17mika

2018 moth worlds - bermuda (march 25 - april 1st)

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2018 moth worlds are coming soon around Easter time in Bermuda.

http://www.mothworlds.org/bermuda/

Pretty envious to those that are going, that has to be a pretty special place to sail (well expenses to go there make it pretty special as well); entry numbers won't be the same as Garda, but most top guns should be there. few people from Italy, but I think the whole UK class will get in a cointainer to go there :D

In the meantime, while in Europe we are all busy doing useless upgrades, I guess the Aussie season is getting hot. Any news from down under?

 

 

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Aussie Nationals started today I think.

I'm sure the posts will start soon, about another hour or two of light left in the day.

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14 hours ago, aardvark_issues said:

I really hope your upgrade is better than useless!

Ahah let's hope so. the problem has always been the driver though :D

Stilk few weeks before she sees the water

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On 1/2/2018 at 3:51 PM, 17mika said:

but I think the whole UK class will get in a cointainer to go there

how many moth do you fit in a countainer? If you try to bother...

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There were 45 Australian at the Malcesine worlds, but at Wangi last week I found no one saying they were definately going to Bermuda. Its getting pretty late now to be starting the planning. Our association is not getting any feedback from requests to Bermuda about freight or accom. From local enquiry freight seems to require double handing via UK or US and double the cost and time for anywhere else. So do not expect much Aust participation if any.

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So 2 weeks to the worlds.

Any anarchyst going?

It looks like a pretty small fleet in bermuda... just 3 guys from Italy and a very small contingent from down under. Instead, Usual suspects from the uk and the us.

 

 

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About 38% more ($1110 vs $1530 ex GST), which includes the lever vang kit so not really a big difference. In the overall cost of a boat, likely not significant.

The issue of multiple sets of gear is not simple. Restricting boats to one set of foils per regatta may reduce the amount of good second hand gear coming onto the market. It might also reduce the size of the market and hence competition, pushing up prices.

It may also affect innovation as the top competitors will tend to go for safe choices (well known, well established manufacturers), making it harder for new players and innovative concepts to get their gear sailed by one of the top guys. No matter how good your gear, if you can't sail it well enough to impress, it's not going to be adopted. Everyone wants the stuff on the winning boats, which (in a fleet full of Olympic, World and AC champions) is what the top guys are using.

It's a similar problem with longevity, I don't think anyone considers it when buying. Current boats are all about the same, so building a longer lasting boat isn't a selling point if it's a fraction heavier or slower than it could be.

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The moth class has survived for 90 years mostly on people being inovative and creative and being able to make things and do alterations, improvements and experiments with their own hands. As a consequence of its history and some really good production line boats for about 10 years now, the class is probably now bigger than it has ever been, and certainly more exciting.

But a large proportion of the current sailors are not the types who do things themselves, preferring to buy off the shelf upgrades and pay others for repairs and improvements. A lot come from one design classes where such inovation is banned. Others are well healed enough to pay others to do the work for them.

So for these people owning a moth and keeping it up to date is very expensive. Developments in foils masts and sails seems to be constant and trying to stay near the front means frequent upgrades.

I had a mach2 for 6 years and in the 2017 season I spent heaps on bits including boom, sail, and foils, without geatly improving my places. Everyone gets faster at the same pace if we all upgrade together. I gave up the equipment race and sold the Mach2. 

This year I am sailng a 11 year old boat which I have improved with new systems and with a lot of the outdated gear from the Mach2. I am performing much the same, but I have about 1/3 of the $ invested in the boat. Yes I spent a lot of time and materials doing the upgrades but I am one of the old style mothies. Its a part of moth sailing which too many people are not enjoying anymore.

But I am against banning inovative equipment. (like bent booms since they get a mention in the survey). Banning stuff is not what made the class what it is today. I would be happy with a one equipment rule, like the I14s and ACats, also WS Dev classes. Maybe a min impact cost reduction change would be to get rid of bow sprits by deleting the 500mm bow appendage allowance.

The class has had some dramatic configuration/design changes in 90 years. The present configuration has been around over 10years and has been gradually refined. But the rules are open enough that another dramatic change is never imposible. One can only hope that it does not add further to costs when it happens.

