• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sign in to follow this  
Tempest

Proper technique for single handed jibes?

Recommended Posts

I have no problem tacking single handed since the main sheet doesn't need to be touched or, if on a boat with a traveler, it can be moved after tending to the head sail but what about jibes?  Is there a proper technique for performing a single handed jibe?  I can do it in light air but when things start picking up I get a little concerned. 

What is the proper order of operations for single handed jibing with a simple sloop rig?  At this point I have a tiller and no auto helm so I need to be holding onto her at all times.

I can't help thinking that one would sheet in the boom, perform the jibe and ease the main sheet before tending to the head sail but that is just a guess.

Is it common to just round up, tack and then fall off?  I imagine this would probably be safer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tack... easy to haul in the mainsheet as you pass thru the wind. Zero shock loading on the system 

a flying jibe fatigues everything in the system...vang , gooseneck, traveler car, batten pockets ....and the sagging mainsheet may remove your head or pull a winch off the deck 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to tack unless breeze / seaway is excessive. Turn down wind, sheet in main and gybe ease main. You should now be wing on wing. Gybe Jib. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Tempest said:

I have no problem tacking single handed since the main sheet doesn't need to be touched or, if on a boat with a traveler, it can be moved after tending to the head sail but what about jibes?  Is there a proper technique for performing a single handed jibe?  I can do it in light air but when things start picking up I get a little concerned. 

What is the proper order of operations for single handed jibing with a simple sloop rig?  At this point I have a tiller and no auto helm so I need to be holding onto her at all times.

I can't help thinking that one would sheet in the boom, perform the jibe and ease the main sheet before tending to the head sail but that is just a guess.

Is it common to just round up, tack and then fall off?  I imagine this would probably be safer.

Your statement in bold is correct. This reduces the fatigue items that Slug is referring to.  In lighter winds, this really isn't a problem. In heavier air and lumpy water, I highly recommend combining this technique with a "boom brake." 

https://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?name=wichard-gyb-easy-boom-brake&path=-1|118|2358532|2358536&id=911760

https://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?name=sailology-tackrite-simple-boom-brake&path=-1|118|2358532|2358536&id=4077114

Boom brakes use an additional piece of line and friction to slow the gybe down.  You can vary the amount of friction by reeving the line in different ways. Very handy in case the mainsheet gets away from you.  When conditions really exceed your comfort point, just take the long way around and tack.

My opinion is that Slug's severe aversion to any gybing at all, comes from the fact that he singlehands a very large boat with large forces.  For the rest of us, a well controlled gybe is not taboo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Singlehanded with spinnaker or without? How large a boat and how much wind?

I usually gybe the main first and then hold about 10 degrees "up" from DDW and go forward to gybe the spinnaker pole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:
6 hours ago, Tempest said:

I have no problem tacking single handed since the main sheet doesn't need to be touched or, if on a boat with a traveler, it can be moved after tending to the head sail but what about jibes?  Is there a proper technique for performing a single handed jibe?  I can do it in light air but when things start picking up I get a little concerned. 

What is the proper order of operations for single handed jibing with a simple sloop rig?  At this point I have a tiller and no auto helm so I need to be holding onto her at all times.

I can't help thinking that one would sheet in the boom, perform the jibe and ease the main sheet before tending to the head sail but that is just a guess.

Is it common to just round up, tack and then fall off?  I imagine this would probably be safer.

Your statement in bold is correct. This reduces the fatigue items that Slug is referring to.  In lighter winds, this really isn't a problem. In heavier air and lumpy water, I highly recommend combining this technique with a "boom brake." 

https://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?name=wichard-gyb-easy-boom-brake&path=-1|118|2358532|2358536&id=911760

https://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?name=sailology-tackrite-simple-boom-brake&path=-1|118|2358532|2358536&id=4077114

Boom brakes use an additional piece of line and friction to slow the gybe down.  You can vary the amount of friction by reeving the line in different ways. Very handy in case the mainsheet gets away from you.  When conditions really exceed your comfort point, just take the long way around and tack.

