duncan (the other one)

VOR Leg 4 Melbourne to Honkers

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In re sails they never use. Dee said it was their A3 in the latest TToP vid re making a deck boom tent cover out of it. 

And they get to do this again! Hope there aren't substantial delays because Auckland stopover usually is the best one IMO. 

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5 minutes ago, ASP said:

JFC, enough with this ridiculous narration you're spinning up about the VO65 being made deliberately wet

A lot have him on ignore here for these kind of shit fight comments.  We try not to quote him.  

There's a whole other thread about the boats being wet and another about the 65's. But of course he knows that already.

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6 minutes ago, southerncross said:

A lot have him on ignore here for these kind of shit fight comments.  We try not to quote him.  

There's a whole other thread about the boats being wet and another about the 65's. But of course he knows that already.

This. 

Please don’t quote him. It just clogs up the threads. 

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3 hours ago, duncan (the other one) said:

now that's a glassout.. looks almost 3d rendered.

What's the bet someone will escape this millpond under a cloud and grab a break on the fleet ?

& Almost anybody's guess who :-(

SS

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Looks like Mapfre and Dong are putting their money in east. Brunel making the biggest gamble IMHO. Current GFS routing favors east.

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40 minutes ago, ASP said:

JFC, enough with this ridiculous narration you're spinning up about the VO65 being made deliberately wet. With the 70's it was up to each individual team and yet not one of them decided to go for a design that was more "crew friendly". They designed a boat they thought was fast, that's all they cared about, whether it was fast. 

It's not so much that they've been made deliberately wet, it's just that not enought effort has been put in to make them dryer and thus safer.   The open 60's used to be very wet boats, but the latest generation all has really good crew protection in the form of much larger coachroof overhangs - even with slide back covers and lookout bubbles.   It's not affected the spectacle of those boats at all, (as there is not much you can do to stop a boat travelling at 25+ knots from occasionally becoming a torpedo) it's just that you don't see as much water hosing the crew (and less reports of crew with broken bones as a result of waves washing them off their feet).

So yes it's easier to give protection on a boat that only takes 1 or 2 crew vs 8 to 10 crew, but still I think it would not do the sport any harm if the next generation had a bit better crew protection.

I think the sliding roof idea needs to be given some thought. For in port races and starts, when the full crew are up, the roof is slid forward and out of the way.  When only a partial crew is on deck, then the roof can be slid back to well protect the grinders and deflect waves away from the helm.   The helm is still going to get a hosing, but perhaps it will be mostly whitewater rather than green!

 

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Pretty sure Capey does not want to be there...he just got sucked left by being just off the back. Towill and Teapot looking like gunslingers with their hands on the trigger.

 

 

 

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Latest from skipper Dee Caffari on Turn the Tide on Plastic: 

With little to no wind for the whole day, it has been frustrating. Even more problematic is the longer it takes us to clear this area the worse it gets.

So we have been trying to move our boat along in wind strengths from 1 knot to 3 knots of wind for the day and this is continuing tonight and is forecast for tomorrow as well. Add to the fact that there is no breeze around, that air temperatures during the day today reached 40 degrees and are still at 29 degrees while I write this during the night and you can only imagine the discomfort levels.

On deck there is nowhere to escape the intense heat and fierce suns rays and below deck it is a sweat box. We are all focussing on the meditative state [that] Hot yoga classes get you to by the end during the stretching. This is how it feels. 

The worst part of the day is when Liz has to charge the batteries. With the engine on to make this happen, temperatures below deck get even more uncomfortable.

However, today for the first time, we saw some sea life. It started with some jelly fish that were super small and were white when in the sunshine and changed to black when in the shadow of our hull.

Then we saw a large log floating. The sad news was that around this log was some rope and fishing net with fishing lines coming off it. Swimming around the log and debris were a number of smaller fish feeding from the weed that had collected, then swimming around below the log were a couple of sharks.

This was very cool.

Dee and Team TTTOP

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35 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

& Almost anybody's guess who :-(

SS

True enough, ;)  Doubt anyone can honestly think MAPF in 6th  is now dismissed.

The East Wind has let the others go, for fear MAPF will catch the east wind first, as described by Horace on the Live this morning. Tsk tsk. Pascal must be in full rant mode carefully considering the options. 

No matter. Racing is gripping.

