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Unkle Crusty

Safety gear

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Bought a Viking 33 in 009. Rewyred 110 and 12 volt systems. Have the cooker and fridge, plus a beer fridge, solar panels and all the stuff needed for cruising. Plenty of sails, checked the rig, Yanmar runs fine. Went around Vancouver Island in 017, only small problem a leaky water pump.

Next step we think, we being Admiral Shirley and me, Unkle Krusty. We decided the next step is safety gear. A life raft and personal EPIRBs likely on the top of the list. I thought a manual water maker would be handy, but that can wait a bit, just like rebuilding the rudder. Any suggestions and recommendations would be welcome. Vancouver Boat Show is getting close.

Unkle Krusty

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Forget personal EPIRBS - get personal AIS units!  Who do you want knowing your position - the boat you just fell of off or a satellite/some rescue center thousands of miles away??

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Totally agree with that. If one of you go in, a personal AIS and a receiver on the boat gives you a good chance of finding & recovering someone. EPIRBs are too slow but are great if you are a long way from  VHFs are now available with AIS receivers built in (and they have a nice map showing where the AIS target is). They are also useful in avoiding big sips in the fog.

If you are going around Vancouver Island again or much further afield, then yes an EPIRB or Personal EPIRB would be wise. Crossing oceans? EPIRB.

A manual watermaker should be very low on your list of priorities. If you take to a liferaft and boat sinks, an EPIRB and a 5 gal jerry jug of water will most likely see you rescued long before you unpack the watermaker.

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4 hours ago, Unkle Crusty said:

Bought a Viking 33 in 009. Rewyred 110 and 12 volt systems. Have the cooker and fridge, plus a beer fridge, solar panels and all the stuff needed for cruising. Plenty of sails, checked the rig, Yanmar runs fine. Went around Vancouver Island in 017, only small problem a leaky water pump.

Next step we think, we being Admiral Shirley and me, Unkle Krusty. We decided the next step is safety gear. A life raft and personal EPIRBs likely on the top of the list. I thought a manual water maker would be handy, but that can wait a bit, just like rebuilding the rudder. Any suggestions and recommendations would be welcome. Vancouver Boat Show is getting close.

Unkle Krusty

Well crusty... min. safety gear is specified by your geographic area of operation.  You must be one hundred percent compliant. 

as for practical , add some extra stuff to be even safer ...the number one is communications.   

Again.. I  dont know your area of operation , but the mobile phone is a very potent safey device for coastal sailing 

when the shit hits the fan...a medical emergency for instance...that phone will save your life 

to extend mobile phone range, internet connection , you can use an amplifier  external  antenna.

with my amplifier I get a connection  when well offshore and inshore when plauged by coverage shadows. 

 

you should ask your electronic guy about  amplifier options for your area. 

The setup is not cheap..

http://www.globalmarinenet.com/product/gmn-recommended-marine-cell-booster/

i know nothing of this brand...its only a google hit .  My unit is Siemens 

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13 hours ago, Unkle Crusty said:

but that can wait a bit, just like rebuilding the rudder.

what shape is the rudder in? Just a few leaks into it, or bearing/support issues?

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Got radar I assume?  And some way to display AIS & radar at the wheel when shorthanded.  Handheld VHF, safety knife, strobe etc well attached to personal lifejacket with harness.

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Thank you fellow boaters.

Longy: I will study personal AIS and EPIRBS.  Zonker: We have AIS receiving thru the VHF radio, and onscreen with the chart plotter. New antenna at top of the mast with new cable.

Slug. We take 2 cell phones, but run out of coverage often. We have been talking about an amplifier / cell phone booster. Will check the posted link.

Wick: The rudder is the original stock unit. Stainless steel shaft on simple bearings that are all okay. We can even drop the rudder while in the puddle. It is the crappy shape, and that it absorbs water, that makes me want to rebuild around the shaft, and whatever is inside the old one. The Viking 34 ( same hull ) has a newer style and more balanced rudder. Have not found drawings so far, but it is easy enough to draw.

