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Franza

And another "lost sailor"

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Looks like a bent spreader on the pic. Let’s ask Jenn for her input.

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5 minutes ago, Rum Runner said:

Wait for the Clean interview.

Clean is working his way into Rimas's drift path for that long awaited interview....patience

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Zibigniew is the spitting image of Tom Hanks. Expect that film rights will be purchased shortly, followed by Castaway Part II. 

The cat will play the stand -in for Wilson; named Kielbasa...

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7 months yet his mustache seems perfectly trimmed. Sorry man, 7 months on a boat alone with a cat and practically nothing to eat means you won't look like anything other than the homeless street bums

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5 hours ago, Parma said:

7 months yet his mustache seems perfectly trimmed. Sorry man, 7 months on a boat alone with a cat and practically nothing to eat means you won't look like anything other than the homeless street bums

7 months???   I'm surprised the cat is still alive.

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On 12/28/2017 at 2:36 PM, slug zitski said:

Imagine what the inside temp of that black painted boat was during daylight.

poor bugger

 

Another Darwin award that dodged the bulletS!  Did you look at the tracks on the link, of which direction he was heading, versus which direction he managed to travel?  Almost diametrically opposed..

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I am going to cut this guy some slack because he is Polish.  Believe me, Polish people are some tough mofos, given the history of Poland, they have to be.  Depending on where in Poland he is from, being adrift for 7 months with limited food may not have been any real hardship.

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1 hour ago, Morgan Crewed said:

7 months???   I'm surprised the cat is still alive.

I have been told, that not all men eat pussy.

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25 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

I have been told, that not all POLISH men eat pussy.

 

This is probably true.  But we do know of one retired, ex-pat GI, from the US, living in Poland, who is happliy capitalizing, on that underserved market segment, Soak-Ed!!!  LOL

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Looks like a very well performing vessel... why didn't he just hoist the sails?  I'm sure no one found him because his boat is black and very low profile.

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2 hours ago, soak_ed said:

I am going to cut this guy some slack because he is Polish.  Believe me, Polish people are some tough mofos, given the history of Poland, they have to be.  Depending on where in Poland he is from, being adrift for 7 months with limited food may not have been any real hardship.

Had a Polish piano teacher.  Chopin made my hands cry.

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9 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Had a Polish piano teacher.  Chopin made my hands cry.

Chopin's music captures the essence, the soul, of Poland.  

Sorry about your hands.  My estranged wife has been teaching piano here for a good part of her life.  She wouldn't make your hands cry.

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4 hours ago, soak_ed said:

I am going to cut this guy some slack because he is Polish.  Believe me, Polish people are some tough mofos, given the history of Poland, they have to be.  Depending on where in Poland he is from, being adrift for 7 months with limited food may not have been any real hardship.

Tough indeed.

Do you know the story of Anders Army ? 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csvn8t

 

IMG_7631.PNG

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6 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I have been told, that not all men eat pussy.

No fukin' way!   :o

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6 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I have been told, that not all men eat pussy.

Only the cunning linguists.........

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

I had a Russian piano teacher. My hands made him cry.

My estranged wife has been teaching piano for the better part of her life.  She wouldn't cry about your hands.

Chopin's music evokes the very essence, the soul of Poland.

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soak_ed.

     The Russian pianist had been on tour with the Ballet and orchestras and was well known as a concert pianist world wide. He was one of the first 'defectors' in the 60's while on tour in the US. :About the same time as some Bolshoi Ballet defectors. Unfortunately he didn't get the open arm welcome that the dancers did and ended up teaching piano to snot nose kids like myself. He drilled me hard and was a good teacher but the crying over my hands was more about the fact that he had stout short sausage shaped fingers. He had a hard time getting them to fit between the black keys but had worked all that into his technique. He would look at my long slender fingers that had a two note greater spread than his even though I was still growing and just weep that it wasn't fair. He used to chastise me for not doing my exercises and being prepared for my weekly lessons by saying that if he had my hands he would be the best pianist in the world. I heard many years later from my Mom that he finally found his way back into the mainstream piano world and I haven't touched the ivories for years.

    The thing I remember the best about those piano days was when a blind black piano tuner would get dropped off at our house by taxi about every 6 months (Norfolk, Va humidity) to tune up our Kawai. The piano teacher had recommended him since he refused to play or give lessons on a piano that was not it tune. The old blind guy would work the piano over and when done would rock back and play the best blues and boogie-woogie that I have heard to this day with a big grin on his face. I asked  him how he could play the piano without reading music notation on paper and he just said, 'By ear, son...'  He called sheet music, 'Fly specs on paper'.