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Update from Vestas 11th Hour Racing OBR Amory Ross:

Lat/Long: 6.589S 162.031E
Wind: 2 kts
Air Temp: 36c
Sea Temp: 32c
Boatspeed: 3 kts
Heading: 29-degrees

One of the fun things about the Doldrums is that it’s never the same twice. It won’t ever give you the pleasure of knowing what you’re going to get when you go in, and it will certainly never give you any idea once you’re in of just how long it’s going to take to get out. You get what you get and you make the most of it. Randomness, luck, and extreme heat rule this part of the world…

Today we drifted. We drifted a lot and sailed very little. SiFi’s nav computer told him it would take us over 1,000 days to get to the Philippines at one point. Fortunately, that’s now down to 70 days and it’s never always such a vacant vacuum of wind – but today it looked like it could be and we all wondered just how long we might float here sweating through our days.

The good news is that we’re not alone in our lack of progress and we don’t need to wait six hours for a sked to find out. We can clearly see AkzoNobel, MAPFRE, Dongfeng and TTOP, and it appears like everyone’s in the same zone of weather. 

Patience will obviously be key, as will be monitoring the skies overnight for any sign of cloud development. Clouds bring wind and wind brings life… one cloud could make all the difference!

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18 minutes ago, stief said:

True enough, ;)  Doubt anyone can honestly think MAPF in 6th  is now dismissed.

The East Wind has let the others go, for fear MAPF will catch the east wind first, as described by Horace on the Live this morning. Tsk tsk. Pascal must be in full rant mode carefully considering the options. 

No matter. Racing is gripping.

A bit worrisome for Mapfre and Dongfeng.  When the breeze fills in, a small deficit could easily turn into a 50 mile lead or more for Akzo and Vestas. 

Scally may well look like Akzo in the last one, drifting over the line days later.

 

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Wonder if any skipper will entice crew to hop over the side with a sponge in this heat. 2-3 knots in 30° water with no antifouling and might start to see some soft biogrowth. 

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18 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Wonder if any skipper will entice crew to hop over the side with a sponge in this heat. 2-3 knots in 30° water with no antifouling and might start to see some soft biogrowth. 

I doubt they need much enticement given the sweltering heat. Probably enticement to get back out is more like it, along with timing of the whole operation.

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36 minutes ago, stief said:

True enough, ;)  Doubt anyone can honestly think MAPF in 6th  is now dismissed.

The East Wind has let the others go, for fear MAPF will catch the east wind first, as described by Horace on the Live this morning. Tsk tsk. Pascal must be in full rant mode carefully considering the options. 

No matter. Racing is gripping.

I think you mean Cammas. Its looking tough to beat Vestas and Akzo's position at the moment. One thing us U.S sailors generally know how to cope with its sweltering heat + no breeze.

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17 minutes ago, southerncross said:

A bit worrisome for Mapfre and Dongfeng.  When the breeze fills in, a small deficit could easily turn into a 50 mile lead or more for Akzo and Vestas. 

Scally may well look like Akzo in the last one, drifting over the line days later.

Agree. More than a bit worrisome. Despite the 'head for the new wind' truism, sticking close to the pod leaders VS11 , AKZO (and the spa resort on TTOP) would have seemed better.

Of course, in such light winds there is often little choice. Still, experts at any game of chance are determined in the long run by how they play the odds.

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There is also the general rule of covering your rival. I would say Dongfeng are playing the odds pretty well and staying between Mapfre and the exit. The downside is they may also let VS11 get away. Akzo are the wildcard of this leg, they have clearly figured out how to sail the boat well and started gelling as a team. Scally continue zig-zaging across the course (much worse than the rest of the fleet I'll point out). At this pace they unfortunately could end up well behind the leaders.

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28 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Wonder if any skipper will entice crew to hop over the side with a sponge in this heat. 2-3 knots in 30° water with no antifouling and might start to see some soft biogrowth. 

I would suspect a slight residue is possible.  At least jump in to check the intake for the water.  Not much relief from the heat in the bath water. 

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I would suspect a slight residue is possible.  At least jump in to check the intake for the water.  Not much relief from the heat in the bath water. 

"whomever sponges the hull gets a liter of freshwater to rinse off."

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Damn wifi here. Tried to acknowledge that I meant Cammas, and agree that light air sailing is as much a test of a team as the heavy air. 

Re allowing a scrubber, why risk a sailor as bait? 

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Just now, stief said:

Damn wifi here. Tried to acknowledge that I meant Cammas, and agree that light air sailing is as much a test of a team as the heavy air. 

Re allowing a scrubber, why risk a sailor as bait? 

Uncharacteristic of you.  Too many margaritas I suspect.

Very low risk of a shark or one big enough to worry about.  Could easily spot them anyway.