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The issue of multiple sets of gear is obviously one of cost, but the real problem is the individual cost of each component. Last weekend I learnt that you can buy 2 rudders for an A Class, with all associated gear, for less than 1 single Moth rudder and that 2 A Class centreboards cost less than either a main foil vertical or horizontal. Even if we had a one equipment rule, how much will it help? The chances are it would push up the cost of individual parts, because not so many would sell and development costs need to be recouped. I wish I had an answer, but it is what it is and we cannot put the toothpaste back in the tube.

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Or we could find a Polish builder (like ACats) instead of China or UK,

Actually I think the ACat rudder price does not include the stock/gudgeons and tiller, and the main foil price certainly does not include the adjustable bearings for control system. If you add up the total of foils and immediate/attached controls, the price comparison is closer.

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If we wanted to reduce costs, a one foil rule would definitely help a lot. But I prefer to be able to have 2 foils and be able to foil in 6 knots. I think it makes the boat more enjoyable, even if more expensive

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Guys, even a single stock moth is so drastically above the true market definition of affordability that no amount of cost control measures will render much significant difference except in damaging the overall quality.  This is an expensive bird. You have to let it fly.

DRC

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The class still has rules to prevent multihulls and sailboard type rigs. Both would seem pointless now as neither types within moth overall dimensions would presently be competitive in the class. But if these rules were deleted, its conceiveble that a different and more simple moth might be developed. If Kites were allowed all existing moths would be immediately obsolete and costs would plumet. But I doubt that the existing membership would like their expensive boats to be worthless.

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19 hours ago, Phil S said:

Or we could find a Polish builder (like ACats) instead of China or UK,

Actually I think the ACat rudder price does not include the stock/gudgeons and tiller, and the main foil price certainly does not include the adjustable bearings for control system. If you add up the total of foils and immediate/attached controls, the price comparison is closer.

With the Moth it seems that we don't get the benefit of the cheap China manufacturing because we don't buy directly from the builder. This isn't a criticism of Amac, just a fact. The A Class buy their boats direct from a boatbuilder who has a low cost base. Nice for them. From what I can make out, a Moth (Exocet) and an A cost about the same to put on the water. While we complain they buy their foils cheap, they do pay over 3 times as much for their masts.

All this shows is that foiling at the top end is expensive and there is probably not a lot we can really do about it. Makes  nice hole in the market for Dave and Amac to plug with affordable foilers!

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Its a shame that much of the home building skills that made the class affordable in the early days have been lost. Being able to do your own modifications at a relatively low cost changes things somewhat. I replaced my Wand for $20, and i can get carbon fibre tiller extensions for $50. My biggest issue is time.

I think part of the problem is the perception that they are a boat for someone coming out of junior classes, whilst I encourage juniors coming in, it is not really true any more with most moth sailors having an age north of 30. If you do look at the boats though and compare it to a new 49er, a new International 14, or as Team GBR menioned, an A cat, the moth is not obscene in terms of cost and importantly it is alot expensive to ship the boats around the world. The moth is really like the expensive 1000cc roadbike you get for stress relief but with less potential for death.

And if you have someone with plenty of time (and no girlfriend) then an older hull can be rebuilt with all new foils and gear for very little.

The issue I think is time availability, and the confidence of people to even have a go at playing with a bit of carbon and glue and using their imagination.

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The most affordable foiler is still a Prowler or a Bladerider, half the price of a Wazsp, but faster, lighter and a bigger fleet to race with. 

Most moth sailors race moths because every time you go sailing it is exciting. There are a few who think its a ticket to an AC contract, but most of these do not last long unless they are exceptional sailors, get the contract and still become addicted to moths anyway. It does not matter if you are good enough to race these guys or simply normal humans back in the fleet, we all have a great time. There are plenty of cheap moths about for exciting racing mid fleet. 

The relaitve poor turn out in Bermuda is not about the cost of the class but the cost of the venue. Too expensive for the low budget moth sailors who make up more than half the fleet. 

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On 3/15/2018 at 4:21 AM, Phil S said:

2 for 6 years and in the 2017 season I spent heaps on bits including boom, sail, and foils, without geatly improving my places. Everyone gets faster at the same pace if we all upgrade together. I gave up the equipment race and sold the Mach2. 