H2O: We have paper charts for all the areas we go. We have a Simrad chart plotter, and now a smaller Lowrance as a back up. We know exactly where the rock is that we hit near Nanaimo in August 017.

GMD: We need a new hand held as the batteries are not available for the old one. Have harnesses for all aboard and jack lines. The Admiral says she can make French toast.

Kenny: We have radar, used it lots in the thick fog on the left hand side of Vancouver Island. Chilly and foggy. Which reminds me. The bloody diesel heater quit. We have the knife handy.

Any thoughts on the type / brand of life raft? I might want to go to Hawaii or Mexico, or further in the future. I am still a young guy of 71. I will also build an emergency rudder.

I built a swim grid with a drop down ladder. So can retrieve someone from the puddle. Admiral Shirley is under 110 pounds which helps with her.  She stays low in the cockpit on bumpy days. I wear a life jacket and safety harness. Have not fallen in so far, but there is always time.

Unkle Krusty

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   Pick up a copy of the Offshore Safety rules as required for all offshore racing. Most regs in their  are a direct result of lost boats. You may choose not to do all the requirements, but you will be aware of all the possibilities.

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2 minutes ago, longy said:

   Pick up a copy of the Offshore Safety rules as required for all offshore racing. Most regs in their  are a direct result of lost boats. You may choose not to do all the requirements, but you will be aware of all the possibilities.

Good idea I will get that. I have some of the stuff required by the Swiftsure Race, but it needs to be reviewed.

Scuttling a boat because of a rudder failure seems silly to me. First the main rudder, later the emergency rudder. The mast is quite solid, rigging all good. Have checked the keel bolts thoroughly. Ballast is 50% of displacement. The boat is solid and in good shape. Have Audrey the auto helm, but would also like a wind controlled self steering device. I get bored steering.

Unkle Krusty

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Designed by C&C, nice boat.  Maybe think about how to jettison the rig if it all falls down?  Survivable if you can unload it, but otherwise, could wind up on the rocks in the places you're playing.  

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9 hours ago, Unkle Crusty said:

Thank you fellow boaters.

Longy: I will study personal AIS and EPIRBS.  Zonker: We have AIS receiving thru the VHF radio, and onscreen with the chart plotter. New antenna at top of the mast with new cable.

Slug. We take 2 cell phones, but run out of coverage often. We have been talking about an amplifier / cell phone booster. Will check the posted link.

Wick: The rudder is the original stock unit. Stainless steel shaft on simple bearings that are all okay. We can even drop the rudder while in the puddle. It is the crappy shape, and that it absorbs water, that makes me want to rebuild around the shaft, and whatever is inside the old one. The Viking 34 ( same hull ) has a newer style and more balanced rudder. Have not found drawings so far, but it is easy enough to draw.

H2O: We have paper charts for all the areas we go. We have a Simrad chart plotter, and now a smaller Lowrance as a back up. We know exactly where the rock is that we hit near Nanaimo in August 017.

GMD: We need a new hand held as the batteries are not available for the old one. Have harnesses for all aboard and jack lines. The Admiral says she can make French toast.

Kenny: We have radar, used it lots in the thick fog on the left hand side of Vancouver Island. Chilly and foggy. Which reminds me. The bloody diesel heater quit. We have the knife handy.

Any thoughts on the type / brand of life raft? I might want to go to Hawaii or Mexico, or further in the future. I am still a young guy of 71. I will also build an emergency rudder.

I built a swim grid with a drop down ladder. So can retrieve someone from the puddle. Admiral Shirley is under 110 pounds which helps with her.  She stays low in the cockpit on bumpy days. I wear a life jacket and safety harness. Have not fallen in so far, but there is always time.

Unkle Krusty

Your observation concerning a boarding ladder is correct. Robust .  No nonsense. Proper handholds.   You should be able to climb aboard injured, cold,  heavy with gear.

deck illumination is also ctitical...working on deck at night...identifing your boat to others when anchored in bad weather.  Generally this means spreader and boom lights.  A single , allround anchor light is usless when anchored with backround city lighting ...you are invisable...just one more little white light in a sea of lights 

A masthead strobe light is a very effective signaling light when crossing shipping lanes in heavy weather or  for notifying other vessels that you are not under command.  