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1 hour ago, gregwilkins said:

 The open 60's used to be very wet boats, but the latest generation all has really good crew protection in the form of much larger coachroof overhangs - even with slide back covers and lookout bubbles.   

New generations of offshore boats get faster and more protected from the front, because they are faster.  When the VO65 was designed, the protective aspects were touted for being that much safer than the VO70.

The VO65 is now an old boat though, and it ain't just the coachroof that gives it away

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20 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Uncharacteristic of you.  Too many margaritas I suspect.

Very low risk of a shark or one big enough to worry about.  Could easily spot them anyway.

Well, can’t blame the drinks. :) Bikinis maybe. There are a lot of predators circling the pools here.

was thinking of parasites, and all the other critters in tropical waters. Same kind of risk management that eating in China involved last two editions if you follow what I mean. These are unknown waters for almost all the teams.

Still think it a fair question. Why risk a sailor overboard for a bit of slight residue?

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Just now, stief said:

Still think it a fair question. Why risk a sailor overboard for a bit of slight residue?

Because frictional drag (amongst others) is perhaps the biggest detriment to speed.

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Desperation

9 / 01 / 2018 | 

Desperation is probably the only word to describe how we feel sailing through these Doldrums! Basically I could just write one word instead 100!

Anyway, things are going ok, I guess, sailing on speeds around 2 knots and happy when the heading is inside the 45 degrees from course….

The same for all of us though so we are trying not to complain too much and move forward. In any moment a gust will come, then another one and suddenly we are off, but we have to say these doldrums are being seriously painful. I guess we could average these with the ones in leg 2 (inexistent) and we would have two normal Doldrums…

For the rest everyone ok, just complaining about the heat… but all good on board MAPFRE.

I hope we can keep the fleet together and hopefully start sailing soon.

Best,

Xabi.

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Well, the teams are able to watch the clouds develop and guess at currents, either of which is more likely to help them escape more than residue. Checking for  plastic and such, though, well worth a dive.C80F26DD-2C1C-486B-87FE-337B0DCBBFE1.thumb.jpeg.e3713630b2988fa0c56b8d413df629bf.jpeg

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BOUWE BLOG BLOG #33

100 mile in 24 hour. 

The last 24 hours have been a unicum in the race sofar, covering just over 100 miles in 24 hours..........than all of a sudden it is longggg way to Hongkong. But we are enjoying it someway somehow. 

Trimming all the time, shifting gears to try to get the maximum out of each puff of breeze. Some times tacking, sometimes gybing as the wind is all over the show. So the weather forecast / models again show they suck in this area, so we are aiming to what we think is the best course in the long term. 

Birthday Carlo
Carlo couldn't haven't wished a better birthday he said and of course got an extra bite of our world famous the Graaf cookies The off watch sleeping either in the bow below or even some on deck, as it is nice and cool there.

Sam's knee is finally getting better, hopefully, he is 100 % soon. Jens is dreaming of how nice it would be right now back home, where it is -7 C, he prefers the cold of the heat, so he 
picked the right leg to come:-)

This afternoon had a massive school of fish jumping and splashing around the boat, like of they were getting chased by some bigger fish, we first spotted a couple of Dolphins  working in formation, but then they disappeared, probably because of full belly's, but the fish kept jumping, so some other predators must have been on the chase.

Yann and the love for his drone
Yann got his favourite toy out:his drone and has hopefully taken some got shots. Kyle took the opportunity during a super light patch to have a look at the underwater ship, the first small barnacles are appearing and he noticed some damage at the leading edges of the rudders. All right time for me to find a place to sleep and dream about my girls back home, they for sure would have loved to be here right now.

Cheers,
Bouwe

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29 minutes ago, stief said:

Well, can’t blame the drinks. :) Bikinis maybe. There are a lot of predators circling the pools here.

was thinking of parasites, and all the other critters in tropical waters. Same kind of risk management that eating in China involved last two editions if you follow what I mean. These are unknown waters for almost all the teams.

Still think it a fair question. Why risk a sailor overboard for a bit of slight residue?

I've never heard of anyone being attacked at sea by sharks while swimming by their boat in glassy seas. The health and safety board may disagree, but taking a dip in the middle of the ocean is the only nice thing about being becalmed. 

As for parasites and bad bugs? To my knowledge, marine organisms and land mammals may have some biocompatibi issues. But I'm all ears if someone has exp. We certainly drink water from the watermarker and it is cleaner than anything from a tap. 

