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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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SailNDive

Slightly Obscure But Very Helpful

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Give us all some tips that we may not know... sailing, navigating, mooring, docking.... something that is good for us all to have in our back pockets but are unlikely to run across somewhere else.  

 

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practice heaving to....useful in other than survival conditions...take a break from a nasty beat...heave to....cook and enjoy meal...sort shit out...make a repair before the night watches...do what ever in retaliative calm before resuming~~~~

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12 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

5a29c29a3579c_HowtoSailDaveBarry.thumb.jpg.77ac6c26a5b5b2a0bb781f5d739ce594.jpg

 

Thanks to Hobot for this tidbit of wisdom.

So that’s why I never can get back to my mooring 

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8 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

practice heaving to....useful in other than survival conditions...take a break from a nasty beat...heave to....cook and enjoy meal...sort shit out... before the night watches...do what ever in retaliative calm before resuming~~~~

+1

You don't have to keep charging along when conditions get unpleasant if you have sea room.  Also if you have an inboard it can work wonders in rough weather; it's not just for calm water.

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Head up in the puffs, and fall off, in the lulls.

Spring line can help you get off the dock, or back on.

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Tying to dock, specially single-handed: use a single line, attached at the center of the boat, and tie abreast. Then, take care of the usual bow and stern lines  and spring and whaterver. Works all the time. I dont know why it is not more popular - maybe because it looks like something only a total beginer would do? Merci Voiles etVoilers !

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2 hours ago, Ganzi said:

Tying to dock, specially single-handed: use a single line, attached at the center of the boat, and tie abreast. Then, take care of the usual bow and stern lines  and spring and whaterver. Works all the time. I dont know why it is not more popular - maybe because it looks like something only a total beginer would do? Merci Voiles etVoilers !

Trying to dock a catamaran, use a single line, attached at the bow. Get that bow near the dock, crew loops over cleat on dock and locks it off as short as they can without trying to pull the boat anywhere, you then use both engines to slowly rotate the boat onto the dock (fwd on dock side, reverse on other side). Single-handed, if you have outboard helms like a Catana, same procedure but with a line at the stern beside the helm (you have to be careful of the transoms as you approach).

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If you run aground on mud or sand, DON'T use reverse(as it piles sand on the keel).. Rather, put the rudder hard over, swing the boom out all the way and get  a crewman or two to hang off it. Goose the engine in forward gear and attempt to get the boat spinning on its keel from the prop wash on the rudder and  dig a hole in the sand with your 40 plus ft corkscrew. Keep an eye on exactly the route you came in on while your spinning and take it back out first chance.  After that, anchor properly and get out a proper corkscrew.

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Red, Right, Returning.

 

And thanks Rasper....but it was actually Woody in a moment of clearity *shudder* that posted that Dave Barry quip.

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3 hours ago, fufkin said:

If you run aground on mud or sand, DON'T use reverse(as it piles sand on the keel).. Rather, put the rudder hard over, swing the boom out all the way and get  a crewman or two to hang off it. Goose the engine in forward gear and attempt to get the boat spinning on its keel from the prop wash on the rudder and  dig a hole in the sand with your 40 plus ft corkscrew. Keep an eye on exactly the route you came in on while your spinning and take it back out first chance.  After that, anchor properly and get out a proper corkscrew.

Hımmm, Is this still valid for a 2m fin keel (no bulb) and saildrive? Thanks..

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3 hours ago, hobot said:

Red, Right, Returning.

 

Not in the civilised world, it's not.

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8 hours ago, fufkin said:

If you run aground on mud or sand, DON'T use reverse(as it piles sand on the keel).. Rather, put the rudder hard over, swing the boom out all the way and get  a crewman or two to hang off it. Goose the engine in forward gear and attempt to get the boat spinning on its keel from the prop wash on the rudder and  dig a hole in the sand with your 40 plus ft corkscrew. Keep an eye on exactly the route you came in on while your spinning and take it back out first chance.  After that, anchor properly and get out a proper corkscrew.

If you have a life raft, hang the life raft from the end of the boom while the crew is out there. Adds about 100 lbs of leverage right where you need it the most.