An underwater light ..thru hull...that illuminates  the propellor and rudder is useful.  

Ground tackle...anchoring needs to be well thought out.  You must be able to single handed drive the boat and retrieve the anchor at the same time

 

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Kenny: The mast is a substantial single spreader rig. Probably stay upright without shrouds. A battery powered angle grinder could be added to the tool box. That could cut the wyres and the mast. There are more rocks, and coves, and inlets and small Islands, around all sides of Vancouver Island, than can be imagined.

Slug: We have a mast head tricolour as well as the normal deck lights. Both on separate switches. We have the forward facing steaming light, and a not too bright deck light further up the mast. And a spot light with a long cord. I could add the strobe up high the next time the mast is out. It is getting quite full inside with 3 halyards, the antenna wyre and the mast head light wyre. Plus the topping lift ( pole up ) a bit further down. There is also anti rattle material inside which also clogs things. Topping lift pulls up the storm jib / stay sail. We were at anchor about 50 times in 017, in all kinds of places. Dragged once as we were on a pile of kelp. That was the only panic type action stations event so far. We carry spare Danforth at the blunt end. A manual anchor winch at the moment for me to get my daily exercise. An electric unit later.

Kenny: I had not thought about a line cutter. But a wet suit is on my list, primarily to scrub the bottom and fondle the prop. I use a Slipstream 2 bladed Stainless prop. Tried a 3 bladed Kiwi prop that the boat did not like. With new engine mounts and a switch to the Slipstream, we picked up about a knot of top speed.

Unkle Krusty

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Mast is similar to the one I dropped in the middle of the Straights one nice afternoon.  Saw the SS chainplate fly right up through the deck like a salmon flasher.  Dry rot on the internal plywood bulkhead.  Nice easy day / weather and it was still a very fucked up experience.  Angle grinder is a good idea but a punch and hammer is pretty quick for driving pins out.

Prop spurs work but need to be installed correctly, right in front of the prop.  Way safer than diving with a knife.  And unlike drifting logs, the crab pots don't sink at night.

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Hi Unkle Krusty. Regarding AIS/EPIRBs.

 

When off shore all of our crew uses:

MOB1 which is super easy to program to your boats NAV system and also blasts a DSC transmission. It fits nicely in your PFD (attaches to the manual inflator tube). We have practiced with it and it works just fine. Problem is it’s only programmed to your nav system so if they can’t get back to you, and no one else is around to pick up your VHF signal, you are still floating around quite alone.

So, we also all carry our own ResQLink+ PLB system.

http://oceansignal.com/products/mob1/

https://www.acrartex.com/products/catalog/personal-locator-beacons/resqlinkplus/#sthash.Qia4Ujrp.dpbs

 

So far so good......

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The reality is that you only know of defects or missing  safety equipment, like a hand hold or a light , after you have used the boat.  

Soon, after doing something seven days week, it becomes obvious.

out in the ocean everything happens slow, there is nothing to smash into, if things get stressful you can just take the sails down and float around.  On the coast its different 

most acidents, bad days, happen on the coast

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For nearshore consider a SPOT or Delorme - they have useful long range communication features for things other than when the shit hits the fan and can summon help fairly quickly.  VHF radio with DSC and GPS is a good idea too because it is often the local folks that are going to get to you first.  I'm assuming you are towing some kind of dinghy which could be a raft for a while if it all goes pear-shaped.

Offshore, raft and EPIRB are the way to go.

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Kenny. Bummer about your lost rig. The chain plates seem quite secure. The stock rig has a baby stay, but the angle does not allow it to pull the must forward near the middle. So the mast pumps. Better to have 2 forward lowers IMO. So I moved the deck attachment point further forward and can now induce a small amount of prebend, and that fixes the pumping. Good for cruising, no good for racing with the spinnaker. The storm jib / stay sail goes on the baby stay wyre. Pole up line gets used as the halyard. We have managed to slug the odd log. But of course, never at night. A hit log spun off the Kiwi prop on Gary's Catalina 38. Some places the bloody crab pots are worse than a nuisance.