I've certainly never worried about marine water.  I wouldn't swim downstream of Dupont factory, warm freshwater pond or near Guangzhou. It is the brackwish water that seems like only foreign vacationers play by in tropical beaches that's scary. 

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Just now, southerncross said:

Kyle took the opportunity during a super light patch to have a look at the underwater ship, the first small barnacles are appearing and he noticed some damage at the leading edges of the rudders.

Incredible how quickly this grows in the warmer water.  

Imagine all the teams have taken a look at the bottoms.  There are some heavier conditions coming up in the China Sea.

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6 minutes ago, Miffy said:

I've never heard of anyone being attacked at sea by sharks while swimming by their boat in glassy seas. The health and safety board may disagree, but taking a dip in the middle of the ocean is the only nice thing about being becalmed. 

As for parasites and bad bugs? To my knowledge, marine organisms and land mammals may have some biocompatibi issues. But I'm all ears if someone has exp. We certainly drink water from the watermarker and it is cleaner than anything from a tap. 

I've certainly never worried about marine water.  I wouldn't swim downstream of Dupont factory, warm freshwater pond or near Guangzhou. It is the brackwish water that seems like only foreign vacationers play by in tropical beaches that's scary. 

All true IMHO.   Won't be swimming for a week because off the run off we're getting due to the heavy rain.  A lot of bacteria.  

The only danger might be an Oceanic White Tip but they don't hunt like a Great White for example, ambushing.  Water might be too warm for them as well.

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

All true IMHO.   Won't be swimming for a week because off the run off we're getting due to the heavy rain.  A lot of bacteria.  

The only danger might be an Oceanic White Tip but they don't hunt like a Great White for example, ambushing.  Water might be too warm for them as well.

IMO sharks are overrated threat caused by Hollywood and lack of exp by the general public. They're not insane predators, but opportunistic eaters. 

Reef sharks are more aggressive. Surfers look like injured seals. The smaller sharks in warm deep waters probably think you're the danger. 

My marine phobia are orcas. Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one even in a boat. 

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6 minutes ago, Miffy said:

IMO sharks are overrated threat caused by Hollywood and lack of exp by the general public. They're not insane predators, but opportunistic eaters. 

Reef sharks are more aggressive. Surfers look like injured seals. The smaller sharks in warm deep waters probably think you're the danger. 

My marine phobia are orcas. Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one even in a boat. 

That myth has been dispelled for quite a while now.  They are endangered now mostly from Chinese and Taiwanese fishing boats in protected waters cutting the fins off and throwing the live sharks back in the water.

 

 

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I can see that - Taiwanese fleet in Mauritius was friendly and generous, but I woultn't want to be marine life in South China Sea/Coral Sea/Pacific. 

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2 minutes ago, Miffy said:

I can see that - Taiwanese fleet in Mauritius was friendly and generous, but I woultn't want to be marine life in South China Sea/Coral Sea/Pacific. 

70% of all shark finning passes through Hong Kong.  I wonder what the VOR thinks of that?

Hong Kong's shark fin soup has long been a controversial staple of the city's diet, and an industry that sustains thousands of livelihoods. But some people here say a vote scheduled at the United Nations on the welfare of the blue shark could threaten their businesses and 500 years of culture. 

 

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6 minutes ago, southerncross said:

70% of all shark finning passes through Hong Kong.  I wonder what the VOR thinks of that?

Hong Kong's shark fin soup has long been a controversial staple of the city's diet, and an industry that sustains thousands of livelihoods. But some people here say a vote scheduled at the United Nations on the welfare of the blue shark could threaten their businesses and 500 years of culture. 

 

I love China and Taiwan. I've eaten dog meat in Taiwan in the 80s. But southern Chinese cusine sometimes really pushes my personal limit for "it is our heritage so screw sustainability or anything else."

Last time there was a massive new flu strain and word on the street in HK was it was some crossed strain that went from farmed chickens and farmed ferrets to ppl. 

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Ah...the warm glow cast by the VOR Tracker standings: Brunel is doing well. ;)

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4 minutes ago, Miffy said:

I love China and Taiwan. I've eaten dog meat in Taiwan in the 80s. But southern Chinese cusine sometimes really pushes my personal limit for "it is our heritage so screw sustainability or anything else."

Last time there was a massive new flu strain and word on the street in HK was it was some crossed strain that went from farmed chickens and farmed ferrets to ppl. 

Plenty of those fuckers off the Northland, NZL coast at the moment. Time for a cull?

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I'm sure some have done the rock and roll in light conditions (not racing).