This year I am sailng a 11 year old boat which I have improved with new systems and with a lot of the outdated gear from the Mach2. I am performing much the same, but I have about 1/3 of the $ invested in the boat. Yes I spent a lot of time and materials doing the upgrades but I am one of the old style mothies. Its a part of moth sailing which too many people are not enjoying anymore.

I was sad to see the announcement of your mach2 in your blog back then. Well, moth blogging probably would've died anyway unfortunately.

Couldn't you just build most of the upgrades for the mach2 yourself, why did you sell it?

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Owning a mach 2 is a big investment, (well it used to be before the exocet price made it look cheap). People buying a used mach2 usually assess what condition it is in and what upgrades it has had. Making changes to std Mach2 stuff risks the chance buyers will not be interested, unless you are a regatta winner, which at my age is most unlikely.

I did make some foil horizontals, a rudder and the bowsprit, but booms, sail and trampolines or beyond me. Its really hard to make good, stiff and accurate foils without professional molds and ovens. Except a few minor faults I did not see before despatch, the buyer in Munich seems happy with it.

The point i was trying to make is that moth racing is not just about beating the AC rock stars. There is a lot of fun competing at the lower levels and the price for boats below the rock star level are quite reassonable. When getting a boat from Aust to Bermuda and back costs more than the boat is worth, its obvious why there is minimal interest from my part of the world.

Aust / Europe trip costs $1000 to $1500 each way, one quote for Aust / Bermuda was $9000 each way. The regatta was sold to the class two years ago with sponsor supported freight which never eventuated as far as this part of the world goes.  

Perth in November 2019 made no such promises but interest is already high.  Expect big numbers again.

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4 hours ago, 17mika said:

Phil when is perth going to be? Jan or december 2019?

The current scheduling has the Aussie nationals starting in November 2019 and then going straight into the worlds. Same host club where Brett Burvill successfully sailed the first hydrofoil moth in a world championship event, 20 years ago almost to the day from when he fist tried to fly.

But for now, time to focus on what happens in Bermuda. Dates will be officially announced at the AGM.

 

 

2019 Worlds - logo.jpg

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Thanks punchy. I was just interested to know if it will be at the start or at the end of the year.

Let's see what news bermuda brings

Mic

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On 3/17/2018 at 6:42 PM, 17mika said:

Thanks punchy. I was just interested to know if it will be at the start or at the end of the year.

Let's see what news bermuda brings

Mic

I thought it was early Jan 2019 for the Worlds, i'm guessing the nationals would be before in Dec or over Christmas/New Year, the river is usually empty at that point.

 

Have been interested in moths for a long time and have been tempted to get a boat for this, but cost is keeping me out so far,  doubt I'll be competing but may end up getting a cheap boat for a bit of fun.

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Aust has its nationals within sailing season which in Sth hemisphere are split between calender years. 17/18 was at Wangi last January 18, 18/19 will be in Brisbane January 19, and 19/20 will be in Perth November 19 just before the worlds. Worlds are international so occur within calender years, sometimes like Belmont and Sorrento they are less than 6 month after the previous event, but this time it will be more line 18 months after Bermuda. Plenty of time for planning your trip.

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Anyone know what's going on with the Bermuda worlds? Almost zero information on the website. No press releases, news, list of entries etc.... 

 

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I predict a two horse race between goody and goobs, can't see anyone else getting close.  No others from the last top 10 will be there i believe.  Paton, bruni, bora and a few others to fight out the final podium spot.

 

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Thanks m_kiel, much obliged.

I don't see Goobs on the entry list.... late entry?

I would imagine Slingsby and Chew will be making their presence felt at the pointy end of the fleet too.

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20 minutes ago, Abbo said:

I would imagine Slingsby and Chew will be making their presence felt at the pointy end of the fleet too.

Chewie is in as representing IRL? Does the "Q" in "RQYS" no longer stand for Queensland?

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Has anybody considered a biannual schedule? It's only been eight months or so since the last one and and the Bermuda event has less attendees than last season's IC worlds. I'm happy for the IC on this front, but know for a fact that this misrepresents the pervasive quality of the moth at present. We do it every three years and it gives people time to save money.