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Wow!  some great tips (and some really funny comments!) . keep 'em coming!  
A tip that I discovered is that if you purchase a Navionics chip for navigation in your chartplotter be sure to register it as soon as possible after purchasing because it will allow you to get free updates for a year.  

Another tip, maybe not hugely obscure but was really useful for us was to use an anchor chain instead of anchor line.  It helps a ton with staying put in high winds.

 

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4 hours ago, aquax said:

Hımmm, Is this still valid for a 2m fin keel (no bulb) and saildrive? Thanks..

Aquax, good question but I'm gonna say yes, still valid. I'll admit that I've had the good/mis fortune of doing this on a 31 ft and a 47 ft, both with fin keels (no bulbs) and sail drives, albeit the draft wasn't quite 2 metres. The bigger question is the location (and size) of the rudder in relation to the prop so as to effect prop wash and give the boat a spin. With a thinnish spade rudder located well aft of the prop, it might be difficult.

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Practice safety procedures when it is unpleasant.  MOB drill and reefing practice in 6 might cover the registration checklist but it won't help you when you really need the knowledge.

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You clear a fouled anchor chain with a J hook.

 

not many non comercial seaman know of a j hook and how to use it 

 

google it. 

 

Yacht size J hooks are made from a mini  bruce anchor, 2kg,  with its flukes cut off , then rigged with two lines to be self tipping .

 

oil industry J hook 

 

IMG_7225.JPG

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The more hitches you throw at the dock cleat the better the boat will stay in the slip and not wander off.

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Something PNW sailors usually know, but East coast sailors often don't, is that in most conditions you really don't need a 7:1 or 8:1 or 10:1 scope on your anchor rode. 3:1 or 4:1 is usually plenty, and then you're not swinging into the neighbors, at least not uninvited.

Recently, I saw a 60' center cockpit with a big sat dome and a CQR anchor, put a 200' pile of chain on the bottom just behind the anchor in 10' of water. Guy sets anchor, walks forward and you hear the windlass clink clink clink paying out chain for two minutes. He bought all that nice chain and wants to get his money's worth.

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A reefed mizzen and a stays'l will get you to weather better than a double reefed main and small jib in really nasty conditions...at least on many full keeled ketches

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When racing in really light airs, keep the boat moving regardless of the direction.  It's better than trying to doggedly hold a course to the finish line and going nowhere, or backwards. 

(Credits go to LB for this one)

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Always know what the placards onboard mean. The green one below for example means that families of five are to run east.

 

image.png.5342a5723847af5e758e146fb1a3b24e.png

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4 minutes ago, lasal said:

Always know what the placards onboard mean. The green one below for example means that families of five are to run east.

 

image.png.5342a5723847af5e758e146fb1a3b24e.png

70's flying a Bahamian 20 seat island hopper...the well used plane of eastern European origin had English translated placards below the OEM signage ....one said...In case of emergency exit through toilet....wish I had taken a photo...

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5 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

70's flying a Bahamian 20 seat island hopper...the well used plane of eastern European origin had English translated placards below the OEM signage ....one said...In case of emergency exit through toilet....wish I had taken a photo...

image.png.6ac59062b8fdb00020bfd692bdb30969.png

And inside the red tube on the right is the "Fire Control Plan". The plan is written on a scroll of asbestos based paper in sixty languages. After you read it you can use it as a fire blanket.

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A clean boat's a fast boat's a happy boat...  ;)  

Never piss into the wind.  

If ya gotta hurl, downwind and to leeward is best.  

Always bring something for the boat when crewing for first time.  

Be the first to do something no one wants to do.  Do it quickly and correctly before anyone gets a chance to stop you.  

Never crack a beer before the skipper/deck boss.  

Leave the boat better than when you got there. 

Never use the head unless the situation is dire or you are willing to fix/clean it when it goes south.  Buckets are a ton easier to clean than a fucked up macerator.

If sleeping aboard at away regattas, have boat prepped and ready before skip arrives from hotel.

Clean up your mess (lines trash winches etc) before the off watch hits the deck.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, hobot said:

The more hitches you throw at the dock cleat the better the boat will stay in the slip and not wander off.

If you can't tie good knots, tie lots

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Keep as much water outside the boat as possible

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Regarding sail choice:  Let man propose and God dispose.  Alternatively:  Keep the round side down and steer into the broach.