Sadug: I have saved those links. Thank you. Will study later.

Slug: We have been on the boat a minimum of one month every year since 009. Have raised the water line about four inches. Discovered the drain for the propane bottle got submerged when we were loaded. The drain was not accessible, so I plugged it, and put in a new one higher up. Only realized that 2 years ago.

Dash 34. Usually have a rolled up rubber ducky just behind the mast. That will get replaced by the life raft in the canister. We also carry two kayaks that can float free. They stay put surprisingly well. I usually do not tow a dinky. Am considering cutting in half, my small sailing dinky and carrying it on the swim grid. If that plan does not work, then the rolled up rubber ducky could sit on the swim grid. Naturally a much bigger boat would help with storage space, and deplete the rainy day fund in short order.

We have, or will soon, spend more money on stuff, than the boat is worth.

Unkle Krusty

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4 minutes ago, Unkle Crusty said:

Kenny. Bummer about your lost rig. The chain plates seem quite secure. The stock rig has a baby stay, but the angle does not allow it to pull the must forward near the middle. So the mast pumps. Better to have 2 forward lowers IMO. So I moved the deck attachment point further forward and can now induce a small amount of prebend, and that fixes the pumping. Good for cruising, no good for racing with the spinnaker. The storm jib / stay sail goes on the baby stay wyre. Pole up line gets used as the halyard. We have managed to slug the odd log. But of course, never at night. A hit log spun off the Kiwi prop on Gary's Catalina 38. Some places the bloody crab pots are worse than a nuisance.

Sadug: I have saved those links. Thank you. Will study later.

Slug: We have been on the boat a minimum of one month every year since 009. Have raised the water line about four inches. Discovered the drain for the propane bottle got submerged when we were loaded. The drain was not accessible, so I plugged it, and put in a new one higher up. Only realized that 2 years ago.

Dash 34. Usually have a rolled up rubber ducky just behind the mast. That will get replaced by the life raft in the canister. We also carry two kayaks that can float free. They stay put surprisingly well. I usually do not tow a dinky. Am considering cutting in half, my small sailing dinky and carrying it on the swim grid. If that plan does not work, then the rolled up rubber ducky could sit on the swim grid. Naturally a much bigger boat would help with storage space, and deplete the rainy day fund in short order.

We have, or will soon, spend more money on stuff, than the boat is worth.

Unkle Krusty

Yup crusty....plenty of stuff on boats ....in a few more years that waterline will need to be raised  once again 

it just the way it is ....

and remember to check the water depth under the keel....or you could load that baby into the mud forever 

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On 1/6/2018 at 9:59 AM, slug zitski said:

Yup crusty....plenty of stuff on boats ....in a few more years that waterline will need to be raised  once again 

it just the way it is ....

and remember to check the water depth under the keel....or you could load that baby into the mud forever 

We did that too. Narrow channel into the Sidney North Sanich, heading in. 4 fizz boats and one sail boat came around the corner heading out. It stayed right, tried to spot a marker at our back right and line it up with one ahead. Moved right a tad more and stuck it in the mud. I usually qualify for a beer when we successfully tie up or anchor. We were not going anywhere, and we were close to the dock, seemed good enough for me. Tide was coming in, 20 minutes later we backed off. Have to remember this thing is not like the Tanzer 22.

All the way around the big island, pulled into many tiny coves, did not hit anything, then slug the bottom twice near home. The mud had no effect, but the rock knocked out some filler down low, and made a few cracks in the filler up high. All fixed and it was a good opportunity to study the keel bolts. I think a hard hit at 7 knots would do some serious damage.

We unload the boat each year after the most excellent summer cruise. Then think carefully about what goes back on. Which is much more than expected, when the boat was designed. I had to move some of the annoying sailing related deck gear, to make room for the junk, I mean quality cruising stuff.

