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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Editor

why am i here?

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why-am-i-here-again-1.jpg

Usually the photos that get featured from big regattas show boats totally kicking ass, with sailors uber focused on the task at hand. But there is always the other side of the coin, the blown races, the regattas lost, the agony of defeat.  Now we don't pretend to know what is going through this young sailors mind in this photo taken at the ongoing 29er Worlds in Hong Kong, but we get the "what in the hell am I doing here?" vibe.

Ever been in a race - any race - and find yourself asking the same question, "what in the hell am I doing here?"

Drop in here and share those moments when you wish you were anywhere but there!

 

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I did this race one time on a Melges 32 in San Diego so there I was...

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6 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

boats name ?

Il Moro di Venezia.  Raul Gardini's lovely Sangermani cold-moulded Frers 70.  

moro.jpg

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Many years ago at a dingy regatta my centerboard got caught in the anchor line of the committee boat at the finish. Worked to free myself while about 12 boats finished. Of course the race committee had all of this on video. 

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As a kid, state sunfish (are you still allowed to say the word sunfish given the kerfuffle going on with the manufacturer?) championship - final regatta.  There was only one kid that could mathematically beat me and we got an early 0 degree snowstorm during the second race.  Tipped over once, freezing cold water down to the jiggly bits, and I definitely was asking the question.

Literally sailed a circle around the kid, forced him into 3 consecutive fouls while screaming that I was not going to let him beat me and we retired from the race to a hot shower and cocoa by the fireplace.

Youth - it is wasted on the young.

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Found myself hanging from a port tack crossers bow pulpit as my boat sailed away. Still no real recollection of what happened from the Oh S..t moment when I realized they were not going to successfully duck us, to when I was just hanging there.

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Know the feeling well. My first centerboard boat was a 470 in 1972, I was capsized so often the fleet captain suggested I paint my sail number on the centerboard. I told him I didn't need to, if he saw a centerboard just assume it was me.

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Back in 1980, I had all but signed up to do the Whitbread. A couple of friends on board were pushing me to join them and it seemed the right thing for a 25 year old to go do.  Then there I was at the front of the railbirds  on a 65 footer in the St. Pete to Ft. Lauderdale race. We were just south of Miami, going upwind in 25+  and launching off the Gulfstream Condo waves. The water was warm but the air was cold and I was soaked through and it sucked. As I huddled there in misery, knowing the finish was just hours away, I wondered what it would be like when the finish was weeks away.  As much as I love to sail, I hate being miserable. I decided right there to take a different offer and move to California where long, cold, wet beats are not on the menu. 

Sure, I sometimes regret not having sailed around the world, but I did different sailing that was just as fulfilling.  I've rarely had to be miserable for more than a few hours and I just can't see the point in being so just to prove how tough you are.  That said, if I were 25 today, I'd be looking for a VOR ride......

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I remember death rolling downwind with multiple capsizes in a topper as a kid. The relief when the mast gate worked loose and the rig came down so I could finally get rescued...

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MAISA racing at USMA, West Point, in April, with a crash boat that was un-reliable and ice going down the Hudson, 29 F Air temp.

Double Handed "Rites of Spring" SFBay 2008 > 20 kts, wife slipped/fell into cockpit well,  wedged by pfd, lying on back with legs in the air, and could not get out unassisted due to waves/heel. 

 

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Back in dinosaur days, racing Beverly dinghys at Brown, mast fell down (metal deck collar was only mast support, and unknown to this visitor, they liked to just work loose when they felt like it).

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Any time in the Tasman Sea........

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3 hours ago, P_Wop said:

 

 

Il Moro di Venezia.  Raul Gardini's lovely Sangermani cold-moulded Frers 70.  

moro.jpg

holy shit what a machine. beautiful boat. 

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I get that feeling everytime we pitch pole the catamaran. Also had it when I turtled for the first time even with my mast sealed!

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Just minutes away from finishing an agonizingly long swiftsure race where the female Owner/Driver got into a real bitchfest with a Canadian boat that was not even in our fleet, all because she wanted to get a little bit over to the left side and they wanted to get a little bit over to the right side and we were both going the same speed and could not make the move happen.