If becalmed and you've got enough chord length on the keel and with just the main up, you can rock the boat port/starboard and generate enough lift over the keel to generate a decent headway going.  On a 30' footer we could get a couple of knots. Beat sitting around.

Edit:  Also a relatively narrow boat by todays standards.  And yes, I know.  Not possible on these boats.

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18 minutes ago, Miffy said:

IMO sharks are overrated threat caused by Hollywood and lack of exp by the general public. They're not insane predators, but opportunistic eaters. 

Reef sharks are more aggressive. Surfers look like injured seals. The smaller sharks in warm deep waters probably think you're the danger. 

My marine phobia are orcas. Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one even in a boat. 

Having been within 50' of multiple orca pods on many occasions when they've approached us while sailing (NOT on a whale watch boat),  never have felt any threat.

(But then agoraphobics have never actually been threatened by an open market place, so phobias are just...personal phobias.  Me...I hate snakes and sharks.)

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1 minute ago, Sailbydate said:

Plenty of those fuckers off the Northland, NZL coast at the moment. Time for a cull?

For sure. Time for the locals and indigenous peoples to take back their waters.

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4 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Having been within 50' of multiple orca pods on many occasions when they've approached us while sailing (NOT on a whale watch boat),  never have felt any threat.

(But then agoraphobics have never actually been threatened by an open market place, so phobias are just...personal phobias.  Me...I hate snakes and sharks.)

It isn't their behavior that gives me the creepy, but the eyes. Always felt that if it wanted to, it KNOWS it can take a diving leap and snatch a sailor out of a cockpit. I also have a phobia of apes, in particular chimps. 

Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one. 

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49 minutes ago, Miffy said:

My marine phobia are orcas. Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one even in a boat. 

Fun fact - A human has never been attacked by an orca in the wild.  

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21 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

I hate snakes and sharks.

I saw Jaws in the theatre when it was first released in Sydney.  Fucked for life.

But then several years ago, I was swimming along the So. CA coast and two juvenile Great Whites (8ft) pulled in along side me.  No aggressive behavior.  Just curious and cruising for fish.  Cute little buggers.  The fear vanished immediately.

It's a seasonal thing.  The big females migrate north every Spring during the grunion run to pup.  We see more and more juvies with the warming water and they hang around longer before leaving for the South.  A good sign.

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8 minutes ago, Roleur said:

Fun fact - A human has never been attacked by an orca in the wild.  

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Miffy said:

It isn't their behavior that gives me the creepy, but the eyes. Always felt that if it wanted to, it KNOWS it can take a diving leap and snatch a sailor out of a cockpit. I also have a phobia of apes, in particular chimps. 

Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one. 

I've seen them do that to ducks and seals, but sailors...nope.  The poor ducks just plain disappear.  Chomp.

Meanwhile the Plastics seem to have something going.  Good for them, I say.  Climbing the learning curve.

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Phobias: jellyfish stings and public hot tubs :P

then there’s this to counter the phobias

 

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Not as if the designers would not have known.  This is a one-design fleet so if they all had a drier bow, any negatives self cancel.

Reverse Bows — Pros & Cons

"So with the positives already stated, let's now look at the negative things and see how they balance out for the type of boat we are considering.
First and foremost I believe, are the undeniable fact that reverse bows are wet. VERY wet! …as these bows go more THROUGH the waves and less over them. While a race boat may choose to disregard this 'inconvenience', it could make doing a passage in a steep chop such a miserable experience that you just stay in port"

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2 hours ago, southerncross said:

Because frictional drag (amongst others) is perhaps the biggest detriment to speed.

Correct: At low speeds frictional resistance is greatest - while at high speeds wave making resistance is greatest. I'd certainly have crew members over the side scrubbing at least the forward third of the hull and the forward third of all appendages - given enough time drifting, may as well take enough time to scrub everything. This is why if we have a race in light air, it's best to take time to scrub the whole hull and appendages. If it's a wee bit more then light air, at least scrub the forward third of the hull and appendages(foils), where the flow is laminar and attached(though I usually take time to scrub all appendages completely).

005b.JPG

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Thread drift alive and well also for Brisbane Bill’s run at his West-about record as he approaches the horn (hope he makes it around this time).

Quote
09 January 2018 | 425 Miles to Cape Horn

How Long Is A Piece of String?