Unkle Krusty

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On 1/5/2018 at 7:44 PM, slug zitski said:

A masthead strobe light is a very effective signaling light when crossing shipping lanes in heavy weather or  for notifying other vessels that you are not under command.  

WTF? 

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Fire extinguishers?  First aid kits? Cone plugs? I reckon that boats typically can sink or burn, and people get injured - more often than they fall off them.

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Re  : Mast Head Strobes

See the COLREGS (Rules 20, 21, & 36)
http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/boating/colregs.html

- Rule 36
Signals to Attract Attention

If necessary to attract the attention of another vessel, any vessel may make light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized elsewhere in these Rules, or may direct the beam of her searchlight in the direction of the danger, in such a way as not to embarrass any vessel. Any light to attract the attention of another vessel shall be such that it cannot be mistaken for any aid to navigation. For the purpose of this Rule the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided.

 

...........................

 

Re : NUC

(a)     A vessel not under command shall exhibit:

(i)      two all-round red lights in a vertical line where they can best be seen;

(ii)     two balls or similar shapes in a vertical line where they can best be seen;

(iii)    when making way through the water, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, sidelights and a sternlight.

 

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There is no end to the list, all good ideas (well, mostly, as noted).

At the top of the list I would recommend drills that practice the use of such safety appliances.

Next on the list I would recommend a safe boating course, a good one, specific to the type of boating you do.

Five years of Coast Guard search and rescue work have lead me to such opinion.

Fair winds.

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Bow Girl: We have all that. I have even done a fair bit of work on the pointy end. Easy to spot me, I wear gaudy surfer baggies.

Barf Bag. Been there, done all that. May or may not have said hi when I was in Victoria. Boat was at the dock next to the fish place. Was a member of the Provincial Emergency Program a few years ago.

Ishmael: Safety Course looks good. I will try and plan for that. I surfed for many years, including at Sunset Beach. So I have an idea about upside down in big waves. Read the Fastnet Report about the problems with life boats. Was hoping some would share some life raft suggestions. I have had two near death drowning experiences. One at the beach where they dropped off the piano in the movie. The Kiwis will know where that is. Another while rescuing a kid at another surf beach. My conclusion is it is easier to die, than it is to stay alive, and that warm salt water is easier than cold fresh water.

I have also spend time chatting with guys like the owner of Snow White Two, in NZ. Snow Whit One got hit by a whale and went down in 90 seconds. Read Digby Taylor's account of his boat sinking.

The very first boat we built as kids sank, with me as the test pilot.

Unkle Krusty

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18 hours ago, Mid said:

Re  : Mast Head Strobes

See the COLREGS (Rules 20, 21, & 36)
http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/boating/colregs.html

- Rule 36
Signals to Attract Attention

If necessary to attract the attention of another vessel, any vessel may make light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized elsewhere in these Rules, or may direct the beam of her searchlight in the direction of the danger, in such a way as not to embarrass any vessel. Any light to attract the attention of another vessel shall be such that it cannot be mistaken for any aid to navigation. For the purpose of this Rule the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided.

 

...........................

 

Re : NUC

(a)     A vessel not under command shall exhibit:

(i)      two all-round red lights in a vertical line where they can best be seen;

(ii)     two balls or similar shapes in a vertical line where they can best be seen;

(iii)    when making way through the water, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, sidelights and a sternlight.

 

Maybe some people have to use a strobe because they don't have a pair of balls.

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In our offshore races here in Queensland competitors must carry a PLB whenever on deck and a mouth guard once in the beer tent.

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Aww jezz...youre a  copy  and paste barstool sailor.   

A quick flash is used to attract attention. Long line bouys, restricted zones, moorings , pipelines, construction zones....

a  masthead strobe accomplishes this task .  

no need  to hoist a status light chain up the mast when its blowing a gale

no need to drop sails and give 360 degree visabily to your Attention signal 

on the sea you can fly ..in addition to navigation lights ..ANY LIGHT YOU WANT...a thousand lights to illuminate your vessel 

 

 

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it's semi-common on the west coast of BC/USA for fishing boats to turn on a strobe light and drift while the crew goes to sleep. 