Being that this was going down at night in the dark didn't help prevent ugly Americanism at its finest.

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On the advice of Counsel, I will be invoking my 5th Amendment rights.

:ph34r:

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17 minutes ago, carcrash said:

Three days out on any Transpac

Rolling around for a few hours in an Ericson 39 mid Pacific, all sails down, as we fixed the steering quadrant that pulled through the cockpit floor

Half way from Bermuda to Azores, when the second depression passes, so we have 6-12 foot wave trains from all directions

3 hour long broach in the ITCZ

Overnight race where the owner comes up into the cockpit at 3am and starts beating his 18 year old son with his fists because we stretched the watch to give him and his watch an extra hour of sleep

Any protest room

LAYC when it was in Fish Harbor

holy shit that place stank. i remember just parking our boat aldora there for a couple days before the start of the la-cabo race and prepping and loading the boat was so foul. i think the starfish tuna factory was there or something similar. they did use it in the usual suspects, that had to suck for the film crew .

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21 minutes ago, carcrash said:

Three days out on any Transpac

Rolling around for a few hours in an Ericson 39 mid Pacific, all sails down, as we fixed the steering quadrant that pulled through the cockpit floor

Half way from Bermuda to Azores, when the second depression passes, so we have 6-12 foot wave trains from all directions

3 hour long broach in the ITCZ

Overnight race where the owner comes up into the cockpit at 3am and starts beating his 18 year old son with his fists because we stretched the watch to give him and his watch an extra hour of sleep

Any protest room

LAYC when it was in Fish Harbor

Damn,  you got stories. 

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2016 Pacific Cup, double handed.  First night out "Otto" quit.  Hand steered for 14 days, me age 70, partner 60.  A lot of rain and overcast.  Real fun putting on soaked foul weather gear every two hours around the clock.  Main halyard gave way 5 days out of Oahu.  Sailed the last days on head sail alone.  But hey, I pulled guard duty in the Army at 20 below, and survived their food for two years.

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59 minutes ago, foamy1946 said:

2016 Pacific Cup, double handed.  First night out "Otto" quit.  Hand steered for 14 days, me age 70, partner 60.  A lot of rain and overcast.  Real fun putting on soaked foul weather gear every two hours around the clock.  Main halyard gave way 5 days out of Oahu.  Sailed the last days on head sail alone.  But hey, I pulled guard duty in the Army at 20 below, and survived their food for two years.

....always nice to have younger crew members.

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10 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Il Moro di Venezia.  Raul Gardini's lovely Sangermani cold-moulded Frers 70.  

moro.jpg

wow is that beautiful!

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Mine was sailing a full rig Laser when I was 18 weighing about 60kgs, before the days of Radials, on the Swan River in Perth most Saturdays.

Most of the time the Freo Doctor was in and blowing steady 15-20 knots. I remember one particular day when it must've been closer to 25 knots. Capsize after capsize after capsize I was getting a bit frustrated, and a bit worn out, so after about the 5th capsize I struggled to get back up on the centreboard and when I did I just jumped on it...centreboard was fine...boom however was a different story because I'd forgotten to ease off the vang...so I limped back to the club, which was thankfully on a broadish reach, all the while cursing and saying "Why the fuck am I doing this?"

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Last Coffs Race, 210 mile into a headwind all the way blowing from 0- 25 knots and short tacking up the coast.  About 100+ tacks in 2 days, we only eased the sheets to cross the line.  It was a Sisyphean ordeal as every time you reached a headland the next one appeared further east so you had to work to it

 

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1996 Cowes-Rotterdam when Duncan Monro Kerr was lost off 'Trocar'.

Blowing like stink with zero viz night or day.

Learned 2 things that race : 1) how to rig a try-sail, 2) If a cargo vessel does not answer your hails, shoot a flare at his bridge, any colour will do.

@ Albanyguy : same thing but 6 years ago. Young'uns out pointing and out hiking me on the beat. Turned around mid-race and sold the bloody thing on ebay a week later ;)

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Basically, every Governor's Cup that I've done.

