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pacice

Yacht Club Safety Review

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I am heading up a group that is reviewing the safety aspect of our yacht clubs keeler racing. Most of our racing is either Wednesday night racing within the harbour, plus a number of overnight coastal races. We also have a singlehanded series.

While we follow the National Federation's safety guidelines, we are wanting to see if we can do things better.

I would appreciate any comments or suggestions as to what other clubs are doing in regard to safety inspections, and requirements for yachts, singlehanded and crewed racing.

Thanks in advance.

 

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Simple to do.

Disregard every national federation guideline.

Under no circumstance allow any administrator on any review panel.

Do not specify any safety equipment ever.

Under no circumstances do inspections or require inspections.

Yacht are only required carry that equipment mandated by local law.

You only need one rule.

The master will ensure that the vessel is suitable for the voyage to be undertaken and that it is equipped and crewed to undertake such voyage.

Otherwise known in some jurisdiction as the "Primary Safety Obligation".

A master gets it wrong and the local authority will prosecute on that basis.

Do not make a rod for the backs of owners or your club.

You mandate you must ensure compliance and you fail it is your fault.

 

 

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Don't worry about life jackets or any of that crap- the biggest issue is to develop  policy's for on board videos for mixed gender crews. 

You must protect all the snowflakes in your club from them selves. According to those posting in the witty thread, as soon as a group of US sailors are on a boat with a lone girl their thoughts turn to rape. Probobly safer for all just to close the club and take up golf. 

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No doubt you will get your usual yacht club fuckwits who will not understand and want to mandate everything in a inch of it life.

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Beware trying to micromanage the safety aspects of sailboat racing sanctioned by your yacht club.  You haven't mentioned which country you're in, but in the US the last few years there's been several high profile racing tragedies  where everybody and anybody was sued, including the host yacht club.

NOSA Agean Tragedy

Consult with your club insurers concerning liability exposure if you're contemplating going beyond the usual Sailing Instruction caveats concerning USCG requirements,  race category equipment required, and the all important:

  • 13. DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY
  • Competitors participate in this Race entirely at their own risk. See RRS rule 4 (Decision to Race). The Organizing Authority will not accept liability for damage or personal injury or death sustained in conjunction with, prior to, during, or after this race.

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The more responsibility you take on, the more responsibility you take on. Be careful what you wish for. 

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On last Wednesday, my yacht club set what I'd consider a dangerous precedence. 

During the twilight race one of the boats had a MOB and after the race the guy was presented with a six pack of beer.

With 36C forecast for the next twilight ands summer's only just started, I suspect we'll be having a few more MOB's.

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Does the club have a junior program? If so, make sure the coach boats have prop guards installed! Or better yet, sell them and buy jet boats.

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43 minutes ago, hoppy said:

On last Wednesday, my yacht club set what I'd consider a dangerous precedence. 

During the twilight race one of the boats had a MOB and after the race the guy was presented with a six pack of beer.

With 36C forecast for the next twilight ands summer's only just started, I suspect we'll be having a few more MOB's.

'Person' overboard mate. We can't be too careful with our words these days.

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Mid strength beer only until the top mark.  Counciling for all members who are offended and a safe place in the bar for women. 

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When it comes to fatalities at clubs, using my memory, not pulling data, I would rank them as:

1. Drowning in races.

2. Electrocutions from either overhead wires meeting with masts, no GFI on dock wiring, and/or bad wiring on boats causing swimmers to die.

3. Choking on food in the dining room.

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You need to sail at the Lota fishing and Fighting Club.

Zero drowning but three as a result of injuries sustained in beer can race collisions.

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1 hour ago, lydia said:

You need to sail at the Lota fishing and Fighting Club.

Zero drowning but three as a result of injuries sustained in beer can race collisions.

A detached Retina, a  Gold Medalist in a headlock, a few strained ligaments, a bit of bark off and a few egos dented in  some of the clubs great bar fights and DG split his chin open doing a bar slide in Gladstone. But the biggest casualty of all has been the truth. 

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If you are going to mandate safety equipment remember the mouth guards.

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As noted earlier it's the skippers' sole and inescapable responsibility to ensure safety of boat and crew. Leave it there mate or you're headed for big trouble !

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Onerous safety requirements will just piss off members causing some to move to less uptight clubs.

My club has started strictly enforcing crew lists as part of the safety requirements (to know how many onboard when you sink) causing a couple of yachts to be disqualified when the forms were not signed (I got a special mention when "officially" racing solo but clearly was not alone). 