DRC

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My understanding is Goobs is going, Slingsby is not as he has sold his boat in Aust. Not sure about Matt Chew, maybe he has borrowed an Irish boat. He has been racing Superfoilers lately. The other two Aust names listed I do not know, Never been to a nationals, so must be expats living in Nth hemisphere. Goobs has sold his boat over there so he is only paying freight one way.

Starting soon, hope the racing news makes it to Aust better than the regatta promotion material.

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5 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

Has anybody considered a biannual schedule? It's only been eight months or so since the last one and and the Bermuda event has less attendees than last season's IC worlds. I'm happy for the IC on this front, but know for a fact that this misrepresents the pervasive quality of the moth at present. We do it every three years and it gives people time to save money.

DRC

The issue isn't the frequency as such, it's the location. I never understood the idea of going to Bermuda. The turnout in Garda is a true reflection of where the class is, and if the next worlds had been somewhere people would travel to, we would have seen another great turnout. To start with, you lack a home fleet to boost numbers, plus it is expensive for everybody to get to. A worlds in the UK automatically gets over 50 local entries. Australia had about the same number of competitors at their nationals as will be at the worlds. I am excited for Perth where I would expect more Australian entries than there are total entries for Bermuda.

There needs to be a pretty compelling case to go to a venue or country where there is no local fleet and which is difficult to get to. I am not sure Bermuda ticked any boxes.

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5 minutes ago, Team_GBR said:

There needs to be a pretty compelling case to go to a venue or country where there is no local fleet and which is difficult to get to. I am not sure Bermuda ticked any boxes.

Presumably the class voted for it, maybe Phil can fill in the detail regarding competing offers?

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I did the Bermuda Race back in 98. A rum and coke at the yacht club bar was $6.50!!! The cost of living there is horrendous, and the flights are pretty crazy too so I can't imagine the freight was a bargain either. Very odd decision to host a Moth worlds there...

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Was it voted for Bermuda because everyone thought they would still be living there? :D Yeah yeah, I know, take it to AC anarchy...

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Bermuda was chosen by democratic class members vote against Argentina and Perth. The rock stars were all living there and sailng their moths on days off from AC work. They thought a local fleet was building. They also thought they would still  be there after the AC but did not count on NZ winning and ruining their lives in paradise. I have no idea what sort of local fleet remains now all the AC teams have left.

There had been a couple of local Bermuda regattas with a freight company sponsor who provided containers from UK and US. These were well attended and popular. Whoever promoted the Bermuda Worlds bid promised everyone the same free freight deal. None of the AC rock starts are on any class committees so I am not sure who the local moth reps were.

Aust voted for Perth, Argentina voted for Argentina, and pretty well every other country voted for Bermuda, based on the promises. 

Some RBYC guys came to Malcesine and chatted to a few people, but made no comittments or promises. No-one attended our AGM and no plans were revealed. This is the tradional place to anounce dates and other details one year out. Subsequently what ever freight promises were made did not seem to materialise, certainly not for Aust. In fact after Malcesine the Aust members and its association exec got few responses from queries about freight, accommodation or anything else. The air fares from Aust are 3 times that to Europe The freight was 9 times freight to europe.

There were still about 6 people talking of going at the end of 2017.  By the end of our Nationals in Jan that was down to 3, and now it looks like 2 sailors and one boat going one way only, plus a couple of expats coming from elswhere.

The year prior to Malcesine the worlds were in Japan. Japan has an active fleet and a well run class organisation. But attendance was poor, similar numbers to Bermuda. I think some Europeans wrongly feared a Tsunami or radiation polution. The Japanese ran an amazing regatta, they provided incredible support to all  the sailors, doing things for us we never imagined, like bringing our trolleys to us on the ramp after lifting our boats out of the water. Thay made not big promises, we all paid our own ways to get there, but those who went will not miss the regatta the next time they are hosts. I am not sure about costs from Europe but Japan is not a lot cheaper than Europe when travelling from Aust, at least there is no jet lag. So small regattas do happen even in great venues.

So its not the class which has a numbers issue, but Bermuda does have special issues with costs and pre regatta communication. We can only hope that this does not affect future moth worlds.

