watches.

Keep about a minimum of 1/4 mile to a max of 1/2 mile separation between boats. The red navigation line is a previous reverse delivery to Ballard, WA.

Midnight to 0400hrs wheel watch - the computer doesn't look like that with the wavy line, that's just the way my phone recorded it.

0800-1200 hrs wheel watch

 

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6 hours ago, duncan (the other one) said:

http://www.reefbase.org/global_database/default.aspx?section=r1&region=0&country=nc

 

Between the Chesterfield Plateau and Grande Terre is the wide Landsdowne Bank, which is mostly sandy and 70-80 meters in depth, but includes the small Nereus Reef in the north. To the southeast of this area the Fairway Reef also comes close to the surface and dries at low tide. A number of maps show a large island to the northwest of Nereus Reef which does not actually exist: Île de Sable. However, there may be shallow banks and submerged reefs in this region, which remains poorly charted.

That’s it’s winter home.  Other times it’s here 

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I have been flat out like a lizard drinking this last week and with no interweb and the twins are just killing me plus some with their bad music...I've just surfaced....in two paragraphs can some kind soul please tell me what is happening? 

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Speaking of the reliability of charts don't forget this significant event.

Pacific Island nations urge world leaders to act as islands expected to sink

http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/pacific-island-nations-urge-world-leaders-to-act-as-islands-expected-to-sink/news-story/9416ac1726d1f8d02a1ae435924e364f

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8 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Sorry to say, but what a pathetic picture this is. (yes, I am shouting)

Good thing they didn't hit the reef.  You might have blown a gasket.

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30 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

I have been flat out like a lizard drinking this last week and with no interweb and the twins are just killing me plus some with their bad music...I've just surfaced....in two paragraphs can some kind soul please tell me what is happening? 

A big split with Mapfre and Vestas going inshore.  Brunel and Scally in the middle.  DF, TToP and Akzo East.

Mapfre and Vestas caught up a 40 mile deficit.  Scally almost hit a reef.  Playing the clouds now and about to hit the doldrums proper.

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Holy phuck! Just review the sites as well as pages here - it would take longer to write two paragraphs, that it would take to do a review.

The short of it, the fleet split coming up the Australian coast, with MAPFRE and Vestas committed to inshore, and Brunel taking the center between the split. Aboard Akzo Nic talked about catching a favorable current, which they hoped to extend on, I assume this was Dongfengs plan as well.

Winds went light inshore and a big hole in front of them, so MAPFRE and Vestas headed NE offshore and the whole went into the same mode.  Crossing the rumb line, MAPFRE and Alzo pulled a tactical move. jibed and consolidated their lead, with about a 40 mile lead on MAPFRE and Vestas. The fleet jibed about four times to the east of the rumb line. MAPFRE, Vestas and TTOP chose to stay a bit east and caught a predicted new wind out of the east, while Dongfeng and Akzo were to the west. Initially TTOP was between MAPFRE and Vestas, but they soon left TTOP behind, and caught up to the rear of the leaders in about the next 12+ hours. Akzo has been on Dongfeng's butt all along, as MAPFRE did in the last leg. It's been a tight group of the four leaders, with a seperation of less then four NMs six hours ago, and now about 8.5 NMs separation laterally from Akzo to Vestas, with Dongfeng still leading the charge.

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Light air stacking.

Leg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 06 on board AkzoNobel as the fleet enters the doldrums.

Photo by Sam Greenfield/Volvo Ocean Race. 07 January, 2018.

Screen Shot 2018-01-07 at 3.11.16 PM.png

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Forward, low and centered - the best way to go in the light stuff.

Forward to get the big ass out of the water - low and centered to keep a low centralized center of gravity to minimize hull movement.

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Just now, boomer said:

Forward and low - they best way to go in the light stuff.

Gets the arse out.

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Precisely - Forward - to get the big ass out of the water.