I assume that the OP is a Kiwi (are they the only ones who use the term "keeler"?) and I'm guessing they already have nanny state safety rules similar to or even worse than we have in Aus. Stick to your National Federation's safety guidelines and leave the owners alone, unless there is something unique about your location.

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All women crew members should wear hijab unless there is an American male onboard, then the women should wear a burka.

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2 hours ago, LB 15 said:

'Person' overboard mate. We can't be too careful with our words these days.

Are you sure "person" is even acceptable? If sex is not binary these days, supposedly, what about species?

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3 minutes ago, hoppy said:

Are you sure "person" is even acceptable? If sex is not binary these days, supposedly, what about species?

Should the report mention ethnic origin? They might pull the wrong body out of the water otherwise.

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4 minutes ago, hoppy said:

All women crew members should wear hijab unless there is an American male onboard, then the women should wear a burka.

Further to that, the conversations onboard should be strictly restricted to sailing in the current race as any social chit chat could make American men feel rapey regardless on whether there are female crew onboard. Your safety committee should however issue a alternative sailing terms dictionary replacing terms such as ahead, topside, aft, and any other sailing term that could get misunderstood. 

 

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10 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Should the report mention ethnic origin? They might pull the wrong body out of the water otherwise.

Especially if the racing is in the USA and it's the police performing the rescue. They can use that information to best determine which rescue helicopter to send.

 

Blacks, Mexicans and Australian women in pyjamas 

ah64-apache.jpg

 

Whites2b0a0f32b90fce4ba618c3393370a075.jpg

 

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4 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Don't worry about life jackets or any of that crap- the biggest issue is to develop  policy's for on board videos for mixed gender crews. 

You must protect all the snowflakes in your club from them selves. According to those posting in the witty thread, as soon as a group of US sailors are on a boat with a lone girl their thoughts turn to rape. Probobly safer for all just to close the club and take up golf. 

better make that single-sex golf.. or there may be a mannequin hand and an electric shaver involved.

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The safety committee at our club does not concern itself with what the rules or regulations say.  Our safety committee works out what has to be done when something bad happens. Lives and safety matter more than rules.  If an accident occurs out on the water, does someone issue a general radio distress call or do they contact the club manager so he can call 911 (Emergency services)?  Is the yacht club dock the quickest destination for the boat carrying the victim, or is there another place that might be quicker?  Seconds count.  The ambulance needs to be directed to the right place. People need to know what to do.

Our safety committee has developed a series of protocols based on different possible problems.   They test them by holding drills that involve yacht club staff (sailing instructors, launch drivers, managers), local police (two towns were included in our latest session, since we are near the border), club members and the Coast Guard.  This past summer the drill scenario was a squall that capsized many boats at a regatta, leaving three sailors unaccounted for and boats drifting into the next town.  A search pattern had to be initiated for one of the victims.  (The others were found with their boats.)  All the victims needed to have their medical conditions checked by EMT crews, and everyone had to communicate in order to know what was going on and what needed to be done. Afterwards there is a debriefing where everyone involved can comment on what worked well and what could be done better. We try to improve every year.  Having protocols in place has been worthwhile.  A club member walking along the beach  one chilly day saw a capsized kayak, called the club, and a boat was sent out to investigate. The kayaker was unconscious by the time he was pulled from the water. Having the ambulance meet them at the closest point to the harbor entrance saved precious minutes in saving the hypothermic victim's life.  

Enforcing rules and regulations is not a club's job.  Let the police and Coast Guard do that.  A club is for ensuring people have a good time in a safe place. Perhaps calling for certain equipment or adhering to certain standards for your longer races  would help make them safer places, but as noted above, each skipper needs to make sure his vessel is equipped and his crew prepared for the intended voyage. Things can happen that overcome any preparation or equipment , however.  That is what the Safety Committee needs to prepare for. .  

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Good post Paul - one would have hopped that all clubs have Safety Management systems in place already. If they don't and you are on the board - put all your assets in your wife's name and bring your toothbrush and a tube of arse lube with you to your next court appearance.

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Thanks everyone - Lots of great advice up to the usual standard we have all come to expect. Lots of fun. and Yes, I am a kiwi, and it's summer time.

On a serious note, the reason we are looking at this is a sailor drowned after entering one of our singlehanded races, but he pulled out due to a lack of wind and went fishing. It seems he fall over the side when raising his mainsail. he was found facedown in the water, and his boat doing slow circles in the busy harbour entrance. 