If it's cold, raining and nasty out there, think about a good book in front of a warm fire.  Or rebuilding the head.  Either one would be more fun.

 

 

 

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point the tiller toward the trouble

 

also when backing up (like into a slip)  dont try to steer with the throttle on. the prop wash wont let the rudder work.  first hit the throttle and go straight.  get some mo, put it in neutral, then steer to your hearts content

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10 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Never follow anyone who draws less than you do.

+1  I had a Santana 23 daggerboard midget ocean racer years ago. In one Hot Rum race reaching back into SD bay I went high (west) before ballast point to keep clear air. Two boat went aground following me not knowing I had the board up and drew about two feet of water!

 

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On 12/8/2017 at 10:23 AM, lasal said:

Something PNW sailors usually know, but East coast sailors often don't, is that in most conditions you really don't need a 7:1 or 8:1 or 10:1 scope on your anchor rode. 3:1 or 4:1 is usually plenty, and then you're not swinging into the neighbors, at least not uninvited.

Recently, I saw a 60' center cockpit with a big sat dome and a CQR anchor, put a 200' pile of chain on the bottom just behind the anchor in 10' of water. Guy sets anchor, walks forward and you hear the windlass clink clink clink paying out chain for two minutes. He bought all that nice chain and wants to get his money's worth.

Ran across a Contessa 32 doing exactly the same thing in two anchorages this summer.  First time it was 20' of water and he had 150' of chain out - he claimed he needed 7 to 1 scope.  I joked to my wife that he must have read that in a sailing book somewhere.  Nobody does that here unless it is blowing a gale.

All the other boats including mine had stern lines to shore but he wanted to swing "so he could leave early in the morning without any hassle".   He asked me to move because I anchored in his enormous circle, and was quite rude about it.  I refused and told him to put a stern line out because that was proper etiquette in a crowded anchorage.   We agreed to disagree.  I put fenders out on the side of my boat just in case. 

Saw the same boat again in my local harbour yelling at a boat anchoring in his once again enormous circle while we were sailing around prior to a Wednesday night race.  As we sailed by I said something like "Dude, you are the problem".

 

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Stern too the shore with ropes ashore  is reseved  for special circumstances...specificly strong offshore winds or very deep deep, unusable  depth profiles

if these conditions are absent avoid stern too or you will ruin a perfectly acceptable swing anchorage 

additionaly ..dont tie to trees.

 

Yacht stern lines  girdle the tree and kill it 

i visit many anchorages were cronic bad behavior has killed every tree allong the shoreline  

in some regions it is against the law

 

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On 12/8/2017 at 12:52 PM, hobot said:

The more hitches you throw at the dock cleat the better the boat will stay in the slip and not wander off.

can't tie as knot, tie a lot ;-)

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11 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Stern too the shore with ropes ashore  is reseved  for special circumstances...specificly strong offshore winds or very deep deep, unusable  depth profiles

if these conditions are absent avoid stern too or you will ruin a perfectly acceptable swing anchorage 

additionaly ..dont tie to trees.

 

 

Ummm. No. Unless you think every crowded anchorage is a special circumstance.  If we did that here in the PNW most anchorages that will safely take ten boats would have only two or three.  Keep in mind that things are different here - the vast majority of our popular anchorages are small and protected from all directions.  There is generally no need to swing.  Everywhere else in the world swinging makes sense.  Until people here figure this out they generally have the attitude you are promoting, meanwhile everyone else just rolls their eyes when they come into an anchorage and try to reserve a ridiculous amount of swinging room.  It is considered very poor etiquette here.

In larger anchorages people will swing, and if the holding is good they'll generally stick to about 3-4:1 scope, 3 if they have chain and 4 for chain + rode, and only go out to 7:1 if a big breeze shows up.  We don't get waves in our anchorages here.  I have never dragged off of 4:1.  I have chosen to go to 7:1 two or three times in 35 years of cruising when a gale blew into an anchorage and it was the middle of the night so we didn't want to move.

Think about the guy with the Contessa.  He essentially had 120' of chain lying on the bottom doing exactly nothing. 

See the picture below.  Every boat in that picture is stern-tied and safe.  How many boats would be there if it was necessary to swing?