89 miles on the rhumb line translates to well over 100 miles with 30 kts on the nose and a 4 foot chop with a 2-3 second period. This grinds boat speed down to a crawl. Sometimes it rains just to add insult. Boats just beat themselves and shit starts breaking.  I've even had the added sand kicked in my face of having the wind clock around to the north just as we turn up the St. Mary's river to ensure that every last fucking inch of the race is upwind.

It ain't the '79 Fastnet but it does make people ask "WTF am I doing here?"

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Probably this was my moment when I thought, what am I doing here...

Dutch Nationals in 2002 at Medemblik. One of the first regattas I've sailed in the 49er. Very little experience in the 49er at that time, and 25+ knots of breeze... Flying all over the place... That's me flying through the air.

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I have had that wonderful thought a number of times in my sailing life.

I have had a number of times out chasing cold fronts on my short sailboards in my youth where I had hypothermia creep up on me, which started to make waterstarts difficult.   A few times I started to worry that I was not going to make it back.

Crewing on Picante, a Soverel 33 that had been given IOR 'improvements' in the 1986 SORC.   The improvements included messing up the underwater lines with hollows and bumps, plus the inboard motor was mounted in where the forward v-berth was located.   We were the smallest and slowest boat in the fleet, but we were definitely not 'Death from Behind.'  Two of the races in the series we DNF'ed because of time limits.   This was not a near death experience, more like an endless visit to Purgatory.   From that experience, I made the rule for myself to be on the biggest boat I can possibly get on for racing.

Delivering the J-35 Man-o-war, from Mo-Bay to Antigua.  The first night out was 45 knots on the nose, #4, 3 reefs in the main and square waves.   The BN of the boat, Puchi, had no touch on the helm and was dropping the boat off the tops of the waves.   I came up and took over.   In the first 10 minutes on the helm,  I was deep into 'Why am I here?'   I was worried that we would split the hull in bow or have a rigging failure from the drops we were doing.   It was pitch black, all sailing was by braille.   At 15 minutes, I figured out that if I gave a good yank on the tiller when I felt the deceleration in the climb to the top of the wave, I could keep the hull attached to the back of the wave and not slam into the bottom of the trough.   Then it just became a matter of endurance until the wind died down a bit, as I did not want Puchi back on the helm.

Aint it fun!

Stumbling

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79 fastest "la pantera" and upside down 1250 miles southwest of Perth on sayula. Reportedly lost at sea two times. My mother told me to just stop   honor, sorry bout your experiences with the wicked med witch of the new  i had the misfortune to be the sail maker 

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13 hours ago, Editor said:

wow is that beautiful!

Yup, one of the really pretty ones.  I was wrong about 70', more like 67'.  But she had a gigantic Mediterranean masthead rig, probably 95' and rated about 64 feet.  Tim Stearn's first big-boat 3-spreader one replaced the original Hood 2-spreader pole, and it bent like crazy - runner loads were impressive.  Great boat for the Med, but we had a nightmare Fastnet.  Not as bad as many others, though. 

Round the Rock with a medium #1, then .75 runner, 1.5 reacher, 2.2 reacher, #2 jib top and staysail, a reef, staysail down, #3, #4, another reef, #5, main boom ploughing through the drink, tried to get in another reef but the reef line flogged out of the sail, so main down, storm staysail up, and thinking of trisail when we saw the B&G anemometer pegged at 60 knots so we carried on with just the storm staysail - 17 knots at times.  A couple of major knockdowns and lost the masthead gear under water.  Compasses too.  Lots of water inside meant we lost all electrics and electronics too.

Lucky I had taken my sextant and tables, so could take over from navigator who had curled into a bunk, and work out roughly where we were next morning.  Seas were huge, and the real problem was that you just couldn't see the smaller boats coming the other way till very late.

Anyone who says the big boats had an easy time wasn't there in one.

My 3rd Fastnet, and went on to do 8 more.  Go figure.

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18 hours ago, longy said:

Please tell me you were NOT sailing with Marta?

I'm pretty sure anyone from the PNW has figured it out from his story.

Who else could it be?

