wristwister

Marine supply places in SF Bay Area?

Recommended Posts

Hey folks, soon I'll be helping my daughter buy a sailboat and bring it to her slip up in the north bay. I suspect we'll spend a few days getting it ready for the trip, which will involve trips back and forth to marine supply places  to pick up parts and supplies. Couple questions for you bay area sailors:

What are the best chandleries in the north bay area, preferably not far from Vallejo?

Are there any 2nd hand stores around that sell used sails, lines, rigging tackle etc.?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2nd hand is Blue Pelican in Alameda. There’s a west marine and a small chandlery called Whale Point in Point Richmond. Not sure about Vallejo 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Svendsens in Alameda and the West in Alameda are both good, if you are down that way,

Hansen Rigging has some used bits and pieces and is a great resource in general 

Svendsens will be relocating, toward Richmond I think. check webpage. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Guys. She's picking up the boat at Alameda, so those will be good recommendations to get it ready.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had an email about Svendsens relocation BBQ. So they may be moved by time you are up.

Should you have any last minute sail issues, go see Sally Richards at Pineapple Sails.

They have been very helpful and stock some used sails. See their webpage for a list.

There’s a few electronics vendors in Alameda as well on Clement St. 

Bay Marine Diesel makes slip calls, and Liem Dao of ltdmarine.com is excellent at electrical

we use @fstbttms as our diver, he can recommend paint vs water. 

if you have reciprocity, Encinal YC is open most days and a gracious place to have lunch. 

We belong to OYC, open all week, bar/kitchen weds lunch, fri night, sun brunch. 

The “Sunday Brunch” series starts the 7th which can be entertaining, we will be the slow yawl. 

see jibeset.net for some of the events. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Svendsen's chandlery will stay where it is, just the boatyard is moving.  A great store if you don't mind getting stuff by mail is LFS Marine and Outdoor up in Bellingham.  Shipping is faster than Defender although they are more focused on commercial fishing than sailing.  But a good source for paint and rope as well as various other supplies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OP is in the PNW and LFS often has a booth at the Seattle boat show in January. I've gotten some incredible deals on dyneema and other (long) remnants there. Wouldn't be hard to bring some running rigging down in a suitcase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again for the advice everyone. Yes, I am in the PNW, and I'll be flying down to help my daughter. The idea is we spend a couple days in Alameda getting the boat ready, which will involve trips back and forth to chandleries (and Blue Pelican!), then we're going to sail it up to her slip in Vallejo.

One issue, the Isuzu engine isn't currently running. The seller thinks it may be a simple fix, but I'm not counting on that so we're making plans to do the trip engineless. I'm quite good at getting boats in and out of slips under sail, but I just found out the boat is currently on the east side of Alameda island on the estuary. I'm not sure about sailing out of that, including a draw bridge or two, so I'm looking at options to have us towed out the estuary into open water. Any advice on finding a tow in that area (other than Vessel Assist at $300/hour)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost all slips in the Estuary are north of the lift bridges. If there's wind, short tacking up the estuary is no problem even in 50' boats. In most places, it's deep right to shore - but do be careful on the north-east side of the ditch around the northern end of Coast Guard Island.

Keep an eye out for commercial traffic entering and leaving - tugs, pilot boats, bulk carriers and container ships. Full size ships often enter and turn around in the turning basin prior to tying up and there's not much room when they're completely broadside.

Once out of the estuary, be aware that there's often no wind on the east side of Treasure Island and it can be very, very light north of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. In the winter, the prevailing thermals are often shut down and the wind can be from any point of the compass and the entire bay is often glassed off.

Again, keep an eye out for commercial traffic once you're north of Angel Island and all the way to Vallejo.

Speak to the harbor master at Vallejo. Those marinas silt up and there's often not much depth.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now