Nationally there are no special safety requirements for single handed sailing, but some local clubs require singlehanders to carry on their person during the races in this series the means to self-initiate a 3 rd party rescue in the event that I become unable to sail singlehanded or fall overboard.

Also the biggest issue with a Man (or person) overboard, is the person in the water generally cannot communicate with the boat. The boat is generally easier to see from the water, than the person from the boat, and if the person in the water could direct the boat back to them, it would save all the time spent searching. Given the low cost of waterproof handheld VHF radios,  carrying on on your person could be the key to saving your life.

 

 

 

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Also also have the nanny state Health and Safety laws, and the Govt agencies will prosecute where possible.

I fully support the Skipper has full responsibility for what happens on the boat. 

But we can all learn from other mistakes, and we can make recommendations to the  skippers and yacht owners.

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1 hour ago, pacice said:

Thanks everyone - Lots of great advice up to the usual standard we have all come to expect. Lots of fun. and Yes, I am a kiwi, and it's summer time.

On a serious note, the reason we are looking at this is a sailor drowned after entering one of our singlehanded races, but he pulled out due to a lack of wind and went fishing. It seems he fall over the side when raising his mainsail. he was found facedown in the water, and his boat doing slow circles in the busy harbour entrance. 

Nationally there are no special safety requirements for single handed sailing, but some local clubs require singlehanders to carry on their person during the races in this series the means to self-initiate a 3 rd party rescue in the event that I become unable to sail singlehanded or fall overboard.

Also the biggest issue with a Man (or person) overboard, is the person in the water generally cannot communicate with the boat. The boat is generally easier to see from the water, than the person from the boat, and if the person in the water could direct the boat back to them, it would save all the time spent searching. Given the low cost of waterproof handheld VHF radios,  carrying on on your person could be the key to saving your life.

I would imagine that no matter what rules you impose, they would not have helped that guy as once he pulled out of the race he would have done his own thing.

Whilst I've never raced solo, I have soloed my yacht around Greece for several thousand NM in all sorts of conditions, up to 50 knts. As conditions got heavier I'd generally act more safety conscious, putting on my lifejacket, mainly for the harness, and using the harness on deck. Lighter conditions I did not bother with the LJ. My LJ was originally fitted with a PLB but I replaced it with an AIS MOB.

I would not appreciate rules telling me when I should wear it. 

At the most, I think any club should only recommend safety gear beyond the legal requirements.

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Clubs should never recommend anything beyond the standard equipment as it creates a standard (some dip shit lawyer will hold up later as the minimum equipment you needed)

 

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1 hour ago, lydia said:

Clubs should never recommend anything beyond the standard equipment as it creates a standard (some dip shit lawyer will hold up later as the minimum equipment you needed)

 

Actually, if the club takes the position that it takes the responsibility to mandate X, then if something happens where X makes a situation worse OR someone died or was injured when Y could have prevented it, a scum sucking lawyer might sue the club because they did not mandate Y. 

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I think that's the basis for Lydia's approach ie. stick to the legislation. 

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On 12/10/2017 at 10:40 PM, pacice said:

Also also have the nanny state Health and Safety laws, and the Govt agencies will prosecute where possible.

I fully support the Skipper has full responsibility for what happens on the boat. 

But we can all learn from other mistakes, and we can make recommendations to the  skippers and yacht owners.

And make yourself conveniently liable when you make those recommendations.

 

Lawyer: "If you made this recommendation knowing it would make this person safer, why didn't you enforce it?"

You: "It was a recommendation"

Lawyer: "So you knew it would save lives but didn't make it a requirement?"

You: "It was a recommendation"

Lawyer: "So how often did you reinforce this recommendation that should have been a requirement?  Before each race?  Did you have all the sailors on the boat sign something saying they understood it?  You really didn't care, did you?"

Seriously.  Sounds like you're not taking the very good advice of stay the fuck away from this safety shit.  You WILL be responsible if someone gets hurt.  I was worried that I was going to get sued when someone tripped walking to their car after the race.  Uneven pavement and all that.

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It's called liability insurance. Every club has it and I'm pretty close to certain that a good percentage(read %99plus)of the policies can withstand having safety recommendations in place and a member not following them. Failure of a skipper or crew to comply with recommended safety practices does not automatically equal a slam dunk lawsuit(and as Lydia mentioned, it will usually revert back to jurisdiction).