11:00am Tuesday 9th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) Young people of today worried about the ever increasing pollution of our oceans with the excess of plastic wrapping must yearn for the simpler times of my childhood. We lived in a little village without a corner store so each Saturday morning the grocer from Brooklyn ( only That railway station was called Hawkesbury River ) would come down the path with a large wicker basket under his arm with the weeks supply of groceries. The flour and the sugar and the salt came in brown paper bags tied up with pieces of string and once the amount was totted up on a pad headed " Bushells - The Tea of Flavour" and paid for, with a flourish, by cheque and pleasantries exchanged, the first job was to carefully save the pieces of string. The brown paper bags were smoothed out and saved to contain our school lunches and of course as the week progressed the wrappings on the butter were saved to line the tins of those most gorgeous sponge cakes. Made with the whites of the eggs from our own ducks , with a squeeze of Valencia orange juice from our tree and cooked in a wood fired oven and with passion fruit icing from our own vine they had a flavour not attainable from your modern food factory. And those pieces of string? Well of course they were all of different lengths so a popular saying of the time when asked how long a job would take would be " How Long is a piece of string? " And perhaps a Professor of Astrophysics had a similar background and sought the answer through the rigorous application of the equations of Einsteins Theory of General Relativity. You will be pleased to know that he found the answer so if anyone should ask you " How long is a piece of string? ", just shoot back with the reply " .00000000000000000000000000000000001616 of a millimetre" which is the exact length of one of those strings which is trying unsuccessfully to hold the Universe from flying apart. Much more successful was our grocer who never spilled so much as a grain of salt.

 

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Another week gone... for good... of our lifetimes... but at least it was filled with VOR stuff :D:

For the English hearers:

 

For the hearers of whatever:

 

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43 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I saw Jaws in the theatre when it was first released in Sydney.  Fucked for life.

But then several years ago, I was swimming along the So. CA coast and two juvenile Great Whites (8ft) pulled in along side me.  No aggressive behavior.  Just curious and cruising for fish.  Cute little buggers.  The fear vanished immediately.

It's a seasonal thing.  The big females migrate north every Spring during the grunion run to pup.  We see more and more juvies with the warming water and they hang around longer before leaving for the South.  A good sign.

Your heart rate must have been a little bit elevated during that encounter, SouthernX. 

I recall sailing my P Class as a kid in our annual round Mahurangi Island race. I was beating to windward and stacking for all money, when a dolphin came up from astern and surfaced just near my right shoulder. Naturally, I thought it was shark. A truly brown trouser moment. 

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Good summary to a YW article summarizing how the trials and errors of this race have advanced the sport. Of course, ”any number of blazered armchair sailors said it could never be done.”

 

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1 minute ago, Sailbydate said:

Your heart rate must have been a little bit elevated during that encounter, SouthernX. 

The worst "walk on water" moment I got was on a dark gloomy morning when a Harbour Seal came up behind me and nudged my feet.  Their noses feel like an octopus.  Anyway, they're pretty friendly and follow us the whole swim.  Dolphins too.  The little ones turn sideways to get a good look.

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

Some light air set up instruction by none other than Brian Thompson.

 

A few pointers I might add about sailing in light wind and zephyrs. It's helpful to have a set of light air sheets or even several pair with the lightest for zephyrs. High tech or those cash short, cheap thin nylon line for zepher conditions....along with a set of light air sheets. This will allow the top of the sail to twist off more, which is needed in light air.

To help the main twist off more, I lift the boom with the boom lift, which is something many modern boats don't have now days. I then lock in the twist by tightening the boom vang and running a shock cord from the bail of the boom vang to the deck or the rail, depending on the point of sail: this keeps the shape in the main, from getting shook out by leftover chop, swell or powerboat wakes.

Crew weight should be forward, with most all crew members in front of the shrouds. If it's cold or cooler out I ask if any crew would mind going below and sitting forward and to leeward: this gets weight down below and centered, which allows the boat to recover quicker from any hobby horsing from a wave or any hull movement.

Here in the PNW nylon drifters also know as wind seekers back in the day were more common. These days one still sees those who know better, breakout the drifter when the wind goes to zephyrs. If one doesn't have a nylon drifter, then as Dr. Stuart Walker pointed out years ago, hoist a 100-110%, which is more effective then a larger headsail.

If conditions are going from light to zephyrs drop the l53% to about half the hoist...being as how it's zephyr conditions, and being as the zephyr wind isn't going to push the sail out,basically use the lifelines to rest the lower half of the sail against to hold the angle....wind picks up to light, give the sail a full hoist, goes back to zephyrs drop her back down....had more then a few boats look at me with the WTF look as I sailed past them....it works...asked after what I was doing - my reply...winning!