    I was always more impressed by the black tuner who could play from his soul rather than the studied practised technique that was the order that the master that my instructor represented. 

     

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This might be obliquely relevant.  Or not.

In the 80's, when the iron curtain came down, we ended up hiring several Poles in the lab where I worked.  They had mad skills in things like glassblowing and organic synthesis, and worked cheap.  Stuff that you or I would pick up the phone and order from a catalog, they had no choice but to make from scratch.  So they were very handy when the job required custom work, but you didn't have any money.  But.  Absolutely no concept whatsoever of chemical or industrial safety.  All of their senses were burned out from chemical exposure.  They looked twice their age.  

One vivid example, I will probably never forget:  This Strangelovian guy was assigned to help with my project, synthesizing a 14C version of a nitro-aromatic compound I was studying, as a tracer.  (Think, "TNT," etc.). Neon yellow.  Highly toxic and radioactive.  Absorbs through the skin just as fast as if you drank it.  So, one day I am approaching the building that contains the lab that I am nominally in charge of, and it appears that an evacuation is in progress. Classes have been cancelled. The fire department is being called.  Nasty-smelling fumes are rolling down the hallway... from the direction of my lab I note with a very sinking feeling.  So, I head in there, and this Polish guy is happily puttering away at this elaborate apparatus set up on the open work bench.  

"Stephan..."

"Stephan!"

"STEPHAN!!!!" 

Finally, he turns, surprised to see me.  Yellow fingerprints all over his forehead.  "?"

"Stephan, is there some reason that you can't do that in the fume hood?"

"What?  You...?   You mean you can smell that?"

****

So now I am trying to translate all that into sailing, and somehow it all seems to fit...

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I imagine that this sailor brought Rachmaninoff for the ‘epic splendor’ soundtrack.

In school I fell on my knees spellbound,  listening to a most beautiful, talented, long curly haired woman practicing the Rachmaninoff 2nd for her Senior Recital.   

My Russian, Aknazi-Jew g/f and I both wept throughout a performance of Rachmaninoff’s 3rd by the Moscow Radio Symphony, whose strings were mostly young, beautiful women.  Aural and visual overload so intense we could not control ourselves and just fell into that perfect world where Music alone can take you.

Music sends some off the edge of the world and perhaps this mad sailor was having quite a fine, late-in life adventure?

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6 hours ago, blunderfull said:

I imagine that this sailor brought Rachmaninoff for the ‘epic splendor’ soundtrack.

In school I fell on my knees spellbound,  listening to a most beautiful, talented, long curly haired woman practicing the Rachmaninoff 2nd for her Senior Recital.   

My Russian, Aknazi-Jew g/f and I both wept throughout a performance of Rachmaninoff’s 3rd by the Moscow Radio Symphony, whose strings were mostly young, beautiful women.  Aural and visual overload so intense we could not control ourselves and just fell into that perfect world where Music alone can take you.

Music sends some off the edge of the world and perhaps this mad sailor was having quite a fine, late-in life adventure?

The power of music is incredible.

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7 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

soak_ed.

     The Russian pianist had been on tour with the Ballet and orchestras and was well known as a concert pianist world wide. He was one of the first 'defectors' in the 60's while on tour in the US. :About the same time as some Bolshoi Ballet defectors. Unfortunately he didn't get the open arm welcome that the dancers did and ended up teaching piano to snot nose kids like myself. He drilled me hard and was a good teacher but the crying over my hands was more about the fact that he had stout short sausage shaped fingers. He had a hard time getting them to fit between the black keys but had worked all that into his technique. He would look at my long slender fingers that had a two note greater spread than his even though I was still growing and just weep that it wasn't fair. He used to chastise me for not doing my exercises and being prepared for my weekly lessons by saying that if he had my hands he would be the best pianist in the world. I heard many years later from my Mom that he finally found his way back into the mainstream piano world and I haven't touched the ivories for years.

    The thing I remember the best about those piano days was when a blind black piano tuner would get dropped off at our house by taxi about every 6 months (Norfolk, Va humidity) to tune up our Kawai. The piano teacher had recommended him since he refused to play or give lessons on a piano that was not it tune. The old blind guy would work the piano over and when done would rock back and play the best blues and boogie-woogie that I have heard to this day with a big grin on his face. I asked  him how he could play the piano without reading music notation on paper and he just said, 'By ear, son...'  He called sheet music, 'Fly specs on paper'.

    I was always more impressed by the black tuner who could play from his soul rather than the studied practised technique that was the order that the master that my instructor represented. 

