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plywoodboy

Ian Farrier

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One of my best mates has just left us, things will never be the same.

This is just in from NZ GM Rob Densem, no cause has been established yet.

Peter H

 

Hi Peter,

It is with a heavy heart that I tell you Ian Farrier passed away in San Francisco on his way back from the USA yesterday.

We are in deep shock as we come to terms with the huge loss of our captain, and our focus is on Ian’s immediate family and the Farrier Marine team. 

Ian was a visionary, a multihull genius, an all-round nice guy who leaves behind a huge legacy to the sailing world.

Farrier Marine Limited is a strong business with a three year order book for the revolutionary F-22 sailboat. Despite dealing with our grief, it is very much ‘business as usual’ at the factory today. It is our job now to carry on the Farrier legacy and ensure his vision is carried out.

Regards

Rob

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Ah bugger!  We were working on a set of old Farrier 18 sails just today and talking about how clever he was  :(

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I first met Ian Farrier nearly 40 years ago at the Brisbane Boat Show where he was exhibiting a weird looking boat with flapping wings ! Caught my attention immediately and saved me from  becoming a monohull sailor !

At the ripe old age of about 23 I started building a Trailertri 680 which was effectively the start of my boat building career .

Not sure whether I should blame or thank Ian for this but it lead me to a life of multihull building and a long association with one of the worlds most dedicated, driven and passionate Multihull designers.

I later worked with Ian for over 15 years at both Ostac to Corsair Marine and you always knew what he thought about an issue, together we built some great boats!

We did not always agree on everything but I always had great respect for his work ethic and ability to put together a great design .

As others have said Ian was a nice guy , always willing to help anyone who asked , the world will be a poorer place without him .

RIP Ian , you made your mark on the world and you impacted thousands of lives with your great boats that have bought joy to sailors the world over !

 

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Big shock seems like he was one of those people who would live forever,

RIP  to a legend and thanks for the two Farriers I have built and owned and the great moments sailing them, his legacy is spread around the world.

Evil Gnome

5a2e1797344da_EvilGnomeWangi.thumb.jpg.0bee1afb0d2fc69dd694c143114bcfa6.jpg

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It was like a gut shot when I noticed the headline.  I cant believe it.  His presence on the forums helping complete strangers and noobs with questions about his wonderful designs made me feel like he was a friend, mentor and personal advisor.  I am so glad I found my way to my Corsair 31.  I am thankful to him every time I go out.  RIP good man.

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Truly a sad day.

As everybody already said, nice guy and a multihull genius.

I've have the plesure to own and sail F22r. Thank you Ian!

/Joakim

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Thank you Ian for your time, help and at times, great patience. Ive now only just realised how much i took it for granted that you would be here forever to answer all my questions. Like the guys from Nacra, You always made everyone feel welcome in the multihull world, i shall do you proud with all we discussed!!!

R.I.P. old mate

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The world is a smaller place.

When the F-boats first came to the Miami Boat Show, I stood there and watched their video over and over and over again. Genius. Looked at what was possible and decided it wasn't enough and changed the world.

I hoped to one day own one of those boats and eventually did.

spinrun162.jpg

My wife hated it and it got sent to Sweden. Now I want an F-24.

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Sorry to hear it. Sympathy to his friend and family. Can't think of anyone who introduced more people to true performance cruising multihulls. Hope the business survives. Realizing I don't even know anyone there other than Ian. He was "da-man!" So sad...

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Wow. Just got home after a day on the road and heard the news. 

It will be with a heavy heart that I take my F22 out in two days time - until I sheet on. The magic will appear and I'll remember him forever. Great designer and interested in his boats long after they were built. He was even helping me with an issue on my plan built boat a few weeks ago. 

Fair winds. 

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Wow, such a loss.  So sad to hear that, and condolences to friends and family.  I don't think I've read a bad thing about any of his designs.

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This is very sad- he was(is) an inspiration to me...

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Geez, never saw that coming, one of the greats, at least he’s in good company. 

 

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Shocking news!  The multihull world indeed has lost a GIANT!!!