Dash 34 hoisting a windseeker in zephyrs, and pulls away - though we caught him later and it was cat and mouse to the finish, with us finishing just ahead - though over the time limit by about 20 minutes.

 

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When it rains in Southern California, it can really pour sometimes -  the same as the SW desert when they get gully washers. Don't get washed away.

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A little piece written for Boothy several years ago.

An old acquaintance moved to Arizona, because he wanted to get away from Hell-A aka: LA, California. He tried moving to Florida a couple years ago. I warned him that 100% of Californians who move to Florida, return within a year, or at the most, within a couple of years. He returned to California that fall.....Soooo... he found a place by Cochise, AZ and moved there a couple months ago.

He didn't last a year in Florida, perhaps he'll fair better in Arizona. I would imagine his late spring and summer will go something like this.....

.....moved to Arizona! Now this is a state that knows how to live!! Beautiful sunny days and warm balmy evenings. What a place! It is beautiful. I love it here.

May 20th: Beautiful sunny days and mountains and deserts blended together. What a place! Watched the sunset, it was beautiful. I've finally found my home. I love it here.

Fast forward about a month.....

June 14th: Really heating up. Got to 100 today. Not a problem. Live in an air-conditioned home and have a Scout with no top to drive around. What a pleasure to see the sun every day like this. I'm turning into a real sun worshiper.

June 30th: The previous owners had the backyard landscaped with western plants. Lots of cactus and rocks. What a breeze to maintain. No more mowing for me. Another scorcher today, but I love it here.

July 10th: The temperature hasn't been below 100 all week. How do people get used to this kind of heat? At least it's a dry heat. Getting used to it is taking longer than I expected. Driving around in my Scout, the wind sucks. It feels like a giant freaking blow dryer ! ! !

July 20th: Fell asleep by the pool. Got 3rd degree burns over 60% of my body, mostly my face, chest and legs. Burnt the hair right off, now I have less hair on the front of my scalp then ever before. DAMN... DAMN, DAMN, AND DOUBLE DAMN! I spent a week recovering, and my whole frontside, face and scalp still hurts like hell. What a dumb thing to do. I learned my lesson though: got to respect the ol' sun in a climate like this. It's hotter then hell driving with no top, so looked on Craigs list till I found a top in Utah, drove up and bought it, and installed it on the Scout. Then paid $1500 stinking bucks to have an air conditioner installed, but at least I won't sweat my balls off driving in this heat.

July 25th: Dry heat, my butt. Hot is hot! The home air-conditioner is on the fritz and the A/C repairman charged $250 just to drive by and tell me he needed to order parts. Drove over to the neighbors and his cat snuck into my Scout. Drove to town for some shopping and didn't know the cat was in there. By the time I got done shopping, the cat had died and swollen up to the size of a shopping bag, then popped like a water balloon. The Scout now smells like Kibbles and shits. I learned my lesson though, I'll check the back of the Scout for stray pets. Good ol' Mr. Sun strikes again.

July 30th: Been sleeping outside by the pool for three nights now. $1,000 in damn house payments and we can't even go inside. Why did I ever come here?

August 4th: 115 degrees! Finally got the air-conditioner fixed today. It cost $1,200 and gets the temperature down to about 90. I hate this hellhole of a state.

August 8th: If another wise ass cracks, "Hot enough for you today?" I'm going to tear his fricking throat out. Damn heat. By the time I got to town the radiator is boiling over, my clothes are soaking wet, and and I smell like baked cat!!

August 10th: The weather report might as well be a damn recording: Hot and Sunny, Hot and Sunny, Hot and Sunny..... It's been too hot to sleep for two damn months and the weatherman says it might really warm up next week. Doesn't it ever rain in this barren damn desert? $1,700 worth of cactus just dried up and blew into the damn pool. Even a cactus can't live in this heat. I hate this stupid fricking hellhole. Tried to run some errands this afternoon. Wore shorts, and when I sat on the seats in the car, I thought my butt was on fire. My skin melted to the seat. I lost 2 layers of flesh and all the hair on the back of my legs and butt . . . Now my Scout smells like burnt hair, fried butt, and baked cat.

August 14th: Welcome to Hell! Temperature got to 120 today. Forgot to crack the window and blew the dang blasted fricking windshield out of the Scout. The installer came to fix it and said, "Hot enough for you today?" My wife had to spend the house payment to bail me out of jail.

August 30th: Worst day of the damn summer. I'm not leaving the house.