Your comment on trees is spot on.  Most of our marine parks have stern tie rings embedded in the rock to avoid having to do that.  Yes, even the marine parks people think you should stern tie.

stripes048.jpg

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Yeah, the stern tie makes so much more room for everyone. Slug, there is drift wood piled everywhere and rings already placed in some anchorages, the trees are ok. It's easy and where there are large tides and currents boats don't swing predictably together in narrow anchorages. Do you really anchor in 50' of water as a rule? You piloting a tanker?

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When trying to figure when to gybe into the bottom mark, wait until the butt end of the windex is pointing at the mark. This will put you roughly on the same angle on the other gybe. Allow for tide if needed. 

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On 12/10/2017 at 5:02 AM, slug zitski said:

Stern too the shore with ropes ashore  is reseved  for special circumstances...specificly strong offshore winds or very deep deep, unusable  depth profiles

if these conditions are absent avoid stern too or you will ruin a perfectly acceptable swing anchorage 

additionaly ..dont tie to trees.

 

Yacht stern lines  girdle the tree and kill it 

i visit many anchorages were cronic bad behavior has killed every tree allong the shoreline  

in some regions it is against the law

 

Interesting. I can see that happening. Not good for the lines, either.

I carry rigging straps (similar to a car towing strap, but wider and longer) for stuff like this. They're much cheaper than mooring lines, stronger, much more resistant to chafe, and if you wrap it around the base of a tree, the wide flat surface would do far less damage. I've used them to tie to cement bridge supports and old timber structures (a railroad bridge and an lumber sawmill, IIRC).

FB- Doug

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52 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Interesting. I can see that happening. Not good for the lines, either.

I carry rigging straps (similar to a car towing strap, but wider and longer) for stuff like this. They're much cheaper than mooring lines, stronger, much more resistant to chafe, and if you wrap it around the base of a tree, the wide flat surface would do far less damage. I've used them to tie to cement bridge supports and old timber structures (a railroad bridge and an lumber sawmill, IIRC).

FB- Doug

Its a lot of work to anchor with lines ashore.  Always a possibilty that your crew punctures  the rib on rocks or falls down while walking on the slimy surface and breaks or cuts something .  Retrieving your stern line when things go bad at night is not fun ...mistakes happen when things are not easy . 

 I seldom go stern too

also Im 3.8 meters deep at rhe rudder...i dont like the rudder being so close to the bottom , particulary in green water with poor visability that prevents me from visualy surveying the area. .    Regardless of draft....All sailing yachts are vulnerable aft .

 Im many areas I avoid  stern too because of rats...those buggers will walk right out on your  shore lines.   Additionaly ...for some reason when another boat sees me stern to in an anchorage they Think its a good idea to also  come over and go stern tooo right next to me.  Sometimes they even attempt to fasten to the same rock crevice or strong point that   Im using .  

The reason  people like an anchorag is the peace , quite and privacy ...not listening to the next door neighbors wind generator or barking dog  

As for anchoring Ive been a full time sailor for 40 years, perhaps 130 or so days a year on anchor .  I feel most secure  when on a swing an horage , well offshore, deep water, , standing watch , prepared to break free,  clear of  other boats  , singlehanded , in a moment notice. 

IMG_7245.JPG

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Rig a couple of your dock lines - one at the bow, one at the stern, preferably opposite side - so that the spliced loop end goes to a cleat on your boat and bitter end is permanently tied off on the piling or dock cleat.   Other lines that need to be tied each time like spring lines can be marked with a sharpie or better a couple turns of whipping thread to mark exactly where they hit the cleat.  Most of the time, this prevents the need for any sort of fine tuning at the dock, except in unusual tide or weather conditions..  It's a fussy pain in the butt to set up, but a kindness to your tired crew who just want to finish de-rigging the boat, get the hell off it and go home or to a post-race beer.  

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On 12/8/2017 at 3:57 PM, SailBlueH2O said:

70's flying a Bahamian 20 seat island hopper...the well used plane of eastern European origin had English translated placards below the OEM signage ....one said...In case of emergency exit through toilet....wish I had taken a photo...