 

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I sailed with a friend who owned an F-27 and then an F-31. What genius in all aspects of design from folding for trailering to speed on the water. The 31 hummed like an aeolian harp when it got to speed which reached 17 knots. Amazing designer and a great loss.

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What a terrible loss.   It would have been a very long time before I got on a trimaran were it not for Ian's brilliant designs.  He brought multihull sailing with speed and comfort to the masses and leaves a great legacy.

 

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My condolences to the Family and Friends of the Great Ian Farrier. He was one of the most patient, kind and brilliant people in the industry. I hope his new F22 can still make it to the USA in great numbers. If so, it will be a fitting tribute to a great man!

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First Bruce Brown and now Ian Farrier! Two of the most influential guys to me ever. I hope they are sailing away together on a sweet little trimaran to sailing and surfing paradise.

     I remember well when Bruce Brown would come to Woodrow Wilson High school from which he had graduated 17 years ahead of me and do a motivational speech and a showing of 'Endless Summer' for each successive class. I came home all exciting about his appearance at the school and my Dad asked, 'Who?'

     One of my friends had a copy of Endless Summer that I borrowed to show my Dad and when it was over he wondered just what on earth the educators at the school were thinking to make Bruce a 'motivational' speaker! 

    Dad later started sending me study plans for Jim Brown's homebuilt plywood trimarans which fit right in with the inspiration I got from Bruce's films and I later found Ian's further development of the early folding ama system that Jim had pioneered. Somehow those three answered a lot of questions for me. Dad, not so much...

I've raced a few F-Boats and Farriers and they never cease to amaze me and are a tribute to Ian. Just wish I could afford one...

My little bargain tri Brown SeaClipper 28.

 

SeaClipper28.jpg

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This one is for you Ian

You are going to live on, every time I step on my boat. Thank You and condolences to the family  

great race results.jpg

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Damn. One of those unexpected, sad gut punches that come out of nowhere. Ian responded personally to every set of questions I ever emailed him about my F-27, in spite of having answered those same questions hundreds of times before, I'm sure.

He read one of my posts on the old Yahoo! forum and encouraged me to turn it into a full article. I did, it got published in the old Multihulls Mag, Ian noticed and sent me a congratulations email. Meanwhile he was designing the F-22 and, no doubt, answering dozens of other emails from other excited F-boaters.

Some of the best times in my life have been on our F-27. Our best to his family, friends, and the entire team at Farrier Marine.

f-27-spinnaker.jpg

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F85SR.thumb.jpg.714b62d016d15715032dc4ca8fe4f3af.jpg

I'm still building one of his designs. The building book that accompanied the drawings makes building easy and even though he was very busy he was very approachable and very quick to answer any questions. His efforts made it possible for many people to build a high performance multihull by just following the book. My thoughts go out to his family and friends.

Thanks Ian. You will be missed.

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A few years back I brought a Tri Tramp whichwas in very bad condition.Ian returned my call and spent an hour telling me how to fix the various broken parts. It was extroardinary for him to go to that trouble regarding a boat he built thirty years previously. He was one in a million.

thanks Ian you are a legend

Bottman

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21 minutes ago, DaveK said:

So whats gonna happen to Farrier Marine?

Given the GM is invested in the CO financially am picking his statement business as usual is the answer. Multihulls direct are more than capable to continue also.

A sad day for Multihull design in general, my condolences to Ians family and staff.

Tony Ellen 

Sweden 

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I remember sitting right as far back as I could in a 31-1D doing the Round Britain 2-handed race in 2010 with boom down, sail off, mast straightened and warps and tires ready to launch.  It was 45kts and we were doing 17kts down the front of the swells with a pitchpole right up the front of the brain.  When the daggerboard is partly in the water, the rudder's out (as was most of the rest of the boat), you're in the hands of the designer.  Ian kept us alive.

What more can I say other than we'll miss you and Thanks!

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3 hours ago, charliemagee said:

Ian responded personally to every set of questions I ever emailed him about my F-27, in spite of having answered those same questions hundreds of times before, I'm sure.

I was one of the hundreds, either before or after you. He had time to talk about a boat that had been sold many years before, to a guy who wasn't buying a boat or a design from him. He was also irritated that I found black, stinky balsa soup in places it should not have been on #162.