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Strobe light are used in many situations.

 

inshore... at night you are in your rubber tender and you fire off the strobe to keep from getting run down by high speed traffic

 

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For offshore/nighttime I have a personal AIS.

I would recommend the Safety at Sea course if you plan on taking boat to Mexico or Hawaii.

For the van isle coast, an excellent handheld backup gps in addition to your plotter, it's a nasty coastline to be using dead reckoning. Should be able to find one at Boat show.  

If you go offshore think about having all your vital information with someone who knows how to get it to the joint rescue centres effectively.

 

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36 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Aww jezz...youre a  copy  and paste barstool sailor.   

A quick flash is used to attract attention. Long line bouys, restricted zones, moorings , pipelines, construction zones....

a  masthead strobe accomplishes this task .  

no need  to hoist a status light chain up the mast when its blowing a gale

no need to drop sails and give 360 degree visabily to your Attention signal 

on the sea you can fly ..in addition to navigation lights ..ANY LIGHT YOU WANT...a thousand lights to illuminate your vessel 

 

 

No those quick flashes are called special marks. Purse seine fishing boats may display two alternately flashing yellow. Is there a wanking forum you can post in? You should stick to subjects that you know something about. 

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29 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Strobe light are used in many situations.

 

inshore... at night you are in your rubber tender and you fire off the strobe to keep from getting run down by high speed traffic

 

If it a white strobe they will all keep north of you. But you keep doing it. It is good to identify a clueless dill in a dinghy.

 

44 minutes ago, Zonker said:

it's semi-common on the west coast of BC/USA for fishing boats to turn on a strobe light and drift while the crew goes to sleep. 

Is that in the colregs as a vessel not obeying the colregs?

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Enough of forum trash...ths is crusties safety thread.

every year folks die in dingies..thier motor breaks down, runs out of gas, offshore wind....two weeks later they find the dingy and its dead crew.... eaten by seagulls . Onshore wind and the crew get smashed in the breakers..

very important that you carry an anchor and a very long anchor rode.   At least 100 meters of thin stuff plus an anchor that really works. 

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5 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Enough of forum trash...ths is crusties safety thread.

every year folks die in dingies..thier motor breaks down, runs out of gas, offshore wind....two weeks later they find the dingy and its dead crew.... eaten by seagulls . Onshore wind and the crew get smashed in the breakers..

very important that you carry an anchor and a very long anchor rode.   At least 100 meters of thin stuff plus an anchor that really works. 

Excellent point.  The west coast of van isle has claimed lots of boats. A great anchor is very important.

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Irish: We have all. For our Van Isle cruise, we discovered the chip in Simmy, did not have detail for the end of Brooks, or Race passage. Plus Simmy started doing funny things. We now have a new and slightly bigger Simrad under warranty, a smaller Lowrance plotter, Navionics on an I pad tablet and my Samsung tablet, and a hand held GPS. For the Kiwis, this is the kind of equipment required to navigate the Posonby Pub, AKA the Glue Pot. Admiral Shirley will have all my details if we go offshore in a couple of years. She will fly. We also have radar, which was needed in the fog.

LB: Fishing boats can be a hazard everywhere, day or night. In 017 one was in the shipping lanes in the Juan de Fuca. Got warned often there was a freighter up his tail pipe. My plan in the beer tent was to stand next to Big Ben. Probably long gone, so now I just scream senior abuse.

Slug: I think we have 300 feet on the main anchor. Will take extra line for the drogues later. We do quite well beating into the wind with not much sail. And we fire up Clunky when needed. One of the nice things about Vancouver Island, is the nicely spaced bays and safe anchorages. Longest day run was 55 miles to go around the top. Bull Harbour to Winter Harbour. With only paper charts entering Winter, requires a careful reading and planning. Rocks are everywhere around Van Isle. The plotter makes it much easier.

The 018 cruise will likely be to the Broughtons, and on to Haida Gwai. Leave late June / early July.