This is why you see signs like 'No lifeguard on duty'.

3 2 1...here come the precedent hounds...to show me otherwise. 

The only safety consideration I can think of at my own club that has been instituted in recent years is my club saving its own ass against certain potential liability by requiring onboard up to date insurance. I got the memo a few years ago, but so far haven't had an inspection from the safety office. I guess they're happy to have pre-cleared their liability. Now I can sleep better.

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At our club, one of the members and my best client fell off of his boat at the dock in May in cold water and he didn’t think to swim to the powerboat next to him and climb the swim ladder. Instead he spent 30 minutes alone trying to climb the 5’ up the bulkhead, severely injuring his arm in the process. He said “Fuck an operation, I’d lose the racing season!” He sailed the Wed. night Series and won. Just can’t jerk it anymore. And he’s 77!!!

We have several ladders around the docks for this exact situation. It was discussed at the next meeting and one guy wants bright red warning signs all over the property showing their locations. Needless to say, the swimmer knew about the ladders and just hit shock mode. He’s a super competitive guy and he couldn’t think the easy solution once out of his element. 

In October we had a kid’s regatta- lasers and 470’s. Honking out of the west at 25mph and I saw a laser flip.I was driving by the local beach about a half mile from our club. I called immediately and told them to get a boat to it.  By the time they got to her with a club boat, she had been flipped for about 20 minutes and was completely drained of energy trying to right the laser by the time they got there. None of the several committee boats on the coursesaw that she was in trouble or responded to vhf communication from the club base and I want to beat a couple of them up for that. Had I not seen her I think she would have been totally f’d.

Also, thanks to micromanagement, there are signs all over our club designating “Club property” drinking zones you can’t violate that make me scratch my head and last week they put up “No Pets Allowed On Property” signs. I know my Boston Terrier Sonny has more class than the members that pushed that through and he’s been a sweet mascot there 12 years-longer than most members I know...and a couple of them on the board have dogs they walk every day to the property since they live nearby. The white collars have been bitching about my dog for some reason because he was there a lot while I was repairing boats last summer. I won’t repair any more boats at the club or for members...It was aimed at me and when I did the math- 50 Sunday Chartroom sessions at $25 plus tip=$1,500, 30 summer afternoon pool drink purchases for the wife and her friends at $40 plus tip=$1,400 and and 10 Friday night Galley’s  where I’dshow up for a drink with friends$50 plus tip=$500. I’ve saved $3,400 this year just being myself and refusing to play underdog to a bunch of blue collar club snobs.( Though they called me last month and asked for a laser hull since they borrowed one for a regatta and the visiting kids ruined it. I donated the hull, I hope they think about that.)

Rules suck and I don’t generally follow them. Not a team player unless I’m crewing, then we’re going to do very well and I’ll do my job and anyone else’s if they’re too slow because I hate to lose because of bad crew work.

I think our club is opening themselves up to liability if they post too many signs and if they don’t post too many signs. People get really drunk and really stupid at yacht clubs and I’m just glad they didn’t ask me to the Board of Governors. I’d ruin their fun.

So many stupid rules to break to piss off the lemmings...from the guy with the largest sailboat and the also the fastest sailboat; I refuse to race there anymore. 

 

 

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Screw the lawyers. When someone dies at your club, the emotional toll, the bad publicity (it can't be good publicity), the funeral, etc. casts such a pall over things.

Is the club really somehow bad by adding ladders around their docks?

Changing out plain circuit breakers with GFI Circuit breakers anywhere around water?

Giving CPR and First Aid seminars (including Heimlich) to members and staff, so if someone chokes on a meal, they don't die?

Be good people, be good.

 

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On 12/10/2017 at 6:34 PM, hoppy said:

On last Wednesday, my yacht club set what I'd consider a dangerous precedence. 

Precedent

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2 hours ago, pkitching said:

 life jacket mandatory is a bad idea?

that's a terrible nanny state imposition on the captain and crew and the rule would not have impacted the man who drowned as he had pulled out of the race and therefore was not bound by the club rules. 

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3 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Precedent

oops

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 Understand NZ has some sort of insurance scheme run by the Government that abolishes  liability for accidents. Apparently you don't get sued and the scheme pays out for all accidental injuries and death where there is financial loss. Seems like a Ph.D in self guilt and nanny statedness to generate a safety review ?. Self policing, especially by committees is the worst kind . As  noted clubs should be places of fun and cameradie and rules and regulations  left to the agencies.