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29 minutes ago, Phil S said:

Bermuda was chosen by democratic class members vote against Argentina and Perth. The rock stars were all living there and sailng their moths on days off from AC work. They thought a local fleet was building. They also thought they would still  be there after the AC but did not count on NZ winning and ruining their lives in paradise. I have no idea what sort of local fleet remains now all the AC teams have left.

This is hilarious.

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Honestly we all tought Freight would be paid from anywhere because of sponsorship, and that the cup would stay there Anyway, so all pros would be in. We as Italian class voted almost unanimously for Bermuda at the time. With the benefit of hindsight it was a mistake. I think in the end there are 3 Italian boats going; 1 AC helm, the IMCA president , and 1 Italian who lives in Belgium.

I agree with what other mothies say. Perth 2019 will be back to "normal".

 

 

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Well, at least in northern Italy, finally this weekend it seems like this bloody winter/freezing/windless weather will be over, so it may be a good time to actually spend some time on the water, hence ending this glorious period of winter armchair sailing :) 

Michele

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On 19/3/2018 at 11:17 AM, GSJ said:

I predict a two horse race between goody and goobs, can't see anyone else getting close.  No others from the last top 10 will be there i believe.  Paton, bruni, bora and a few others to fight out the final podium spot.

 

Yup I agree. 

Just some more unsubstantiated rumours on the other 3 above, to give something to talk:

  • Bora, as always when he seriously commits to a Worlds, will have for sure something new in his kit that he will show to the world on monday morning :D. expect the unexpected.
  • Checco Bruni, for the first time, is coming to a worlds with a good training (much more focused than he was in Garda). Maybe not a contender for the win, but I'll count him in for a possible top 3. in Garda he sailed very well but he did not have the boatspeed; he may have it now.
  • Patonator is always there at the top and Bermuda is his second home. Do not count him out.

I like to think it will be Goobs time to win a worlds, cause he is such a great sailor, often hidden under the shade of Outerridge, but unless someone has a secret weapon in the bag (Bora?), I simply cannot see Goodison losing it.

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On 3/15/2018 at 7:24 PM, Team_GBR said:

With the Moth it seems that we don't get the benefit of the cheap China manufacturing because we don't buy directly from the builder. This isn't a criticism of Amac, just a fact. The A Class buy their boats direct from a boatbuilder who has a low cost base. Nice for them. From what I can make out, a Moth (Exocet) and an A cost about the same to put on the water. While we complain they buy their foils cheap, they do pay over 3 times as much for their masts.

All this shows is that foiling at the top end is expensive and there is probably not a lot we can really do about it. Makes  nice hole in the market for Dave and Amac to plug with affordable foilers!

I wanted to clarify this statement a bit. I've made the same statement before here and been (rightfully) burned by a top moth manufacturer, whose pricing was available for me to compare. The price of a complete set of A-Cat boards and rudders including slider plates, gudgeons and rudder castings is a little bit under $4k usd from the Polish builder. This is everything needed to do a conversion and get your boat on the water. The builder in Holland is closer to $4k usd for a set of boards only.

I should add that while both builder offer some after sales support I don't think its quite the same as Amac or the rest of the Moth builders, so there is some get what you pay for going on. Fortunately I haven't seen issues with either A-Cat builders boats in terms of durability etc., as long as you don't do something stupid breakdowns are rare. At the moment I would say the top A cat guys are buying boards and sails every year, new rigs every 2-3 years but those have been standardized for a few years now so mostly its just new rig when you get a new boat. The running costs are pretty similar to the F18 running costs, new boat price is ~30-40% higher.  Part of me hopes the development pushes the envelope but a big part of me hopes we don't end up having the same cost discussion that is going on here.

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Amac is concentrating his business on WASZP growth. In Jan this year he told me he was selling only about one Mach2 a month and that was not viable for the factory, which is set up for continuous production. He did not bring SOS or the support workshop to our nationals as the Mach2 business no longer can afford it. His latest releases for Mach2 upgrades are production versions of the develpoments pre Malcesine, eg, decksweeper rig, macita type main foil.