My opinion is that Slug's severe aversion to any gybing at all, comes from the fact that he singlehands a very large boat with large forces.  For the rest of us, a well controlled gybe is not taboo.

 

If you have a mainsheet rigged to be handled with large winches instead of a big tackle, you can have a boom brake on the mainsheet itself. I used to think this was stupid (and the winches are expensive if you have to buy them scratch) but it can work quite well.

I dislike hauling in the mainsheet to gybe, it slows the boat (making steering more difficult) and puts irregular forces on the rig & helm (making steering more difficult). If you leave the main out, bring the boat slightly by-the-lee, then use one part of the mainsheet tackle to haul, shift, then slow, the main coming over, then the boat can keep a steady course & speed. It also pulls the mainsheet up so the bight is less likely to snag on things as it sweeps across the deck. The problem is that hand-hauling the main up to and past centerline takes a good bit of grunt and you need good footing too. Sometimes it won't come and you have to turn more by-the-lee, and at some point it gets easier to tack.

There is also a maneuver I've used many times, once with a dramatic failure..... the North River gybe. This is where you leave the mainsheet out, and turn by-the-lee until the main is about to come over. Then spin the boat hard thru the gybe up to close-hauled (or thereabouts) on the new tack...... the main will swing over hard so you need to make sure the sheet isn't going to tangle.... and then luff/flog harmlessly with the wind itself as the brake. You then bear away, happy as a clam. The failure I had was with a full-keeled boat which would NOT turn fast enough, and the boom hit the lower shroud hard enough to dimple the spar section -and- distort the turnbuckle. Not a breakage but certainly could lead to it. Note to self- double check the length of the mainsheet to the stopper knot, too.

It's an argument against boats dependent on runners/checks for short handed cruising.

By the time gybing is actively dangerous, I'd strongly suggest tacking instead. As pointed out, gybing is hard on the rig and stuff can go very wrong.

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dont know it its the proper way, but this is what we do on the Moore, granted it’s just a big dinghy.   Easy pole forward and take up on tack line, until the kite is flying on the tack line alone, spin sheet has to come in and the boat has to heat up slightly.   Drop pole down to the deck.  Take the slack out of the vang so the main will come across easier.  Get the old spin sheet ready to run, get the new sheet on a winch.   Ease the sheet and rotate the kite, slowly turn the boat.   Blow the spin sheet, flip the main, big trim on the new sheet to fill the kite.   Once full big ease and get the boat settled down.    Lock the tiller with the tiller extension run forward swap the pole to the new guy at the headstay and move the pole to the windward side of the headstay.   Run back and grab the tiller.   Load new guy into self-tailing winch, ease tack line and bring guy back easing the sheet along the way.   Release vang and start sending it again.    Single handed this takes about 2 minutes, doublehanded it takes about 45 seconds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

different boat sizes, different techniques,   but you have the order down,  gybe main, then fuck with the jib..

I race a 20' keel boat singlehand quite a bit..  being that small, I  will sit on windward size, get close to by the lee , grab all the mainsheet and pull her across making sure not to hook the tiller, cleats , heads, feet etc..  (I'll usually catch the boom with one hand to soften the stresses )

once across , change sides and make sure everything is tidy..   if you have a somewhat balanced boat , going forward to gybe the jib isn't too much of an issue.. if not , then the boat zigs and zags everywhere in which case  some people in the fleet have a cut a piece of pvc that fits over the end of the tiller and is long enough to hold between their legs while they screw with the jib..   in check writing weather, 15+, sometimes I'll forego the pole and sail hotter angles

but the best thing to do, is go practice... take a reasonable day and do a 100 gybes, afterwards you'll think nothing of it..

 

ps. in medium+ conditions,  make sure you have some vang on to control the gybe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, sailronin said:

Singlehanded with spinnaker or without? How large a boat and how much wind?

I usually gybe the main first and then hold about 10 degrees "up" from DDW and go forward to gybe the spinnaker pole.