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5 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Yup, one of the really pretty ones.  I was wrong about 70', more like 67'.  But she had a gigantic Mediterranean masthead rig, probably 95' and rated about 64 feet.  Tim Stearn's first big-boat 3-spreader one replaced the original Hood 2-spreader pole, and it bent like crazy - runner loads were impressive.  Great boat for the Med, but we had a nightmare Fastnet.  Not as bad as many others, though. 

Round the Rock with a medium #1, then .75 runner, 1.5 reacher, 2.2 reacher, #2 jib top and staysail, a reef, staysail down, #3, #4, another reef, #5, main boom ploughing through the drink, tried to get in another reef but the reef line flogged out of the sail, so main down, storm staysail up, and thinking of trisail when we saw the B&G anemometer pegged at 60 knots so we carried on with just the storm staysail - 17 knots at times.  A couple of major knockdowns and lost the masthead gear under water.  Compasses too.  Lots of water inside meant we lost all electrics and electronics too.

Lucky I had taken my sextant and tables, so could take over from navigator who had curled into a bunk, and work out roughly where we were next morning.  Seas were huge, and the real problem was that you just couldn't see the smaller boats coming the other way till very late.

Anyone who says the big boats had an easy time wasn't there in one.

My 3rd Fastnet, and went on to do 8 more.  Go figure.

What time did u round fastnet? We were about midnight 

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Just now, poncho said:

What time did u round fastnet? We were about midnight 

We came round in daylight.  Not sure, 7-ish?  At that time I think were leading overall.  Such a witch in light air with that huge rig.

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Long Island sound late seventies killer boat end start in a Fireball race as a junior and the wadding from the start gun blows a hole right through the big red ball class logo on my mainsail. 

 

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10 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

We came round in daylight.  Not sure, 7-ish?  At that time I think were leading overall.  Such a witch in light air with that huge rig.

Benny and decided to take a wave about half way back to lands end. I picked a small one. Only about 40 foot or so  scared the crap out of the off watch!  Coming back to the UK for a.few months this spring. The old haunts. Lymington. 

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7 hours ago, Ajax said:

Basically, every Governor's Cup that I've done.

89 miles on the rhumb line translates to well over 100 miles with 30 kts on the nose and a 4 foot chop with a 2-3 second period. This grinds boat speed down to a crawl. Sometimes it rains just to add insult. Boats just beat themselves and shit starts breaking.  I've even had the added sand kicked in my face of having the wind clock around to the north just as we turn up the St. Mary's river to ensure that every last fucking inch of the race is upwind.

It ain't the '79 Fastnet but it does make people ask "WTF am I doing here?"

 

Why would you want to sail on the Chesapeake?  They only have light airs there.  ;)  

 

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2017 Ida Lewis Distance Race. We sail through two major fronts of T-storms with local gusts into the 40 kt range. Escape with no damage, but crew is combination of hypothermic and sea sick. Around midnight, we're broad reaching at 17 kts towards Cuttyhunk with our A5 and a full main when we snag a lobster pot. Steering jams. We round up and flog the kite to death before we can letterbox it. Have to cut the halyard and we lose the sheets overboard with the remnants of the kite. Even dragging the pot behind us, we're still doing 9 kts through the water, but we can't steer. Then the boat catches fire. Why am I here?

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Missing half our regular crew, moderate air with some big puffs, wrong kite on board, botched rounding at the bottom of the course led to this.....

IMG_0117.thumb.JPG.c837d25d21a58cdb91b8d7c0fb975995.JPG

I was happy enough - I wasn't the guy swimming inside the lifelines. Pretty sure he was wondering why he was there. 

Earlier last summer though - Racing across Lake Erie on a J/92 in mid May. Wind 30+ on the nose, 40F outside. Soaked, chilled, we were competitive until a  crew member (my friend's wife's friend who is not a sailor) got too chilled to stay on the rail and went below to get extra layers. We depowered the main to make it a little less bumpy while she was downstairs and it delaminated from the flapping, so we got extra slow with big waves on the nose and not enough power to get through them well. I was reasonably content until the skipper, a good friend since we were 8 years old, handed me the stick and said "here, you drive for a bit," then proceeded to violently puke on my lap and boots.