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Ian Farrier RIP

The words leapt off the  phone. It took 3 or 4 seconds before my mind could process it. Wait, what? He can't....
 
Crushed.  There are no words, there are no words...
 

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He also showed the same helpful nature to us with some of his oldest designs like my TT720 as he did for those with some of his newest like my mates F85sr.

I tip my hat to his design ever time we go out sailing. His legacy is assured thru the appreciation we all have for our boats.

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I saw a FB post about this news and I refused to look further, hoping it was a hoax.  Alas, it appears to be true.  I don't think there's been a time when I've stepped on my boat or somebody else's F and didn't have the thought about what a magical creation these vessels are.  That Ian was always close by on the F-Boat group or here, chiming in and joining in the discussions, agreeing and disagreeing, offering help when asked, and still creating, made it all the more special.  What a giant influence and now sadly, a giant loss.  Condolences to his family, to Farrier Marine, and to all the F-Boat community.  Sail on, Ian, your presence is with us whenever we sheet in and feel your creations come alive.

 

large_608.jpg.a4953681c8833537f7a9508baea228af.jpglarge.DYKM7414.JPG.4601499f58ce640d8716b4877321d070.JPG

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Fair winds, Ian. Here's hoping you are off to a grand adventure.

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Cheers to Ian Farrier, the man behind the greatest boat we ever owned.

They say the two best days days you own a boat are the day you buy it and the day you sell it.

With our F24 every can was the best day of all the boats we ever owned and the day we sold it was a day we have regretted strongly for years, not a day goes when my father and I reminisce of the years we had the old girl.

If there is a way to get my hands on a set of plans please PM me, I have just finished a recent build and would love to build an Farrier Tri in my lifetime. 

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A visionary engineer/designer

What a loss

Fantastic support for the building of 680 No 46 in Wiepa Gulf of Carpentaria 1977

And now appreciation every weekend racing an F28 Pittwater NSW 

Bazadin

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Words fail.  So a pic instead. 

This was just one of many, many beautiful moments Ian had already given us.   The good news is that because of what Ian did, he gets to keep on giving.

F-31 #001 will be cruising Abaco late Feb/March.  I'll hoist and drain a Kalik with anyone who wants to celebrate Ian's life, while enjoying the product of his life's work.

Cheers,

ben

Ottawa, Canada

North Channel sunset.jpg

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That Lahaina return video at ~6:55 is a fitting tribute (yee haaaa) to the man that, in my view, brought high speed "cruising" to the "masses", on a family budget.  What a great legacy that will be remembered each time we go for a sail. 

I was so shocked in my earlier post that I forgot to add condolences to his family and friends.  I hope you find solace in the fact that he brought so many whoops and smiles to so many people and that will continue for a very long time.

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Heading off to Wags in Trinity my F28R number 14 at Rq if anyone wants to join me after the race for a drink to Ian Farrier. Sailors around the world are dedicating cruises or races this week to the most amazing boat designer ever.

Ian would be chuffed they are starting us on the same GPS time as Boom, his and my first F22R which he described as his best ever design and production boat. 

 

Peter Hackett 

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I don't weigh in much on Sailing Anarchy but,hey, this is about Ian Farrier. I had the good fortune to get to know Ian way back in 92 when Janine and I were building Redshift, our beloved F9A which had the distinction of spawning the "R" series of F boats. Having built multiple Multihulls before Redshift I can attest to the fact that building to Ian's plan book was an absolute pleasure. He took all of the head scratching out of the build process and every day I marvelled at the man's genius. And then having never seen another F9A we launched her. The genius came through again, in spades, when we sailed her. Everyone who sailed an F boat has been impressed but those of us who built them gained a special appreciation for Ian. And then there is the support FOR FREEKIN EVER! How that man ever got any real work done was beyond me but he did. Hard to believe but he never stopped improving and coming up with new and up to date refined designs. There are lots of good designers out there but Ian's commitment to his clients was something special. In my opinion Ian did more to legitamise the Multihull concept than any one else that I can think of but he did something more. He spawned a global fraternity that will last for a very long time. So many lasting friendships, far an wide, have been made through the F boat fraternity and we all have Ian to thank for that. Ian and I remained in touch through all those years and my world feels smaller with his passing.