Or this:

DontTouch.jpeg

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5 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Its a lot of work to anchor with lines ashore.  Always a possibilty that your crew punctures  the rib on rocks or falls down while walking on the slimy surface and breaks or cuts something .  Retrieving your stern line when things go bad at night is not fun ...mistakes happen when things are not easy . 

 I seldom go stern too

also Im 3.8 meters deep at rhe rudder...i dont like the rudder being so close to the bottom , particulary in green water with poor visability that prevents me from visualy surveying the area. .    Regardless of draft....All sailing yachts are vulnerable aft .

 Im many areas I avoid  stern too because of rats...those buggers will walk right out on your  shore lines.   Additionaly ...for some reason when another boat sees me stern to in an anchorage they Think its a good idea to also  come over and go stern tooo right next to me.  Sometimes they even attempt to fasten to the same rock crevice or strong point that   Im using .  

The reason  people like an anchorag is the peace , quite and privacy ...not listening to the next door neighbors wind generator or barking dog  

As for anchoring Ive been a full time sailor for 40 years, perhaps 130 or so days a year on anchor .  I feel most secure  when on a swing an horage , well offshore, deep water, , standing watch , prepared to break free,  clear of  other boats  , singlehanded , in a moment notice. 

 

All well and good, these are sound reasons for wanting to swing if you are single-handing.  However, if you are not single-handed and you do that here in the PNW and then bark at people for stern-tying in your swing circle, they will think you are being a complete jerk.  Being single-handed and doing it is slightly forgivable, but people will still think you are behaving like an entitled SOB if you consume all the space in a small anchorage for one person on a boat.  Sharing is something they teach in kindergarten.

Most boats here have a stern line long enough to run it all the way to shore and back, so that retrieving the line in an emergency is just a matter of letting one end go.

3.8 m deep at the rudder means this is a very large boat.  I wouldn't tie stern to single-handed either with that size of boat.  I think it would have been helpful if you had clarified that at the beginning. 

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If you are single-handing on a tiller boat but don't have an autopilot, put a spare turning block at the bow, and beside the tiller on both sides.  Run a line completely around the boat through all the blocks and tie off to the tiller on both sides.  You can now steer from anywhere on the boat, and if you adjust the line tighter can often get enough friction to even sail upwind with a bit of weather helm.  Balancing the sail plan is essential. Gybing downwind even single-handed with a symmetrical kite is quite easy because you can go to the mast and adjust the steering while you are there.

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This is an example of what dash34 is talking about from a waterman (crabbing) boat on the chesapeake:

P1060782-X2.jpg

The mid-ship lever isn't necessary.  You see this a lot on these boats there, but this particular one is at the Maritime Museum in St Michaels, MD.

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

This is an example of what dash34 is talking about from a waterman (crabbing) boat on the chesapeake:

P1060782-X2.jpg

The mid-ship lever isn't necessary.  You see this a lot on these boats there, but this particular one is at the Maritime Museum in St Michaels, MD.

You mean the lever that turns the rudder?  Not necessary, only if you replace with a wheel, or rear steering tiller extension.

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If you look at the picture that I posted there is both a tiller (aft) and a midship lever that acts as a remote tiller.  You don't need the latter, you could just move the tiller-attached rope by hand and use the tiller when driving normally.

 

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This one should be "smack upside the head" obvious......:wacko:

 

 

 

 

 

Don't fall off the boat.

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9 minutes ago, madohe said:

Don't fall off the boat.

Most important of all!

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33 minutes ago, sailronin said:

Most important of all!

Especially when the boat is either moving in midocean, or on the hard.

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On 12/10/2017 at 12:26 AM, slug zitski said:

Deck work...dont  move forward on the lee side....always use the windward

side.bear off, level the boat , for sail handling 

always sail with the mainsail prevented....always 

https://youtu.be/buwPXsA1FWs

 

Do you actually sail?  I haven't seen a preventer rigged on a boat that wasn't on an ocean passage in 40 years.  And then only rarely.

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22 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Do you actually sail?  I haven't seen a preventer rigged on a boat that wasn't on an ocean passage in 40 years.  And then only rarely.

Remember, he is mostly sailing single-handed on apparently a very large boat - rudder draft is 3.8 m.  His comments make more sense in that context.

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5 hours ago, dash34 said:

....      ...