     

Ahh, so you have fingers made to play the piano!   

Poles are musical but the Russians  are incredibly musical, it must be in their genes or something.  At my wife's music school, there are 3 Chernobyl refugees teaching.  A husband and wife couple, she teaches piano, he teaches the violin.  Another guy teaches guitar.  A few years ago, the piano teacher discovered a prodigy, every teachers dream.  The boy is amazing.  At the age of 9 he had his first major concert and played a Beethoven piano concerto with the Brandenburg State Orchestra.  He played from memory, no sheet music.  It was incredible.  Not only was his technique spot on but he played with a passion that you just couldn't believe somebody could have at that age.  There were very few dry eyes in the concert hall when he finished playing.  The young man is now in Warsaw studying at Poland's premier music academy, schools all over Poland were fighting to have him. If he doesn't burn out, he will become famous, I'm sure.  The teacher here did a fantastic job of helping him develop his talent.

I have seen quite a few blind piano tuners over the years.  It's amazing to watch them.

 

Here is young Maciej playing Bach's  Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, at another concert, also when he was 9.  Incredible!  I especially like the 2nd movement.  That's my wife driving the orchestra.

 

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16 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Another Darwin award that dodged the bulletS!  Did you look at the tracks on the link, of which direction he was heading, versus which direction he managed to travel?  Almost diametrically opposed..

That makes for an entertaining drifter but I'm afraid the tale is over...

 

Quote

 

Mr Reket was reported as saying said he would consider staying on Reunion, which as an EU citizen he is entitled to do.

“I want to have a normal life, find a job, and why not stay here?” he asked.

 

 
Obviously doesn't have the stuff that record breaking world voyagers are made of.

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2 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Obviously doesn't have the stuff that record breaking world voyagers are made of.

 

No, not nearly as capable Rimas, if you can believe that!!

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It is a neat idea to take a cruse ship lifeboat and make a sailboat out of it.   Perhaps not wise, but neat.

But imagine how hot it is with the black paint! 

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33 minutes ago, BrickTopHarry said:

The vessel looks like some Waterworld/Mad Max post apocalyptic steampunk thing.  I approve.

479858BF00000578-5215543-image-a-2_15143

Same, I love the idea of folks being creative, thought I wonder if he just put a mast on it, or if he added anything under it to help it not just slide leeward.  

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43 minutes ago, distorted humor said:

Same, I love the idea of folks being creative, thought I wonder if he just put a mast on it, or if he added anything under it to help it not just slide leeward.  

Perhaps that's one reason he wound in the opposite direction of his intended landfall?

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16 hours ago, toddster said:

This might be obliquely relevant.  Or not.

In the 80's, when the iron curtain came down, we ended up hiring several Poles in the lab where I worked.  They had mad skills in things like glassblowing and organic synthesis, and worked cheap.  Stuff that you or I would pick up the phone and order from a catalog, they had no choice but to make from scratch.  So they were very handy when the job required custom work, but you didn't have any money.  But.  Absolutely no concept whatsoever of chemical or industrial safety.  All of their senses were burned out from chemical exposure.  They looked twice their age.  

One vivid example, I will probably never forget:  This Strangelovian guy was assigned to help with my project, synthesizing a 14C version of a nitro-aromatic compound I was studying, as a tracer.  (Think, "TNT," etc.). Neon yellow.  Highly toxic and radioactive.  Absorbs through the skin just as fast as if you drank it.  So, one day I am approaching the building that contains the lab that I am nominally in charge of, and it appears that an evacuation is in progress. Classes have been cancelled. The fire department is being called.  Nasty-smelling fumes are rolling down the hallway... from the direction of my lab I note with a very sinking feeling.  So, I head in there, and this Polish guy is happily puttering away at this elaborate apparatus set up on the open work bench.  

"Stephan..."

"Stephan!"

"STEPHAN!!!!" 

Finally, he turns, surprised to see me.  Yellow fingerprints all over his forehead.  "?"

"Stephan, is there some reason that you can't do that in the fume hood?"

"What?  You...?   You mean you can smell that?"

****

So now I am trying to translate all that into sailing, and somehow it all seems to fit...

Great story!  When I was a student, organic chemistry was owned by central Europeans.  Sadly, many now dead from liver cancer.  The days of distilling benzene et al on the bench with some nice asbestos insulation around the retort stand are long gone.

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37 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Perhaps that's one reason he wound in the opposite direction of his intended landfall?

Highly probable.