Funny, I do the opposite.  I go to the mast, switch the pole, then push the main across as I walk back to the cockpit.  I don't do this in more than about 10 knots of breeze.  In that case I come back and do a controlled gybe of the main by pulling in the sheet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

 

If you have a mainsheet rigged to be handled with large winches instead of a big tackle, you can have a boom brake on the mainsheet itself. I used to think this was stupid (and the winches are expensive if you have to buy them scratch) but it can work quite well.

I dislike hauling in the mainsheet to gybe, it slows the boat (making steering more difficult) and puts irregular forces on the rig & helm (making steering more difficult). If you leave the main out, bring the boat slightly by-the-lee, then use one part of the mainsheet tackle to haul, shift, then slow, the main coming over, then the boat can keep a steady course & speed. It also pulls the mainsheet up so the bight is less likely to snag on things as it sweeps across the deck. The problem is that hand-hauling the main up to and past centerline takes a good bit of grunt and you need good footing too. Sometimes it won't come and you have to turn more by-the-lee, and at some point it gets easier to tack.

There is also a maneuver I've used many times, once with a dramatic failure..... the North River gybe. This is where you leave the mainsheet out, and turn by-the-lee until the main is about to come over. Then spin the boat hard thru the gybe up to close-hauled (or thereabouts) on the new tack...... the main will swing over hard so you need to make sure the sheet isn't going to tangle.... and then luff/flog harmlessly with the wind itself as the brake. You then bear away, happy as a clam. The failure I had was with a full-keeled boat which would NOT turn fast enough, and the boom hit the lower shroud hard enough to dimple the spar section -and- distort the turnbuckle. Not a breakage but certainly could lead to it. Note to self- double check the length of the mainsheet to the stopper knot, too.

It's an argument against boats dependent on runners/checks for short handed cruising.

By the time gybing is actively dangerous, I'd strongly suggest tacking instead. As pointed out, gybing is hard on the rig and stuff can go very wrong.

FB- Doug

Even a block-and-tackle mainsheet acts as a boom brake.  You should have a low enough ratio on your 'fast' sheet so that you can pull it in while going slightly by the lee and then let it out in a controlled manner, even in a breeze.  That's pretty much the way your main sheet 'fast' ratio should be set on a small (under 40) boat.  Fast enough to pull in at the leeward mark, but with enough purchase that you can sheet in going dead downwind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, dash34 said:

Funny, I do the opposite.  I go to the mast, switch the pole, then push the main across as I walk back to the cockpit.  I don't do this in more than about 10 knots of breeze.  In that case I come back and do a controlled gybe of the main by pulling in the sheet.

I do that in very light air but if there's more that 6-8 knots or so I feel more comfortable with gybing the main first, but I'll give it a few tries with pole first and see how that goes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, dash34 said:

Funny, I do the opposite.  I go to the mast, switch the pole, then push the main across as I walk back to the cockpit.  I don't do this in more than about 10 knots of breeze.  In that case I come back and do a controlled gybe of the main by pulling in the sheet.

Ditto with asym on a pole on a small sporty. If over 20kt TWS, I typically go deep, jibe the fractional kite so wing-on-wing, then I toss the big square top main over. No sheeting in and out. Throw it over and drive down as needed to prevent it slamming over. If a big puff/wave and boat speed is way up, I revert to normal jibes. Either way, do it at speed. Don't wait for a lull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sailronin said:

I do that in very light air but if there's more that 6-8 knots or so I feel more comfortable with gybing the main first, but I'll give it a few tries with pole first and see how that goes. 

My boat is a frac - if I did the main first the kite would be a collapsed mess.  For a masthead the main-first program is probably a good choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Ajax said:

Your statement in bold is correct. This reduces the fatigue items that Slug is referring to.  In lighter winds, this really isn't a problem. In heavier air and lumpy water, I highly recommend combining this technique with a "boom brake."

+1 on a boom brake.

Important note tho', just before jibing ease the brake sheet somewhat so that the boom will come across (same as with a vang hard on). Otherwise it may hang up on the wrong side then jibe uncontrollably putting an enormous stress on the attachment point on the boom; likely to bend or break it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys.  You've confirmed a lot of my suspicions.  And no, I'm not talking about single handing with a kite as my boat doesn't have one but that is still good info I will tuck away for later.