3.8 m deep at the rudder means this is a very large boat.  I wouldn't tie stern to single-handed either with that size of boat.  I think it would have been helpful if you had clarified that at the beginning. 

Around here, we don't have to worry about sharing with people whose boat 3.8 meters deep, aft or forward or anywhere. The closest water that is deep enough for a boat like that is in the middle of the river about 6 or 7 miles down from us.

FB- Doug

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My boat draws 11' (at the keel) and I honestly have no intention of single handing it (or ability).  Even with a preventer. 

Troll.

 

 

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9 hours ago, dash34 said:

All well and good, these are sound reasons for wanting to swing if you are single-handing.  However, if you are not single-handed and you do that here in the PNW and then bark at people for stern-tying in your swing circle, they will think you are being a complete jerk.  Being single-handed and doing it is slightly forgivable, but people will still think you are behaving like an entitled SOB if you consume all the space in a small anchorage for one person on a boat.  Sharing is something they teach in kindergarten.

Most boats here have a stern line long enough to run it all the way to shore and back, so that retrieving the line in an emergency is just a matter of letting one end go.

3.8 m deep at the rudder means this is a very large boat.  I wouldn't tie stern to single-handed either with that size of boat.  I think it would have been helpful if you had clarified that at the beginning. 

On boats you are always singlehanded.... even when you have a full crew......people are  ashore  touring for instance.

This is why you are a cruiser...to check out the region 

anchor watch is typically solo. 

A doubled...continous sternline that you can  let run is very long, perhaps One hunded meters ..not practicle  for most situations. 

Additional the typical routine for stern too is to send the tender ashore with a line, the crew search for a suitable fastening  point , then the crew drags the stern line back to the boat...this is difficult to do with a continious line that is attached to the yacht 

if you cant perform a manuver singlehanded you are not practicing good seamanship

and  I have dumped  and lost many many stern lines into the sea when evacuating .  These lines are lost.  This is the reason I never use floating rope.  Floaters become a  hazard to all boats using  the anchorage .  Sinkers dont

a good methed for handling the stern line is to first...fasten the  stern line to the tender...then flake this  long rope on the tender sole....find a suitable landing point onshore...scramble ashore with the end of the line in your hand ...then give the tender a good push , launching to the tender back into the sea.  Tender Free floating , but attached  to your stern line.  This way the tender floats free of the rocks and surge while you search for a fastening point.  When its time to reboard the tender simply  pull it in by the stern line ....jump aboard...then ...in reverse...haul the line back out to the boat. Best to always keep the outboard running and in nuetral when you perform the manuever. 

Hauling the  rope to the yacht in reverse  keeps the rope clear of the outboard motor as you feed out and reverse thrust is more prescise when pulling a load

 

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2 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Many times you are on a stern line in port because the water depth is Shallow for draft or persistent surge makes the village dock dangerous .

stern too is a valuable technique that should be practiced 

IMG_7279.png

 

 

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Remember, those guys in the PNW have the opposite situation from the Chesapeake.  In Puget Sound, 30 feet from shore could find you in a hundred feet of water.  Stern tying makes more sense there.  Going farther out and trying for 5:1 scope in 200 feet is difficult.

An interesting one is Ayala cove on Angel island.  The moorings come in pairs, and you have to tie the bow to one, and the stern to the matching one.   Great fun to watch people attempt this.  I do it single handed, the trick is a good long stern line (like 150 ft / 50M); hook that first, then manuver to the bow ball. Then adjust.  

 

Another helpful trick that I learned here is anchoring singlehanded from the cockpit (I have a mostly rope rode):

- Rig the rode through a fairlead at the bow, bring back to the cockpit outside everything.  Attach the anchor and pull enough rode back for initial scope. 

- Cruise the anchorage, ending going slowly downwind over your desired spot.  

- At the right spot, toss the anchor and play out the rode as you continue forward. 

- Before it goes tight, snub it off on a stern cleat or primary winch.  The anchor should set on your forward momentum, or you can apply forward power.  

- When the boat is swinging the right direction, cast off the stern cleat so the boat spins and is anchored from the bow.  (you did cleat that too, right?).  I also chuck the kellet at this point, cause it prevents the rope rode from hooking on the keel.  

If you're slick, you can do those last two steps as one move, without using the stern cleat - helps if the downwind leg is a bit of an arc to encourage the correct spin. 

