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jonas a

Sleeping while Solo Sailing

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There was an article about sleeping patterns for solo sailors here in Finland. Ari Huusela is doing some collaboration with local sleep doctors. The punch line is that in 24h, it's enough to sleep for 1,5 h without interruption "to activate the brains metabolism and for removal of slime"

Article translated: here

and original: here

Google translation far from perfect . I 'll try to correct later

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From what I have observed individual sleep requirements vary substantially.  Some fall over quickly others are like  machines. All I know I need a very large alarm clock and at times maybe one connected to some sort of shock device.

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When we did research for the Vendee, the aim was to get 20- 40 min Catnaps, with (ideally) 1 x 1.5 hr period. Aiming to get to 5 hrs total.

I don't think Dee ever managed the full 5 hrs, but she seems to require very little sleep in general.

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My sleep cycle is short at night, long  during the day 

As a result I use an alarm clock  during daylight 

all my close calls have happened durling daylight 

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I did a solo 9000nm jaunt a few years ago, and mostly slept 45 minute segments 6-8 times per day. I recall some research that one REM cycle was about 45 minutes, and that worked well for me. I did do an occasional 90-minute sleep, maybe once every 4-5 days.

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6 hours ago, slug zitski said:

My sleep cycle is short at night, long  during the day 

As a result I use an alarm clock  during daylight 

all my close calls have happened durling daylight 

That's because, just like logs and whales, the other boats aren't there at night.  Miraculous.

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At night your eyes are very sensitive...you can see the lighs on fishing boats, long line bouys.... befoe the radar picks it up.

this sensory assault,   physiologically,  prevents  me  from sleeping 

the  opposite is true during daylight ...psychologically  i feel safe and could accidentally sleep all day 

 

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Sleep and fatigue. The biggest battle of all. What are usually simple tasks become I find insurmountable when tired. 

RTW solo high speeders of the ilk of Joyon, McArthur, Gabart, Stamm, and so many others sailing at huge speeds, working their arses off on huge boats. 

So much respect-  it’s unspeakable and I have no jealousy at all. I feel sick just thinking how hard it must be when you feel like dying from tiredness day in day out,  week in week out, minute after minute, hour after hour and you must work work work and struggle  and you’re freezing cold, and there’s no where to hide and no one to help and you are pushing, always pushing, and shit is breaking and failing.  

And the show must go on. The boat must be sailing flat out. All the time.  “Ah bugger it, I’ll just leave the reef in for a while” doesn’t cut the mustard. 

Brutal. 

How can you sleep doing 30-40 knots on the edge of control with the middle hull poised to go skyward? 

Maybe they need the equivalent of motocycle auto traction control to maintain on the edge speed but reduces power through sheet tension and/or steers to reduce power if the main hull gets too airborne.

or in the future auto electronic control to adjust foils for negative lift if pitchpoling or heeling incline gets too much

That would allow you to sleep like a baby, right. Atleast AIS should help with alarming if on collision course. 

Mad bastards (and bitches)! And mainly  French. What is wrong with them!!!??? The French. 

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There were some interesting sleep studies done with Peter Goss on his TransAt solo on the little 26' CORNISH MEADOW catamaran. He wore an accelerometer on his wrist which logged to a unit which logged the boats motion in parallel. If the two instrument traces (imagine a paper barometer trace) were the same, the assumption was that he was sleeping or at least resting. To think that a simple 'smart watch' like a fitbit can do such tracking very simply and cheaply these days. 

    Pete doesn't sleep much when racing, but when things are mellow he can flip a switch in his head and drop right off. He says that they teach you that in the Royal Marines and is the hallmark of any good soldier. Get the rest when you can, you will need it later when the shit hits the fan.

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I found that during my solo times, if the trim is good, and the course is clear, I'll try to get my sleep in anytime I can because I know, without fail, eventually, the autopilot will try to murder me. #itisknown

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I decided long ago (forty years ) that the biggest danger out there was fatigue, leading to poor decisions and reactions.  It's not the only factor but it's a factor in most incidents.

Back then, I trained myself to get on deck on hearing any unexplained sound and that seems to have worked.  I often slept through the night with just a few deck-checks,  There were few whales then (maybe one per year), few cruising boats and I was cruising waters that had no interest to shipping.  I would head offshore or heave-to if close to land.

It's very different for the racers and I'm in awe of people who can push to the max and still get useful sleep.

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16 hours ago, harrygee said:

I decided long ago (forty years ) that the biggest danger out there was fatigue, leading to poor decisions and reactions.  It's not the only factor but it's a factor in most incidents.

Back then, I trained myself to get on deck on hearing any unexplained sound and that seems to have worked.  I often slept through the night with just a few deck-checks,  There were few whales then (maybe one per year), few cruising boats and I was cruising waters that had no interest to shipping.  I would head offshore or heave-to if close to land.

It's very different for the racers and I'm in awe of people who can push to the max and still get useful sleep.

To avoid fatigue and keep my senses sharp i never have music playing . No noise.

books , reading , also add to fatigue. 

Twinkling LEDs and other light sources are blacked out 

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On ‎12‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 3:42 PM, Miffy said:

Brain slime??? :rolleyes:

Terrible stuff.  It's when your random thoughts pile up in your brain's bilge and don't evaporate quickly enough.  One scrapes up the strangest bits of sludge... "oh look, here's a bit of Justin Bieber's pot arrest.  And it's stuck to an origami yacht line drawing.  WTF..."  Usually it can only be removed by a trained neurologistician, or a bartender.

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On 2018-01-03 at 4:23 PM, Lex Teredo said:

Terrible stuff.  It's when your random thoughts pile up in your brain's bilge and don't evaporate quickly enough.  One scrapes up the strangest bits of sludge... "oh look, here's a bit of Justin Bieber's pot arrest.  And it's stuck to an origami yacht line drawing.  WTF..."  Usually it can only be removed by a trained neurologistician, or a bartender.

Yes, indeed really dangerous stuff. While arguing on SA one is especially susceptible to reaching high levels of brain slime.

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On 12/24/2017 at 1:28 AM, slug zitski said:

 

Twinkling LEDs and other light sources are blacked out 

Even your mast head strobe?

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On 12/23/2017 at 2:57 PM, Zonker said:

The multihulls do have sheet release systems that have gotten fairly sophisticated. 

http://www.oceandatasystem.com/accueil/en

 

What a waste of money. Rafts float fine upside down. But what of rule 5 oh great master of the colregs?

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