The market is changing, the Exocet WC domination has killed the new Mach2 market but since Exocet producion is slow, there are several other smaller builders now offering alternative boats or about to release them, mostly in the UK. Also there are some very fast new foils coming along as well, from other parts of the world. Some of this kit may appear this week, we will see what is at the front of the fleet.

Regardless there are a huge number of very good moths out there which are all upgradable with newer foils and rigs. The class will be strong for a long time yet while people continue to put thoight and effort into continuous improvements.

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Yup I agree. 

Just some more unsubstantiated rumours on the other 3 above, to give something to talk:

  • Bora, as always when he seriously commits to a Worlds, will have for sure something new in his kit that he will show to the world on monday morning :D. expect the unexpected.
  • Checco Bruni, for the first time, is coming to a worlds with a good training (much more focused than he was in Garda). Maybe not a contender for the win, but I'll count him in for a possible top 3. in Garda he sailed very well but he did not have the boatspeed; he may have it now.
  • Patonator is always there at the top and Bermuda is his second home. Do not count him out.

I like to think it will be Goobs time to win a worlds, cause he is such a great sailor, often hidden under the shade of Outerridge, but unless someone has a secret weapon in the bag (Bora?), I simply cannot see Goodison losing it.

Some preliminary racing in Florida a couple of weeks ago...

http://usmothclass.com/2018-us-nationals-recap-struble-wins/

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Few videos from the last couple of days.

Bermuds nats day 1 

 

Bermuda nats day 2 (no sailing): 

 

 

Good luck to everybody to stay close to Goodison; chat I heard is that he is uncatchable.

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6 hours ago, aardvark_issues said:

So, is it normally like this?

.....this just in...........   http://www.mothworlds.org/bermuda/       Don't see the big Guglari on that entry list.  Typo, or no-show?

BACARDI MOTH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP POSTPONED DUE TO STRONG WINDSHAMILTON, Bermuda (Mar. 26, 2018) — Day 1 of the Bacardi Moth World Championship in Bermuda was postponed today due to gale force winds.

A low pressure to the southwest of the island intensified overnight and brought heavy rains in the early morning hours and northwesterly winds steadily in the mid-20s with gusts of 40 knots.

“I’ve had a number of people ask what the course is, which is disturbing,” said Principal Race Officer David Campbell-James. “But we’ve decided the chance of racing today is nil so we’ve abandoned for the day.”

James has also issued an amendment to the sailing instructions that allow him to run up to four races per day.

“Since we’ve lost three races today we’ll try and do one extra race per day over the next three days to get back on schedule. That will allow us to keep the reserve day on Friday, Good Friday, which is a big holiday in Bermuda.”

The postponement affords competitors an extra day of tinkering with their boat and equipment. Mothists are renowned for constantly modifying their equipment and the world championship is the time to put those developments on display.

Ebullient Frenchman Benoit Marie, a naval engineer by trade, has designed and built a new boom in conjunction with European aeronautical giant Airbus. The boom attempts to make better use of the deck sweeper mainsail that is becoming common in the class. Class rules place maximums on sail area and luff length and the deck sweeper places more sail down low off the luff, between the gooseneck and boom vang.

“The boom is a bit heavier, maybe 2 or 3 kilograms,” said Marie. “I built it a little heavier so that it wouldn’t break. In future models we’ll lighten it up.”

The fleet features mainsails from KA, Lennon and North. The designs are trending on the flatter side to increase upwind performance but might come at a cost downwind.

“I’ve got a new North 3DI deck sweeper sail, similar to what KA is doing,” said Iain Jensen, who is a contender for the world championship after placing third last year. “It seems to go quite well above 12 knots but feels like its missing a little bit of grunt in the lighter winds.”

Jensen’s boom also has a plate on top of the outboard end to help clean up the end plate effect, similar (on a much smaller scale) to what the America’s Cup catamarans were attempting. Jensen said that the lack of grunt might be due to the lower rig height that’s necessary to accommodate the deck sweeper main.

“Due to the max luff length if you want sail area down low you have to cut some off the top,” said Jensen. “It’s only a few mils, but it feels like it’s missing the area at the top.”

Jensen, Paul Goodison of the U.K. and American Brad Funk are using the higher angle wing racks in an attempt to gain righting moment to increase straight line speed.