 

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1 hour ago, Kirwan said:

Remember, those guys in the PNW have the opposite situation from the Chesapeake.  In Puget Sound, 30 feet from shore could find you in a hundred feet of water.  Stern tying makes more sense there.  Going farther out and trying for 5:1 scope in 200 feet is difficult.

An interesting one is Ayala cove on Angel island.  The moorings come in pairs, and you have to tie the bow to one, and the stern to the matching one.   Great fun to watch people attempt this.  I do it single handed, the trick is a good long stern line (like 150 ft / 50M); hook that first, then manuver to the bow ball. Then adjust.  

 

Another helpful trick that I learned here is anchoring singlehanded from the cockpit (I have a mostly rope rode):

- Rig the rode through a fairlead at the bow, bring back to the cockpit outside everything.  Attach the anchor and pull enough rode back for initial scope. 

- Cruise the anchorage, ending going slowly downwind over your desired spot.  

- At the right spot, toss the anchor and play out the rode as you continue forward. 

- Before it goes tight, snub it off on a stern cleat or primary winch.  The anchor should set on your forward momentum, or you can apply forward power.  

- When the boat is swinging the right direction, cast off the stern cleat so the boat spins and is anchored from the bow.  (you did cleat that too, right?).  I also chuck the kellet at this point, cause it prevents the rope rode from hooking on the keel.  

If you're slick, you can do those last two steps as one move, without using the stern cleat - helps if the downwind leg is a bit of an arc to encourage the correct spin. 

 

I used to anchor the small keel boats I've owned like that. I wasn't single handed, I just thought it was a better way to anchor since those boats didn't have bow anchor lockers anyway, and walking forward with the anchor and rode, even a light Fortress like I used, seemed silly. Also, backing down to set anchor with a 4hp outboard is just an unsightly routine--leaning off the transom like a moron while you try to hold it down and give it some throttle in it's reverse "position", since there's no reverse gear.

The only thing I would add is that I usually had the main down and flaked on, and sailed in on the jib/genny and would just sheet out all the way when I had the momentum I wanted. If it was really blowing I'd take down the jib too before dropping the hook off the back. Another thing driving that technique was the goal of sailing all weekend without using the outboard if possible. Our first boat was an S20 that we camped on one summer, weekends usually just Saturday night, and I liked to keep the outboard stowed all weekend if possible and not sully the Swan-like reverse transom! :) The next summer we traded for a Capri 25 that had something you could call an interior, that was a fun boat for two, and we kept the same anchoring technique.

 

Slug man: is that your boat? Looks like a Trintella. I know you're a global sailor and all, so how did you come up with your Peyton Manning avatar? And stay off that leward rail dude, you could get killed down there.

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20 hours ago, Moonduster said:

Draft of 3.8m (12.5 feet) at the rudder just doesn't pass the stink test. 

Hmmm.  This was a handful of a boat, but not sure that it even meets the 3.8m at the rudder criteria!

 

20161206_115210.jpg

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19 hours ago, slug zitski said:

 Many times you are on a stern line in port because the water depth is Shallow for draft or persistent surge makes the village dock dangerous .

stern too is a valuable technique that should be practiced 

I thought you didn't like rats boarding your boat from the stern "ropes". I suppose the village rats are better mannered than the country rats found on wild anchrages, so OK.

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20 hours ago, slug zitski said:

 

 

 

 

if you cant perform a manuver singlehanded you are not practicing good seamanship

and  I have dumped  and lost many many stern lines into the sea when evacuating .  These lines are lost.  This is the reason I never use floating rope.  Floaters become a  hazard to all boats using  the anchorage .  Sinkers dont

 

 

 

Dog, I mean Slug, are you 007?

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56 minutes ago, lasal said:

Dog, I mean Slug, are you 007?

I hope I don't follow him into an anchorage around here. 100 m from shore? We're not anchoring on the continental shelf.

 

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On 12/9/2017 at 8:41 AM, some dude said:

If you can't tie good knots, tie lots

People use this one all the time. But if you can't tie knots learn, or get someone to help. Trying t fix a tangle of knots in a situation is a great way to think lesser of someone who was trying to help. Keep a knife handy.

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