Low and centered - to get any excess moveable weight low and centered to minimize hull movement.

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A lot of discussion about sail trim and selection but equally (or more importantly) is reducing drag or wetted surface, and "hull trim".  

This is where the lead boats have figured out how to make their boats less sticky.

 

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On 1/5/2018 at 10:41 AM, samc99us said:

AKA they made a mistake with the underwater shape + rig setup/positioning design loop, so the teams compensated by running three headsails to generate the required lift. Everyone makes mistakes from time to time.

What a silly way to say 'underpowered'

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

Light air stacking.

Leg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 06 on board AkzoNobel as the fleet enters the doldrums.

Photo by Sam Greenfield/Volvo Ocean Race. 07 January, 2018.

Screen Shot 2018-01-07 at 3.11.16 PM.png

Not sure I would want that camera case (whatever) looming over my head while trying to rest.

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

A big split with Mapfre and Vestas going inshore.  Brunel and Scally in the middle.  DF, TToP and Akzo East.

Mapfre and Vestas caught up a 40 mile deficit.  Scally almost hit a reef.  Playing the clouds now and about to hit the doldrums proper.

Thanks for the very useful summary!

One more cliffs notes question that I don’t care to scroll through 13 pages to find the answer to:  what’s with the big wiggle/waggle in Brunel’s track?  T-storm or reef-dodging?

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2 minutes ago, dcbsheb said:

One more cliffs notes question that I don’t care to scroll through 13 pages to find the answer to:  what’s with the big wiggle/waggle in Brunel’s track?  T-storm or reef-dodging?

Big cloud.

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2 minutes ago, dcbsheb said:

Thanks for the very useful summary!

One more cliffs notes question that I don’t care to scroll through 13 pages to find the answer to:  what’s with the big wiggle/waggle in Brunel’s track?  T-storm or reef-dodging?

Drifting under a cloud. 

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5 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Really liking TTOP's positioning as the fleet approaches Makira. 

I do too. Will it be a winning move or just turds on plastic?

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4 minutes ago, Francis Vaughan said:

Big cloud.

 

4 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Drifting under a cloud. 

Thanks!

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25 minutes ago, Varan said:

I do too. Will it be a winning move or just turds on plastic?

We will see by 1300UTC. I think TToP still doesn't have the consistency and boat speed, but sure seems like Brian is teaching everyone, including Dee how to find speed. 

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22 minutes ago, Miffy said:

We will see by 1300UTC. I think TToP still doesn't have the consistency and boat speed, but sure seems like Brian is teaching everyone, including Dee how to find speed. 

Currently slowest and most headed :(

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Dang, was hoping the paint would stick to the dong

a3.jpg.e5bf4a82ec08709b9f95c76503f3cc1e.jpg

Dong sure could use a boat or two between them and Mapfre. Mapfre brings back old memories...

 

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Avoiding reefs. Hindsight always 20-20 but sure seems like keeping reef sandbank to port would have been easier/safer. Another problem is no one knows when it was last surveyed and sandbank systems shift. 

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1 hour ago, Miffy said:
Avoiding reefs. Hindsight always 20-20 but sure seems like keeping reef sandbank to port would have been easier/safer. Another problem is no one knows when it was last surveyed and sandbank systems shift. 

Keeping it to port means keeping it to lee. Call me old fashioned, but...

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1 hour ago, Varan said:

Currently slowest and most headed :(

Update looks good. If the weather holds up they'll be with the leaders by the next updte . 

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10 minutes ago, DFL1010 said:

Keeping it to port means keeping it to lee. Call me old fashioned, but...

It is risk you have to examine on a case by case basis. That reef system extended east to west and Scallywag had to sail 270 for a while to clear the entirety of it. Fairly narrow north to south. Exposure I'd say is greater doing what they ended up doing. Brunel stayed clear and kept it to port on a reach. These aren't old clipper merchants that can't hold a course. 

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