 

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2005 Van Isle 360 Offshore Leg:  Upwind into a breeze that had been blowing 25-30 for the previous 2 days, 4'-6' square, backless waves, about 30 miles off shore.  Middle of the night - 1 am -  a crewman goes below.  Doesn't come back up for a while.  I shift my helm position so I can see below and see him standing, staring at the head.  I go below and he says "I don't know what to do".  I look in the head and he's managed to break the outflow pump off its base and off the hose on the downstroke and has blown shit up the walls of the head 3' high.   Secure the through hull.  Send him back on deck where he blows chunks in the cockpit.  

Spend the next hour plus head down in the head, wearing rubber gloves, and on my hands and knees scraping/scrubbing the crap off the walls and the sole.  Carryied buckets of sea water down to sluice the walls, filled them up with black water, and then back up to chuck it off the transom.  

Sluiced out the cockpit.  Threw the sponges and gloves overboard.  (Sorry about that.)

Went back to driving into the dawn.

Never got seasick, but truly wondered why I was there.

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Finding out our rudder quadrant was slipping in the middle of the Transatlantic Race in 2015.

 

Main down, attach halyard to rudder head, winch back up, tighten screws, tape rudder head so we have a reference point to check more easily from on deck. Carry on for another week. 

Definitely had that question in the back of my head once we started to put the main back up.

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In the mid 90’s I was sailing a Laser. The qualification race for the IYRU Youth Worlds on Bermuda was one single regatta, and it was blowing 40kts in the gusts. I got the boom in my head in a gybe, lights went out for a split second. After checking my head for blood I continued racing despite having a light concussion and vomiting. I was thinking it was insane but the ticket to the worlds required a good result and beating the other youth sailors...

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Re Il Moro and the 1979 Fastnet, here we are drying out in Plymouth afterwards.  Plenty of water in the boat - massive washing machine effect.

Williwaw next to us.  Mr Conner was not happy to read his obituary in the NY Times.

 

ajaxnetphoto-15th-august-1979-plymouth-e

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14 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Re Il Moro and the 1979 Fastnet, here we are drying out in Plymouth afterwards.  Plenty of water in the boat - massive washing machine effect.

Williwaw next to us.  Mr Conner was not happy to read his obituary in the NY Times.

 

ajaxnetphoto-15th-august-1979-plymouth-e

companionway hatches.....this one was lucky.... 

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First sail of the spring after a heavy snow winter, double-handing my keelboat with my new-to-sailing sweetie.   A little puff comes up, we both slide butts out and lean back into the lifeline, which immediately snaps.   100% of crew MOB, head over heels into water that was snow melt a day ago.   The 22 gracefully sails on, main and jib both cleated.   Later realize heavy snow load on the winter tarp had bent and fatigued the lifeline at the stanchion.  

Yeah, a moment of "why am I here", before survival instincts kick in and I thrash like mad to swim to the best-guess of the inevitable round-up & self-tack point.  She's more, why am I "here".  Obviously, we survived (thankfully a trailing lifeline to last-ditch grasp and an open transom to haul up over).  Not so obvious why she's still "here".  

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surprised no one mentioned the smoke stacks on long island (always forget what town they're in). they always give you so much hope, can see the stacks we must be close.... and then the wind shuts off and the tide switches. every. damn. time. or its the ABI race and you can't see shit through the fog anyway. 

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Evil Cowes to Dieppe race. Got across the Channel overnight ok but then the breeze dropped and we spent the whole of the next day creeping up the French coast, starting to run low on food and water (the Nav had started hoarding!). Still, doing very well against the big boats on time until the breeze totally shut down. We could see the finish line and all the big boats squeezing over with not a damn thing we could do about it. Most frustrating race EVER. 

Of course on the delivery home the breeze got up and it was quite lumpy. Figures...

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First big-breeze 505 regatta- North Americans in Santa Cruz CA. First time in the boat in 25kt+ gusts. In a beater boat. 

That's either Howard Hamlin or Mike Martin, in first, lapping us. 