Cheers Ian, I will continue trying to do you proud sailing the Bejesus out of my current F Boat.

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My first sail on a trimaran was a 300nm race on a home-built F31.  The first night we were careering at great speed into the back of the wave in front, repeatedly submerging the boat back past the mast.  I said then, "we are in the hands of the designer - I've run out of ideas - if he got it right, we'll live".  He got it right and I sailed thousands more miles on that boat, loving every mile.

 

Thanks Mr Farrier.  RIP.

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Why do the good guys always go first, sad day for all multihullers and as Ian was enthusiastic of all sailing forms and shapes, a genuinely sad day for sailing in general. His wisdom and design skills will be missed.

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My first sail on a trimaran was with mad Mick the Irishman on his 720 Flamingo. Thank you Mr Farrier for introducing me to the joys of "big" multihulls. 

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On 12/10/2017 at 9:31 PM, plywoodboy said:

One of my best mates has just left us, things will never be the same.

This is just in from NZ GM Rob Densem, no cause has been established yet.

Peter H

 

Hi Peter,

It is with a heavy heart that I tell you Ian Farrier passed away in San Francisco on his way back from the USA yesterday.

We are in deep shock as we come to terms with the huge loss of our captain, and our focus is on Ian’s immediate family and the Farrier Marine team. 

Ian was a visionary, a multihull genius, an all-round nice guy who leaves behind a huge legacy to the sailing world.

Farrier Marine Limited is a strong business with a three year order book for the revolutionary F-22 sailboat. Despite dealing with our grief, it is very much ‘business as usual’ at the factory today. It is our job now to carry on the Farrier legacy and ensure his vision is carried out.

 

 

Regards

 

Rob

:( So sad.  One heck of a designer.

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Of all the great stories of F boat sailing, one of my favorites is when we took an older Couple from Connecticut out for a sail on the F31R off Waikiki.  They were game for us to light it up off the wind and the gentleman commented that he was surprised how nimble the boat was for the size of the seas and strength of wind we where in.  He commented that "now I get what all the hype is about, Ian has done a good job on these boats."  When we got back to WYC his wife admitted that this was both of their first time on a "Trimaran."  This was a big surprise to us as the assumed secret reason that he was on the West coast was to help BMW put one of his wings on the big tri in San Diego.  I will not forget watching David Hubbard enjoy his first time on a trimaran and complementing Ian on the great boat.   RIP to both...  Mahalo Ian for all the stories, still being made...

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Fellow Farrier Followers:

It has been very humbling for Ian's Immediate family and his 'factory family', to read the wonderful, heart-felt comments you have all made.

The gap he has left in our lives is indescribable. We await his safe return to Christchurch, so that a fitting farewell can be had next week.

The Ian Farrier legend will live on, and continue to grow and prosper through the current F-22 program, which was just set to hit high gear. Our passion and desire to fulfill Ian's dream is steadfast, the show will go on. This week our team has been united in grief, and as Ian would expect, production has hardly missed a beat. The tears have not watered down the gelcoat. 

We have much to do in the coming weeks, and further updates will be forthcoming on F-boat.com.

Kind regards and thank you

Rob Densem

General Manager Farrier Marine

 

Ian.png

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I can add that the same kind of stories and concepts run in other fora in other languages, at least in Argentina. I'm sure it's the same in other countries you might not suspect out of the english-speaking world. A legend.

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The news of Ian's passing has been shocking, difficult few days to come to terms with this.

He took me under his wing and trusted me when I created Multihulls Direct.
 
We worked closely together for more than 5 years introducing the production F-33 and F-45 as well as recently working on the F-22.  
 
We spend thousands of hours together. Ian was smart, creative, driven, intuitive, and all about quality. He was a great teacher and friend. 
 