“I got the higher angle bars about the same time as the deck sweeper and noticed a big increase in righting moment,” said Jensen.

Underwater, Matt Struble of the U.S. has been designing and building new foils in the holy grail chase of more lift and less drag. Stuble, who won the U.S. Nationals three weeks ago in Florida, has been working with a retired aeronautical engineer in San Diego, estimates he has designed and built nine sets of foils.

“The best part is none of them have broken,” said Struble, who’s hoping to win the Masters’ division at the Worlds. “They all seem to go well. We’ve been looking at sail planes, increase span, reduced chord lengths, aspect ratios, all of that stuff. I think they’re working quite well.”

The Moth World Championship and Bermuda Nationals are made possible with the support of title sponsor Bacardi Limited, the largest privately held spirits company in the world that produces and markets internationally recognized spirits and wines. The Bacardi brand portfolio comprises more than 200 brands and labels, including BACARDÍ® rum, GREY GOOSE® vodka, DEWAR’S® Blended Scotch whisky, BOMBAY SAPPHIRE® gin, MARTINI® vermouth and sparkling wines, CAZADORES® 100% blue agave tequila, and other leading and emerging brands including WILLIAM LAWSON’S® Blended Scotch whisky, ERISTOFF® vodka, and ST-GERMAIN® elderflower liqueur.

Founded nearly 156 years ago, in Santiago de Cuba on February 4, 1862, family-owned Bacardi currently employs approximately 5,500, operates more than 20 production facilities, including bottling, distilling and manufacturing sites, and sells its brands in more than 170 countries.

The BACARDÍ® brand is part of the portfolio of Bacardi Limited, headquartered in Hamilton, Bermuda. Bacardi Limited refers to the Bacardi group of companies, including Bacardi International Limited. For more information visit www.Bacardi.com.

Bacardi Moth World Championship Bermuda Entrant List
Alex Adams (GBR), Kai Adolph (GER, Master’s), Vanessa Ampelas (FRA, Women’s), Francisco Andrade (POR), Aymeric Arthaud (FRA), Nathan Bailey (BER), Michael Barnes (GBR), Andrew Brazier (CAN), Francesco Bruni (ITA), Philipp Buhl (GER), Scott Bursor (USA), Matthew Chew (AUS), Victor Diaz de Leon (USA), Brad Funk (USA), Harmen Donker (NED), James Doughty (BER), Rory Fitzpatrick (IRL), Zane Gills (AUS, Master’s), Paul Goodison (GBR), Joshua Greenslade (BER), Ted Hackney (AUS), Simon Hiscocks (GBR, Master’s), David Holenweg (SUI), Chris Jeeves (GBR), Iain Jensen (AUS), Andreas John (GER, Master’s), David Kenefick (IRL), Rome Kirby (USA), Christian Luthi (BER, Master’s), Benoit Marie (FRA), Zack Maxam (USA), Jim McMillan (GBR), Rob Partridge (HKG), Ben Paton (GBR), Brooks Read (USA), James Ross (GBR, Master’s), Dennis Sargenti (USA), Philippe Schiller (SUI), Andrew Scrivan (USA), Benn Smith (BER, Youth), Dave Smithwhite (GBR, Master’s), Kyle Stoneham (GBR), Matt Struble (USA, Master’s), Dan Ward (GBR)

 

...and the run-up event..........

GREENSLADE WINS BACARDI MOTH BERMUDA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

HAMILTON, Bermuda (Mar. 24, 2018) — Joshua Greenslade has won the Bacardi Moth Bermuda National Championship.

Racing for the championship was cancelled today due to very strong winds, so Greenslade won based on yesterday’s results. Greenslade finished 1 point ahead of James Doughty while Benn Smith, the youngest competitor in the fleet at 18 years of age, was 11 points further back.

“It’s a strange win, considering we only had three races, but it was fun,” said the 27-year-old Greenslade who’s a director of the Endeavour Community Sailing Program, a legacy of the America’s Cup Endeavour program. Previously, Greenslade won national championships in the Optimist Class, 420 Class and match racing.

 

Racing was cancelled today because the wind on Great Sound was blowing a steady 25 knots with gusts approaching 40 knots. With the Bacardi Moth World Championship scheduled to begin Monday, Principal Race Officer David Campbell-Smith felt it was an easy decision.