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31 minutes ago, armchairadmiral said:

  . As  noted clubs should be places of fun and cameradie and rules and regulations  left to the agencies.

Yes Government agencies are experts in the risks associated with sailing. Here in Oz the regulators leave it up to the operator to decide what is safe. It an adult approach.

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5 hours ago, armchairadmiral said:

Understand NZ has some sort of insurance scheme run by the Government that abolishes  liability for accidents. Apparently you don't get sued and the scheme pays out for all accidental injuries and death where there is financial loss. Seems like a Ph.D in self guilt and nanny statedness to generate a safety review ?. Self policing, especially by committees is the worst kind . As  noted clubs should be places of fun and cameradie and rules and regulations  left to the agencies.

You've never been to NZ have you. It's the most "do the fuck what you want" country I've ever been to.

Get pushed down a hill in a giant plastic hamster ball? Sure!

Try "street luge" down a bigger mountain in a 3 wheeled device with brakes and stability that are a bit rudimentary enough that I dumped one on the second curve? Why not!

Bungee jumping? Where do you think it was invented.

I could go on but I think you get the drift. The rules there have promoted a culture of risk taking.

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7 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Yes Government agencies are experts in the risks associated with sailing. Here in Oz the regulators leave it up to the operator to decide what is safe. It an adult approach.

That sounds very unAustralian (these days) 

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Clubs organize races, write the SI's, determine whether or not to start a race based on the conditions, and all the other responsibilities that goes along with that. All of these things leave them open to liability whether they mandate safety equipment inspections or not. There's no way you can organize a race and avoid this.  When people get hurt or killed the lawyers are going to look for the deep pockets, not the $100,000 boaters liability policy you have. 

If a club chooses to have safety inspections or require certain equipment it should be for practical reasons. At my club for instance, the requirements for inshore races are very small because the danger is quite limited. We are only required to have life jackets on board (which is the law anyway) and that's about it. On the other hand, for the offshore races inspections and equipment requirements are pretty strict.

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Some people just don't get it.

So I can take paying passengers with no water experience up the coast with far less equipment on a powered charter boat than what I am required to carry with an experienced and trained volunteer crew in a race in a boat that is far better certified and engineered than almost all charter boats whether power or sail.

Why?

Because some dip shit no experience do-gooder yachting administrator thinks you have to mandate things to make it safer.

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This thread has gone off course (what's new?). All of these threats of liability is not the question asked.  A safety committee was formed and they are wondering what they could do to assure that everyone comes back home alive after a day of racing?

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Here is the example I use with the example I use when engaging with arsehats to demonstrate the problem.

Part of the year we sail Etchells south of 43' south in a large river fed by snow melt.

Water temp is quite low and it gets quite windy.

Pretty much everyone falls out of an Etchell at sometime.

There is no requirement in the Sailing Australia safety prescriptions to carry a thermal blanket in case of an immersion event. 

My requirement by law as master  is to carry equipment appropriate for the voyage.

Obviously, a thermal blanket is cheap, easy to carry and a potential lifesaver.

I believe I satisfy my requirement at law in this regard by carrying a thermal blanket.

The special prescriptions fail on a number of levels.

Firstly one size does not fit all. Sail north of 26' S and there is unlikely to be a need.

There are now out of touch with the requirements at law in any event.

Most importantly, they are not providing a standard which a owner can point to in their defence.

In short at least in Australia, the standing of the master has changed withy more responsibility put on the master and their judgment.

Mandatory prescriptions in part have become irrelevant and now add nothing but expense.

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

This thread has gone off course (what's new?). All of these threats of liability is not the question asked.  A safety committee was formed and they are wondering what they could do to assure that everyone comes back home alive after a day of racing?

By all means have informed discussions about what is appropriate equipment but do not mandate it.

Leave it to the owners.

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18 minutes ago, lydia said:

Some people just don't get it.

So I can take paying passengers with no water experience up the coast with far less equipment on a powered charter boat than what I am required to carry with an experienced and trained volunteer crew in a race in a boat that is far better certified and engineered than almost all charter boats whether power or sail.

Why?

Because some dip shit no experience do-gooder yachting administrator thinks you have to mandate things to make it safer.

You would have to have a USCG license and USCG certificate on the vessel to have those paying passengers on board (in the US anyway). Not so with the volunteer crew.

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Mark Set, 

A $100,000 boaters policy would only at best cover collision and would be a drop in the bucket for personal liability insurance. In fact, I'm not sure you could buy one that low. A personal liability insurance policy might cover a range from 1-3 million.