 

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3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

Perhaps that's one reason he wound in the opposite direction of his intended landfall?

Nah, he probably studied thousands of cruise ship lifeboats that became sailing vessels before he started.

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6 hours ago, BrickTopHarry said:

The vessel looks like some Waterworld/Mad Max post apocalyptic steampunk thing.  I approve.

479858BF00000578-5215543-image-a-2_15143

Really does.

Pirates prolly thought it a gunboat with rocket launcher.   

I'd buy him lunch and sit back for the stories.

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Nice stories about music, Polish people and....almost forgot this started with a lost sailor.  This is a cool thread.  Thanks.

I wondered whatever became of Marek Zebrowski who taught piano at UMass/Boston many years ago.  I felt privileged to have studied with so many fine teachers at a small public university.  Boston is quite amazing on so many musical levels.

https://music.usc.edu/marek-zebrowski/

 

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3 hours ago, soak_ed said:

Nah, he probably studied thousands of cruise ship lifeboats that became sailing vessels before he started.

Just means there a untapped resources for such boats being made into odd cruisers :rolleyes:

Now I am tempted to "design" the mods for a a cheap used lifeboat and make it into a workable sailboat.   Though one would most likely be better off buying a used glass boat of the same cost.

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9 hours ago, BrickTopHarry said:

The vessel looks like some Waterworld/Mad Max post apocalyptic steampunk thing.  I approve.

479858BF00000578-5215543-image-a-2_15143

Look to the horizon.... Smokers!!!!   Just enough wind to escape!

I don't think that his boat has the get up and go to escape.   Funny what movies stick with you.

Stumbling

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On 12/31/2017 at 2:46 PM, BrickTopHarry said:

The vessel looks like some Waterworld/Mad Max post apocalyptic steampunk thing.  I approve.

479858BF00000578-5215543-image-a-2_15143

why need lifeboat when already lifeboat! 

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On 12/31/2017 at 10:51 PM, distorted humor said:

Just means there a untapped resources for such boats being made into odd cruisers :rolleyes:

Now I am tempted to "design" the mods for a a cheap used lifeboat and make it into a workable sailboat.   Though one would most likely be better off buying a used glass boat of the same cost.

 

our seascout ship took an old lifeboat (open kind) from the USCG Eagle and converted it into sailboat (no cabin) ..   it sailed LIS for a couple of years...  

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Looks cool pretty hot..   I assume being a lifeboat there is some way to get back on board if you slip off the deck?   (Tether or not).   Costa Concordia showed that in a real emergency not everybody is able to board the lifeboats before they are dumped into the water, there were still swimmers.   It looks like they would float high when not packed like a sardine tin.

image.jpeg.8692708f4fd0cd518e071b21b134265f.jpeg

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I knew a guy in New Orleans who bought a lifeboat off a company on the Industrial Canal who inspected and repaired the lifeboats that the ships and cruise liners used. He bought one that was still basically sound but had timed out for a couple hundred dollars. He talked them into towing it a half mile to a concrete batch plant on the canal and for $10 the returning cement trucks would dump their excess concrete in his bilge instead of out onto the ground when the cleaned up their drums. He just watched the waterline and kept leveling the next batch of crete in the bilge. As there were no floorboards to speak on in the open lifeboat, he stopped when "that looks about right" and sprinkled some of that concrete dye on the wet concrete and brushed it in with a broom and then troweled in back down to a consistent texture and that was his new sole. He put it up the 17th Street canal dividing New Orleans from Jefferson Parish and raided campaign signs for 2x4's and 1/2" plywood for his deck/cockpit and cabin trunk. He put a salvage rig in it and by the time he was ready to shove off for Belize I think he had a total of $500 in his fine craft. 

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Rob and I met an old Polish sailor in Balchik on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria. He had a 28 footer and had sailed from Poland, round Scotland and had to be rescued by the Scottish RNLI after being knocked down in bad weather. He said he was a music professor from Warsaw University.

I went to help him when his boat was being blown off the dock and he couldn't pull himself near to it. I invited him over for a drink as it was Rob's birthday and he told us he had no food, needed a chart to get him to the White Sea and he also said his daughter had emptied out their joint account so he had no money. We gave him some food -cheese, salami, veg. Also gave him a chart of the Black Sea which included a portion of the White Sea. It was a gorgeous black and white chart which Rob wanted to keep, but we gave it up.

He came back later with his violin and played us some baroque Bach and walked us down the pontoon playing happy birthday. It was fab. He then went off to busk and earn some money. Turns out that was how he had got from Poland to Balchik.

Tricia xxx

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