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Lightning Slow

SAN JUAN 34

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Well after 10 years of not having a sailboat, my wife said get a sailboat!!!! WOW. Sweet. She has known for some time that I wanted to get back into it. She also knew that I had been looking at them. So now I have a 1980 SAN JUAN 34. She is in awesome condition, ( the boat that is, and yes the wife too. LOL) with a large inventory of sails. She had been well cared for over the years and yes, she has the same issues of any older boat, but not the bad issues of a neglected or poorly cared for boat. Solid and water tight hall and deck. I feel like a kid in a candy store and this is by far the best Christmas present ever. Now I need to wait for some warmer weather to shake her out a bit.

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23 minutes ago, By the lee said:

Pics or it didn't happen. 

Of tits, not the boat.

I wanna see both.

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On 12/21/2017 at 12:21 PM, Lightning Slow said:

Well after 10 years of not having a sailboat, my wife said get a sailboat!!!! WOW. Sweet. She has known for some time that I wanted to get back into it. She also knew that I had been looking at them. So now I have a 1980 SAN JUAN 34. She is in awesome condition, ( the boat that is, and yes the wife too. LOL) with a large inventory of sails. She had been well cared for over the years and yes, she has the same issues of any older boat, but not the bad issues of a neglected or poorly cared for boat. Solid and water tight hall and deck. I feel like a kid in a candy store and this is by far the best Christmas present ever. Now I need to wait for some warmer weather to shake her out a bit.

I think that your post is great, but there isn't a question, hence the silly replies.

Is yours the flush-deck SJ34?

FB- Doug

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That's the 33 - an entirely different boat, akin to the Tartan 10.

The SJ34 is a reboot of a locally designed & built boat - the Crown 34. The tooling was sold on and became the Sun 34 and the SJ34 - I think in that order but I'm not certain.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

That's the 33 - an entirely different boat, akin to the Tartan 10.

The SJ34 is a reboot of a locally designed & built boat - the Crown 34. The tooling was sold on and became the Sun 34 and the SJ34 - I think in that order but I'm not certain.

+1. I raced on a Crown 34 for a couple of years. I believe there were some changes made when Clark Boat Company started building them as SJ34. I they eliminated the rudder skeg. IOR design and was a pretty powerful upwind boat.

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Hmmm...the SJ 34 pales in comparison  than the original Crown 34. I knew the designer/builder for many years and considered a good friend. Went on to build the Sceptre 36 and designed and built the now Iconic Sceptre 41. Sailed on his Gretel II and Gentleman Jim Pine's "Moody Too". lots of them in the area and find a good one you are golden. Hard boats to wreck them as they are well built well. Oddly a new one just popped on the market over Xmas and the owners had it from new.:  https://vancouver.craigslist.ca/nvn/boa/6439316403.html

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I found this.

After the first CROWN 34's were built, Calgan Marine sold the molds to GlassFab of Monroe, WA.,USA. A few were then manufactured and sold as the SUN 1030. Later, the molds were repossessed by Calgan and then sold to Clark Boat Co. USA. With a few modifications they were then built and sold as the SAN JUAN 34.

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I found this.

After the first CROWN 34's were built, Calgan Marine sold the molds to GlassFab of Monroe, WA.,USA. A few were then manufactured and sold as the SUN 1030. Later, the molds were repossessed by Calgan and then sold to Clark Boat Co. USA. With a few modifications they were then built and sold as the SAN JUAN 34.

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=1944

That sail plan looks disturbingly like that of a SJ24. Otherwise..........

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21 hours ago, Nice! said:

Maxx - how does the Sun 34 fit into the gene pool of the Crown 34?

What SJB said really. I have a bit history of the Crown 34 and Calgan Marine hidden somewhere and when Calgan got the molds back they produced 4 more in 1977 with the 1 ton rig in configuration like pictured in the link. I'll try to find the brief history. I believe or my opinion that thy were created to compete with Dougie Peterson's Ganbare and then produced by Donnie Martin. The are was lousy with them. I think I counted 14 or so at one point. Not as well built then then the Crown at all but more successful on the race course though. Raced a bunch of them over the years from John Jarman's "Prophecy" to Victor Trump's "Brigadoon" (we won Straits and Swiftsure on it) to "Baggin's" (with a second OA in Straits too) etc, etc. But the Crown's weren't too shabby as well. I think the Crown - "Boru" as winner in those races. Might have been the 1 ton configuration as well; I'm not certain about that but? There was the Crown "Allsun" that might have been the last one built but a perennial favourite and race winner for many years.