With all the challenges, I always respected him and admired him as a boat designer, family man and friend. There will never be another Ian Farrier. Michael Mallory
 
 

 

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In the late '80s, my dad shared his excitement with me about a new boat design - a trimaran sailboat that could be folded up and trailered behind your car to new cruising spots. About 30 years later, I was happy to finally own one. I offer my condolences to family and friends of Ian Farrier, and my gratitude for the many happy hours my family and I have had on his creations.

boatPix2.PNG

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Hi Farrier Fans,

What a week it has been.

Ian will be returning to his family on Monday, and plans are well advanced for a celebration of his life on Thursday Dec 21 1.30pm at Academy Funeral Services Main South Rd Christchurch. 

Once again thank you for the kindness and thoughtfulness shown to us at this difficult time.

Despite our loss, Ian's factory team has worked incredibly hard this week, and completed another milestone. The completion of F-22 sailboat #16, and further advanced #17, #18 and #19.

With three and half years worth of F-22 orders to fulfill, we are gonna be busy for decades to come.

regards

Rob Densem

General Manager

Farrier Marine

 

IMG_0556.JPG

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Thanks Rob.

Hey Fellas,

I have been honoured by Ian's family with an invitation to speak at my old friend's service. I will head across the ditch next week, representing you guys and assume you are ok with me quoting some of these wonderful "extended family member" words that are still getting me emotional whenever I read them. 

I will publish my notes here next week. You may be interested in my WAGS / beercan/ white sails race we did Wednesday on Trinity my 1997 F28R. The starts are timed based on performance handicaps and we started alongside Boom! the first F22R. In the 5  - 10 knot swinging breeze, we had similar speed to Boom, and juggled the lead several times as we cut through a big fleet of catamarans and monohulls. I was not too upset when the wind freshened a little and Boom took off like a scalded cat in the reach to the finish and won convincingly from another cat then us. The Master would have been pretty happy with the outcome, but probably more impressed with the squeals of my young cousins on Trinity for their first ride on a multihull.  "Why are the big leaning boats so much slower? I really like lying out on these nets when we go past them!"

 

Peter

(please feel free to pm me directly with any specific advice)

 

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7 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

assume you are ok with me quoting some of these wonderful "extended family member" words that are still getting me emotional whenever I read them. 

... probably more impressed with the squeals of my young cousins on Trinity for their first ride on a multihull.  "Why are the big leaning boats so much slower? I really like lying out on these nets when we go past them!"

You're free to quote anything I said but I'd say you have a real winner there.

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He designed some amazing boats.  So many good times and amazing journeys.  The community of people who sailed them turned out to be pretty great too.  

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I am sure you will all agree that this gesture at the service by the factory gang was pretty special. 

Peter

Resized_20171221_130608_7258-2.jpeg

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1 hour ago, plywoodboy said:

My notes hopefully attached, and I read some of your good lines from this forum also. Sorry to report I was a bit emotional.

 

Celebration of the life of Ian Farrier - detailed-2.docx

Good stories Pete. Well done. 

I also had my own little tribute to Ian yesterday. Blasting around the bay in a 25 knot WAGS race in my 22 with no dramas just great fun. He lives on. 

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Nicely put Peter.

As the current custodian of your first Farrier "Try Flying", I am proud to continue the restoration and general improvements of this great old girl. She has been a source of a lot of joy and an equal measure of fear for our family over the years while throughout keeping us safe as we learn the ropes. BTW fear was from running before +25knot southerly and 3m swell/1+m seas with a big arse square top and surge surfing at 15knots while the aft end of the boat lifted.... 

It is also fair to say that Mad Hatter (my mates F85sr that he built and I got the pleasure to help with CNC bits and now crew on) was only built because of a pleasant sail he had on our TT720 down the coast to Sydney in 15knots of breeze and gentle 2.5m swell which convinced the dyed in the wool cat sailor that these tri things were pretty cool.

 

I'm very fortunate to own one of Ian's earliest home built designs and get to crew on one of his last. Both awesome in their own unique way and an enduring tribute to a designer whose creations have allowed all of us to create our own great sailing adventures.

 

 

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9 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

My notes hopefully attached, and I read some of your good lines from this forum also. Sorry to report I was a bit emotional.

 

Celebration of the life of