 

Subsequently learned my tiller was ~a foot longer than what the west coast guys sail with, which meant I couldn't cross the boat properly in a breeze-on gybe. Hacksaw treatment of said tiller magically solved the gybing problem. 

 

 

5a5111ff130a0_5o5NACD314-47-36P1140073.thumb.jpg.36628b95ac25da386dca73690d101b01.jpg

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We took a Soling out midafternoon Boston Harbor - last minute decision.  Boats were on moorings with sails on board.  Easy.

More breeze towards South Shore so off we go.  Fair ways down a thick fog rolls in and we do 180 to get back.  Awkward moment, with darkness on us,  as we notice the compass is busted out. 

Miss the main channel and head off to Dorchester Bay in Old Harbor.  Boat nudges into sandbar, no wind, no anchor to work it off.  We settle in, laugh & wait for help.  Stinkpotter comes by and grab a ride to South Boston YC and taxi it  back to club.

Next day head over & discover we ran aground on the public beach in front of the projects.   No water to float it off for another 24 hrs.   Take everything off boat as crowd gathers for a good laugh. Club insists I wait there so nothing gets trashed.  Great.

”Everyone runs aground” stories tossed my way for next couple weeks.

 

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17 hours ago, mustang__1 said:

surprised no one mentioned the smoke stacks on long island (always forget what town they're in). they always give you so much hope, can see the stacks we must be close.... and then the wind shuts off and the tide switches. every. damn. time. or its the ABI race and you can't see shit through the fog anyway. 

Northport.  Spent many races wondering if we gaining or not on those fucking stacks

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Not sure it applies. Windsurfing in the nineties. Run over another board standing still on water. Didn't see it because of chop and sun. Strucked in my inner thigh. Lots of blood and flesh. Panicked. No time to think then. Managed to get to get up and reached  shore (not so far away). Missed my groins by 3 inches and the femoral by 1- Very close. Kept on windsurfing . Still chills me.

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On LI Sound before I owned a drysuit, whenever I capsized,  throughout January, February or March it always sort of sucked.

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16 hours ago, Matt DI said:

Northport.  Spent many races wondering if we gaining or not on those fucking stacks

For Chesapeake sailors, it's the lights of the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant. Those lights mock you for hours unless you're PHRF A0 or a multihull on a fast reach.

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20 hours ago, Matt DI said:

Northport.  Spent many races wondering if we gaining or not on those fucking stacks

yep, thems the ones. 

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This past summer, we were on the way back to Annapolis from Oxford in a dead calm as the expected southerly breeze failed to materialize.  We motored WOT for about an hour and overheated. I had to reduce throttle for the long slog back. The admiral was in low spirits for hours until I pointed to the hazy shape of Thomas Point light in the distance.  It still took a while but we managed to get to the dock before the evening squall hit.

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Van Isle 360 2017. Leg 7 from Winter Harbor to Ucluelet, upwind in a 20-35 knot southeasterly with the predominant NW ground swell underneath. Lots of waves that didn't have anything behind them and the boat was getting air-born regularly. At a certain point we dialed back because we didn't want to break the boat (J125 didn't like the sea-state). Went down below about 4 hours into the race and found 150- 200  gallons of water sloshing everywhere. Spent the next 4 hours bailing and trying to figure out how we were sinking. 

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Racing 470s from Chicago's Burnham Harbor in the early 70s.  It had been blowing above 25 from the north for three days, so the swell was pretty spectacular by the time it reached the bottom of Lake Michigan.  Getting out of Burnham was ... interesting ... for the swell would rebound from McCormick Place, and the reflected waves would be about 20' crest to trough.  Once we managed to get out onto the lake, I'd be out on the wire and either looking down into the troughs or completely underwater.  Got hit by a bit of cross-chop and lost my footing, swung aft knocking the driver over and ending up on the low side.  Driver managed to head off so I could regain footing and climb back to the high side, and get back out on the wire and we were managing to cope reasonably well ... until the driver lost his breakfast.  That was enough for us and we headed back ... to discover that the races had been abandoned for the day.