BTW SJB - From that era I was at a Celebration of Life for Stan Wilson yesterday at WVYC. The long time general a manager of Pacific Spar and partner as well for starting the business.   

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14 minutes ago, Maxx Baqustae said:

BTW SJB - From that era I was at a Celebration of Life for Stan Wilson yesterday at WVYC. The long time general a manager of Pacific Spar and partner as well for starting the business.   

I didn't know him but I remember the business well.

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This was blatantly stolen from the web and my files: 

Crown 34 was designed and built in vancouver. The design has stood the test of time and given it's owners a fabulous platform both racing and cruising.

The Crown 34 was the first boat designed by Hein Driehuyzen (pronounced "Dry-hue-zen"). Hein was working as the manager of Calgan Marine in North Vancouver, BC when they decided to add a larger boat to the existing Crown line which included 23 and 28 foot models. The boat was designed in 1974 more or less to the IOR rule, with a large fortriangle, tall mast and narrow transom. A large, skeg-hung rudder yielded a very seakindly helm, uncharacteristic of many other IOR boats of that time. In a recent conversation with Hein, he was justifiably still quite pleased with the Crown 34 and it's longevity. He told me that the design of the Crown was influenced by Peterson designs of the day such as the Ganbare 35, as well as a Cal T2 on which Hein was racing at the time, and the Scampi 30 which he admired. In it's design, the Crown attempted to marry the performance attributes of an IOR design while still providing a comfortable cruising platform.

The first Crown 34, Tri Kaya, launched in June of 1975 to owner John Ruffelle. Tri Kaya was actually hull number 2, hull number 1 (the plug for the mold), was sold and later launched by Don Cliburn. Hull number 3 was launched in August of 1975, as Moody Too, and it is a testimony to the boat that Jim Pine of West Vancouver still owns and actively races the boat today. Tri Kaya was the boat used in the 1975 review by Pacific Yachting. The original price was CDN $39,500.00, sans sails and electronics.

Somewhere around 30 boats were built by Calgan, before the molds where sold to GlassFab of Monroe, WA. GlassFab built the boat, essentially unmodified, and sold them as the "Sun 1030" through a marketing agreement with Sun Yachts of Vancouver. There were various marketing and financial problems between the two companies, and after one or two years, the molds were repossessed by Calgan and in turn, sold to Dave Clark of Clark Boat Co. in Federal Way, WA. Less than a half a dozen Sun 1030 boats were built. Clark was known for their line of San Juan boats, most notably the San Juan 24. The Skeg was removed, the galley layout redesigned, one set of portlights removed, mid-boom sheeting added, and the San Juan 34 was born. The largest sailboat in the San Juan line, around 50 San Juan 34 were sold between 1980 and 1988.

Crown 34s have been very active in the Northwest PRHF racing scene for many years. Hein himself owned and raced hull #16, Gretel as some of you from the Vancouver area may recall. Aside from many club races, Crown 34s have placed well in races such as the Swiftsure Lightship Classic and the Sloop Tavern Victoria to Maui Race.

After leaving Calgan in 1976, Hein went on to create design the Sceptre line of yachts. The first in that line was the Sceptre 36, which was based on and elongated Crown 34 hull. Sceptre eventually grew into a line of popular blue water cruising boats, all designed by Driehuyzen. Like the Crown, the Sceptre line has foster strong owner loyalty.

 

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It has to be noted that Gentleman Jim Pine passed away several years ago. Stopped racing much earlier as dementia got the better of him. A little sad. I did enjoy to race with him and his long time crew. Always a after race Navy Rum or the brave a Pinker's and Gin!

 

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19 hours ago, mcmurdo said:

The Summer Sky. A long time WVYC boat.The owner went on to a Express 37 and then a big fat ass Bunter as better as a powerboat.  Not surprising as the designer/builder was a WVYC member and I considered him a long time friend. The 1979 year might be pushing it as it would have been the last one out of the shed from Calgan. Perhaps it was sort of a kit, perhaps like "Allsun" as build the first build of the Sceptre 36's started in '79. Everybody that would know would be in Hawaii or Mexico at this time. I thing the price is "okay" but besides maxi prop the '77 is 3k cheaper, well loved from new and kitted out right. The owners have age/health issues and are in the "sleepy" boat program at club. Use it or sell it! As one of the most valuable moorage in the whole area. I think the price more than acceptable but it will end up for a deal for someone as they "have" to sell it. 

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