“There really was no reason to send anyone out today. It’s just too windy,” said Campbell-James.

Even if racing had been held, Greenslade wasn’t sure he would’ve been able to race. He had troubles yesterday with the bow-mounted wand that helps control the hydrofoiling characteristic that is the hallmark of the Moth class.

“The wand was sticking at a certain point due to some resistance and it wasn’t reacting the way I wanted it to,” Greenslade said. “I don’t feel like I sailed that well yesterday considering the boat wasn’t performing as well as it usually does, but it was fun being out there. The fleet is so strong, the Worlds should be a very tough regatta.”

British sailor Paul Goodison, the favorite to win his third consecutive Moth world championship, won the regatta overall with the low score of 3 points. Another British sailor, Ben Paton, placed second and Matthew Chew of Australia was third. The Bermuda Nationals was an open regatta but the title of Bermuda National Champion could only be awarded to a Bermudian.

The Moth World Championship and Bermuda Nationals are made possible with the support of title sponsor Bacardi Limited, the largest privately held spirits company in the world that produces and markets internationally recognized spirits and wines. The Bacardi brand portfolio comprises more than 200 brands and labels, including BACARDÍ® rum, GREY GOOSE® vodka, DEWAR’S® Blended Scotch whisky, BOMBAY SAPPHIRE® gin, MARTINI® vermouth and sparkling wines, CAZADORES® 100% blue agave tequila, and other leading and emerging brands including WILLIAM LAWSON’S® Blended Scotch whisky, ERISTOFF® vodka, and ST-GERMAIN® elderflower liqueur.

Founded nearly 156 years ago, in Santiago de Cuba on February 4, 1862, family-owned Bacardi currently employs approximately 5,500, operates more than 20 production facilities, including bottling, distilling and manufacturing sites, and sells its brands in more than 170 countries.

The BACARDÍ® brand is part of the portfolio of Bacardi Limited, headquartered in Hamilton, Bermuda. Bacardi Limited refers to the Bacardi group of companies, including Bacardi International Limited. For more information visit www.Bacardi.com.

Bacardi Bermuda Moth National Championship Final Standings
(After 3 races)
1. Paul Goodison (U.K.) 1-1-1 – 3 points
2. Ben Paton (U.K.) 2-2-6 – 10
3. Matthew Chew (AUS) 6-5-3 – 14
4. Rome Kirby (USA) 3-3-10 – 16
5. Simon Hiscocks (U.K.) 7-8-2 – 17
23. Joshua Greenslade (BER) 26-24-23 – 73
24. James Doughty (BER) 25-25-24 – 74
27. Benn Smith (BER) 27-23-DNF (35) – 85
29. Nathan Bailey (BER) DNC (35)-DNC (35)-20 – 90

 

 

 

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is tom slingsby racing in the worlds?

he had a pretty good setup on his brand new exocet and he trained a fair bit with goobs so he'd probably be up there with the top guys

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nope Slingsby not racing.

Goodie is killing it in the big breeze today. Footage should be fun :)

29542700_1859317380767126_45267773178873

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I heard 3rd hand that there was some sort of start line incident which took out a large number of boats from both races.

 

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2 hours ago, Phil S said:

I heard 3rd hand that there was some sort of start line incident which took out a large number of boats from both races.

 

Yes, about half the fleet DNC in the second race. Must have been quite something.

Brad Funk is in second place with two thirds.

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4 hours ago, 17mika said:

nope Slingsby not racing.

Goodie is killing it in the big breeze today. Footage should be fun :)

29542700_1859317380767126_45267773178873

goobs was winning until he broke his vang:(

 

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Day 2 great video: 

Weather forecasts look terrible, basically no wind from today to sunday. Let's see.

 

 

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Ouch, looks like Struble and a number of other sailors were taken out of the competition? Any more details beyond "start line incident"?

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7 hours ago, samc99us said:

Ouch, looks like Struble and a number of other sailors were taken out of the competition? Any more details beyond "start line incident"?

what day did this happen?

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Weather's looking terrible. Max wind expected in the next 3 days is 6 knots. This could be the shortest worlds ever.

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