September 1st: The fricking monsoon rains finally came and all they did is to make it muggier than hell. The Scout is now floating somewhere in Mexico with its new $500 windshield, $1500 air conditioner, and the cheap top I found on Craigslist. Nobody told me about staying out of the washes during a "flash flood" warning. That does it. We're moving back to Hell-A, and I don't give a rat's ass if it's next to the freeway. What kind of a sick demented idiot would want to live here??!!!

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10 minutes ago, boomer said:

A little piece written for Boothy several years ago.

An old acquaintance moved to Arizona, because he wanted to get away from Hell-A aka: LA, California. He tried moving to Florida a couple years ago. I warned him that 100% of Californians who move to Florida, return within a year, or at the most, within a couple of years. He returned to California that fall.....Soooo... he found a place by Cochise, AZ and moved there a couple months ago.

Fact or historical fiction, no matter. Point well made. Still laughing. Thanks

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Boomer,  Boothy's trials and tribulations were hilarious (I mean the way he described them).

My son is going to college near Redmond.  Beautiful up there.  But the wind is so light.  

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Glad you all enjoyed it. I thought it was appropriate under the circumstances. Had to write it in Boothy speak, which helped a lot.

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I remember when he posted about getting stuck to the seat.  Laughed my ass off.  Lost track of the thread.  Missed the part about the monsoon. LOL

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I saved the piece about Boothy several years ago on my FB page, though I made a few edits since then,  that are wee bit better (descriptive).

Yes in central and particularly in south sound it's real light. In north Puget Sound to Admiralty Inlet where I live we get a bit more breeze: mainly due to the cooler air in the Staits of Juan de Fuca and the warmer temps in the Puget Sound. Also getting a three to four point pressure difference, when a large low pressure spreads between northern waters around Bellingham across to Victoria and southern waters have higher pressure around Seattle area to West Sound will generate good Westerly which turns into a Northwesterly, from Dungeness Spit in the Straits all the way to Point No Point in the sound, and still blow 18-22 Northerly in the North sound from Kingston/Apple Point to Point No Point.

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3 hours ago, Miffy said:

IMO sharks are overrated threat caused by Hollywood and lack of exp by the general public. They're not insane predators, but opportunistic eaters. 

Reef sharks are more aggressive. Surfers look like injured seals. The smaller sharks in warm deep waters probably think you're the danger. 

My marine phobia are orcas. Beautiful but I'd never want to be near one even in a boat. 

+100. agree Orcas are a little freaky, 'the wolf of the seas'.

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3 hours ago, southerncross said:

I saw Jaws in the theatre when it was first released in Sydney.  Fucked for life.

But then several years ago, I was swimming along the So. CA coast and two juvenile Great Whites (8ft) pulled in along side me.  No aggressive behavior.  Just curious and cruising for fish.  Cute little buggers.  The fear vanished immediately.

It's a seasonal thing.  The big females migrate north every Spring during the grunion run to pup.  We see more and more juvies with the warming water and they hang around longer before leaving for the South.  A good sign.

funny you use the word 'cute' to describe the younger ones, but they indeed are.

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31 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Is it coming to this?

Well, alt-wildlife options available here,  just in time for the early risers in the underworld:

Quote

Parties

They knew how to hold parties during the early years. With none of the crew and PR regimes that police Volvo raceboats today, hedonistic events were fuelled by the sponsor’s brew and an ethic among crews that what goes on on tour stays on tour. In a libertine era, life ashore was played out to the full.

The most notable parties – or at least those that can be written about – include a riotous affair at a local yacht club during the 1973-74 race, when Clare Francis led a conga straight into the swimming pool. That night ended in a haze of tear gas as riot police charged into this millionaire’s oasis to clear out the prostitutes.

Peter Blake inaugurated the Garden Party aboard Ceramco New Zealand in 1986, but the most memorable event was on Lion New Zealand four years later during the Punta del Este stopover. Called on to bring a plant to the boat, guests excelled themselves by denuding hotels and restaurants of every potplant not bolted down. One crew even arrived pulling a palm tree behind their VW transporter, having ripped it out of the harbour boulevard.

Then again, the vid does encourage the ceviche and happy hour option.

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48 minutes ago, Miffy said:

 

Hey look Tiger is back on Scallywag! 

Yeh, he looks very sexy. and that's Pooh on the helm.

Talking about poo and zero wind, I'll tell you a true story...

At the end of my watch I produced a beautiful curly one, all in one piece laid out on the glassy sea. The next watch must really have fucked up, because when I came back on watch 4 hrs later, we drifted right passed it again, still in one piece, I recognized it!