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Late 90's Southern Straits.  The owner showed up on race morning still plastered from the last evening's party.  On the way to the start area, he starts berating the crew and generally being an ass.  At the start line, I actually gave serious thought to jumping overboard and swimming to the RC.  The rest of the crew were good guys and the hangover kicked in such that the owner was a non-entity through the race, but wow.  We lost in spectacular fashion, but I dodged a bullet there - before that race, I had sailed with the guy for more than a year and had considered partnering with him on the Dash 34.

Mid 90's Driftsure.  Spent most of an afternoon sitting at the end of a hook outside Jordan River in an absolute downpour while trying to get back to Victoria.  The boat was showing more than a knot of boatspeed through the water (outbound tide) and there wasn't a breath of wind.  This was racing?!?

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On 1/5/2018 at 3:42 AM, albanyguy said:

Mine was sailing a full rig Laser when I was 18 weighing about 60kgs, before the days of Radials, on the Swan River in Perth most Saturdays.

Most of the time the Freo Doctor was in and blowing steady 15-20 knots. I remember one particular day when it must've been closer to 25 knots. Capsize after capsize after capsize I was getting a bit frustrated, and a bit worn out, so after about the 5th capsize I struggled to get back up on the centreboard and when I did I just jumped on it...centreboard was fine...boom however was a different story because I'd forgotten to ease off the vang...so I limped back to the club, which was thankfully on a broadish reach, all the while cursing and saying "Why the fuck am I doing this?"

Growing up on the Chesapeake, we raced lasers--when we were only 60 lbs--not 60 kags.  Full rig. OK maybe more like 90 lbs. That's what Holly weight dripping wet. She was good though--could handle the power.
On the rare days we got like yours, we were hooting and yee-hawing as loud as you could. AbsoluiTy blast. Never forget the way the bow would go up, thje board would hu,m and showtime!

 

I guess ymmv in this game ;-)

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Mothers day friend and family day sail off St Augustine Fl on my friends Rhodes 30.. After a fairly pleasant day of sailing around it looked like the afternoon rain was going to begin so we started to head back twrd the inlet. About a couple miles off the sea buoy we saw this mushroom cloud atom bomb  totally fucked super cell something that looked like a tornado or very ugly downdraft coming very quickly our way from land . feeling that if we were to get caught in it in the middle of the inlet would end up in grounding to the side we prepared the boat as we would for a hurricane by wrapping rope around the main on the boom taking down the bimini and closing the thru hulls ect,. I told my friend that everybody should stay inside to keep weight down low , closed the hatch and bam it hit.. it was without question the most fucked up white squall ,hail ,screaming rigging  windmore than I had heard even in a cat1. I put the engine full and kept the wind aft to control the boat.., I was really pissed because my 2yr old was onboard because I kept thinking that if we rolled over and sank we'd be swimming with the sharks ( although he thought the ride was quite fun)  the hail and wind was crazy and I'm sure inside it sounded like hell, my friend pops his head up and asks where we are going and I tell him IDK because the compass is spinning ( my first thought was ..so this is like those devils triangle stories) ( Later I figured out why) he says try to go against it and get out I say no way its too strong the only way I can control the boat is to go with it.. he say try...so I go down a wave trough turn around and the moment the bow comes up the wave the wind pushes us around knocks us bare poled straight over..I look over at the water  and see that the full keel just churning thru the water like some toy boat thats been kicked over by some giant.. I'm like no way and turn to continue running..every chance down in the trough I would nudge over a bit to try to turn us out slowly..eventually after about IDK the hail stopped n I thought yes we are out...but then again the same thing more hail more white out and crazy wind.. there was this chic below who was her first time on a boat and my wife said she was white with fear and crying.. listening to the thunder eventually it went from both sides to one side to the hail ending to everything blowing over us and gone and then we just made our way back in and to the dock... At the dock..my friend jokingly says to his friends thanx for coming..the chic said she would never step on a boat ever again then the dock guy comes up and says to us.." Hey, You guys see those two water spouts?" I'm like ya we did... Thats when I thought about the spinning compass.. I must have been going in circles to keep the wind astern.. ...or 

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