As an aside, I've noticed a couple of times in this thread, which you've mentioned as well, is a differentiation between inshore and offshore. There is definitely a different risk factor, but two of the most dangerous things in sailing is getting hit by a boom and falling down a companionway. Neither of these incidents care where the boat is when they happen.

The fact that a club organizes a fleet race or a dinner party is immaterial to the over-all liability they will carry. If you get an ambulance chasing lawyer on your case due to either a dinner table injury or a fleet racing injury, your policy is expected to absorb this eventuality so that you can carry on with the club's acitivities with a reasonable piece of mind. Yes the clubs liability insurance will be bigger than the single boaters, and will also include things like fire, flood, loss of business as well, but I'm not sure it changes the path to the payout all that much in the case of volunteers and the like working at the behest of the club. That will revert to the club. If there is any grey area, expect that both the private boaters policy AND the clubs policy to kick in once both party's are being sued.

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1Here is the opposite example.

So for a modern 38 ft, 5000 kg  boat with high lift foils, the safety prescriptions allow me to carry a 12 pound alloy with 10m of light chain and 50m of 12mm warp.

So I am street legal.

In practice however, in anything over 25 knots this anchor gear is pointless. totally inadequate.

With high lift foils there is no chance to keep this gear on the bottom.

Experience tells me that if want to stay in the one spot and it gets really fresh, I should carry a 40 pound CQR or similar, 20 metres of heavy chain and at least 20mm warp (heavy warp tends to stop the boat sailing at anchor).

So what is my obligation as a master?

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9 minutes ago, Mark Set (BIMBO Local 713) said:

You would have to have a USCG license and USCG certificate on the vessel to have those paying passengers on board (in the US anyway). Not so with the volunteer crew.

MS, Same is OZ, and I take your point however, the issue was identifying was the standard of the equipment not the licencing.

Cheers

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3 minutes ago, fufkin said:

Mark Set, 

A $100,000 boaters policy would only at best cover collision and would be a drop in the bucket for personal liability insurance. In fact, I'm not sure you could buy one that low. A personal liability insurance policy might cover a range from 1-3 million.

 

I'm well aware that it's not an adequate limit, thats why they would go after the clubs limit. $300k is a more typical requirement around here, but ive seen lower. 

 

As for getting hit by a boom or falling down, the minute they start requiring helmets you can count me out!

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Mark Set, 

I wouldn't wear a helmet either. I must admit, I only mandate life jackets on my own boat for under 10 age.

But be rest assured, there will be a clipboard warrior out there who will mistake the helmet for the real solution when in fact the only solution is to teach good practice, good seamanship and good awareness.

The ironic thing is a don't think a helmet's gonna do a lick of good beyond a certain size boom.

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8 minutes ago, fufkin said:

The ironic thing is a don't think a helmet's gonna do a lick of good beyond a certain size boom.

Adgreede!  Withe biggere boomes helmets juste goinig protectte the heade untille you fishe it oute the watere.

:)

 

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We have safety ladders out the wazoo - at the end of every finger dock. 

And our basin committee has banned swimming in the marina due to risk of stray electric (it's fresh water). Our region has had three stray electric fatalities in the recent past, and people are nervous. 

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34 minutes ago, AJ Oliver said:

We have safety ladders out the wazoo - at the end of every finger dock. 

And our basin committee has banned swimming in the marina due to risk of stray electric (it's fresh water). Our region has had three stray electric fatalities in the recent past, and people are nervous. 

Is that what they mean by cold water shock?

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A point i have made in these discussions is that safety equipment auditing is about fairness as much as safety. If you leave safety equipment completely up to the owner, some (perhaps many) will take none and then when a fatality occurs, the authorities will come in with a big stick. Self policing is what the sport should do. They just need to stop getting advice from the CYCA -the club that has had more fatalities in its events than the rest of the countries offshore yacht clubs combined. As Lydia has pointed out there is no one size fits all in a vast brown land that stretches from 11 degrees south to 43 and a half degrees south. 

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5 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Is that what they mean by cold water shock?

No, not at all . . it is this . . http://www.barrieyachtclub.com/shocking-truth-about-electric-current-near-boats

Note that it is mostly a fresh water issue, but very real for us on the Sweetwater Seas

I do not always agree with our (non-profit volunteer) basin committee, but get it that they are doing the best that they can. 

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