Unkle Krusty

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On 1/3/2018 at 11:23 PM, slug zitski said:

Well crusty... min. safety gear is specified by your geographic area of operation.  You must be one hundred percent compliant. 

as for practical , add some extra stuff to be even safer ...the number one is communications.   

Again.. I  dont know your area of operation , but the mobile phone is a very potent safey device for coastal sailing 

when the shit hits the fan...a medical emergency for instance...that phone will save your life 

to extend mobile phone range, internet connection , you can use an amplifier  external  antenna.

with my amplifier I get a connection  when well offshore and inshore when plauged by coverage shadows. 

 

you should ask your electronic guy about  amplifier options for your area. 

The setup is not cheap..

http://www.globalmarinenet.com/product/gmn-recommended-marine-cell-booster/

i know nothing of this brand...its only a google hit .  My unit is Siemens 

Amplifiers are cool. I bought one for my parents you live 30 miles out side of a small town in the Midwest that is 60 miles out of a big city.
When I was visiting no one could get cell service inside the house and most of the large porch. service was only in a certain area of the porch
I bought this model that is mounted on a pole outside. https://www.wilsonamplifiers.com/weboost-connect-4g-cell-phone-signal-booster-kit-470103/

The have lots of stuff but not sure about marine.

https://www.wilsonamplifiers.com/

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inshore... at night you are in your rubber tender and you fire off the strobe to keep from getting run down by high speed traffic

I don't think this is a great idea. An all round white light is way better.

Strobe lights attract attention, but it is very hard for other people to judge the distance from a strobe light.

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On 1/9/2018 at 5:46 PM, slug zitski said:

Enough of forum trash...ths is crusties safety thread.

every year folks die in dingies..thier motor breaks down, runs out of gas, offshore wind....two weeks later they find the dingy and its dead crew.... eaten by seagulls . Onshore wind and the crew get smashed in the breakers..

very important that you carry an anchor and a very long anchor rode.   At least 100 meters of thin stuff plus an anchor that really works. 

So every time you get in a Dinghy you take 100 meters of rope with you? And a strobe?. Here is an idea. Service your engine regularly, check you have enough fuel each time, make sure you have oars that work and take a anchor and sufficient rode for the depths you may need to anchor in. A hand held vhf, quality torch, flare pack and life jackets also make sense if the trip might require it.

Slug you should probably leave the advice to those that have some actual cruising experience. You sound like a newbie that believes everything he is told by the marina experts to me.

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29 minutes ago, Zonker said:

I don't think this is a great idea. An all round white light is way better.

Strobe lights attract attention, but it is very hard for other people to judge the distance from a strobe light.

My wife and I got run down in our dinghy in Greece by a pissed wog in his small dick boat in the middle of the day. A few scratches and a deflated chamber was luckily all we got and the cunt didn't even stop. I saw him at anchor a few days later and when I went to talk to him about it he gave me a mouthful and told me it was his country. Somehow a potato got stuck in his Genset intake later that night. Kama can be a bitch.

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I have often said: Most of the exciting things with boating involve a dinky, alcohol and darkness. 

Back to the main theme. Was in the marine store today, inquiring about a life raft, EPIRB, AIS and hand held VHF. Will likely buy all except the personal AIS at the moment. Thinking of newer solar panels as well. Currently rebuilding the dodger, then the frame for the solar panels, plus the usual other stuff.

Unkle Krusty

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Update:  We now own a new life raft in a Valise. Will store it down below. An EPIRB. And a hand held VHF radio. Two new personal strobe lights too. I spent a day at the Vancouver BC boat show. Later, I will be doing more research on the items suggested here. A cell phone booster will be handy if we go to Haida Gwaii this year.

Meantime I will be building a new dodger, and a new frame for the solar panels. Might buy a couple of new panels. Plus the usual maintenance stuff. My boat, Griffon, lives at Silva Bay, on the bottom of Gabriola Island. Was in Victoria for a few years.

Might make it down for the Swiftsure inshore race this year. Chore production will decide.

Unkle Krusty

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