Just finishing up a CNC mill conversion project so I'm thinking a boom brake will be a good first job for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with a chicken jibe when the wind is honkin' 

And preventers make me nervous. 

Crash jibes at night are a real danger - be wary about sailing too deep in the dark. 

image.jpeg.e32228cd16451c9fb53d703a01e4c2d9.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do the boom in first, tell Audrey auto helm to turn a bit, jibe the main, then the jib. Short handed the spinnaker stays at home or in the bag. We do fly the sissy chute.

Admiral Shirley steering, siissy chute up, wind building. Had the wind over right hand shoulder, veering to port, jibed as above, wind continued to port until off the beam. Dropped the boom to the puddle, hit 8 1/2 for a nanosecond, rounded up, ragged the sissy chute, bore off, dropped the sissy chute in the drink. Later noticed the bow sprit was badly bent. All in all a successful rushed jibe. No blood, no injuries. Built a much stronger bow sprit. If the waves are okay I will do the sissy jibe. Did many in a Laser, 'cause I always buggered up jibing in heavy air.

Admiral Shirley thought the boat would keep going over and we would drown. Bloody ex power boater.

Unkle Krusty

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like others have said haul in your main, boom to center as you turn the bow, then feed out the main a bit with help from the breeze. When your all good & pointed in proper position, let the boom out all the way or as far as you need for the best speed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a jib furler, consider furling the jib before the jibe, and unfurl on the new tack. Less flogging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Singlehanded gybing is kind of a drag on my boat because the end-boom sheeting, which is a 6:1 tackle, goes to a traveler that spans the cockpit immediately in front of the pedestal, and the bitter end leads out of the cam cleat at the bottom facing forward.  This means that in order to sheet in all that line, I'd have to be standing in the forward part of the cockpit, facing backwards, with the mainsheet itself between myself and the wheel.  I have not figured out a way to steer the boat facing backwards, handle the main, and avoid getting decapitated all at the same time.

Oddly enough, my boat likes to gybe the genoa before the main.  It usually collapses and I can gybe it to wing-on-wing well before the main wants to gybe.  This does make gybing somewhat more elegant, I think.

In light air, I stay behind the wheel, grab all 6 parts of the mainsheet and just help flip the boom to the other side and prevent all that loose sheet from snagging on the pedestal guard.

In heavy air that maneuver would probably cost me an arm and a rig, so I tack.

A boom-brake is on my wish list.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ZZ-

My setup is exactly the same. My mainsheet tackle swivels so I stay behind the wheel and trim in and ease it back out after passing through the eye of the wind.  Are your blocks somehow fixed so that the block on the traveler must remain with the cam cleat pointing forward?

I do have to re-orient it facing forward to ensure I don't get too many twists in the mainsheet, but this is easily done when you're settled on course for awhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, cameron said:

About gybing the spinnaker alone....on a +35' boat what to most do?  Dip pole or end for end?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Under most conditions, I use mid-boom preventers with 3:1 purchase when downwind, especially single handed.  I jibe the boat, let the main over with the preventer, set the traveller and lazy preventer then attend to the jib.  Not the fastest approach, but it certainly reduces the load on the boat.  

By the way, my autopilot can tack/jibe the boat, so once I tell it to jibe, I can attend to the main nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Great White said:

 

Great technique, really well done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thoughtful book Andrew and generous of you to make freely available to others.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I singleheand on my Cape Dory 27 I  will jibe by first bringing the jib or genoa over  to go wing on wing, then i stand in a crouching position with the tiller between my legs and sheet in the boom while turning the tiller to begin back filling the main. The boom comes over, I then start easing the sheet while the tiller is still between my legs and then I sit back down and adjust the jib trim if needed.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My procedure on a boat with wheel, traveller and German mainsheet system.

1. Sheet main in 2/3 

2. Pull traveller car over to the new side

3.take winch handle out of old leeward side and hold mainsheet in your hand running under/around the mainsheet coming off the boom to the traveller.

4. Steer a DDW, or just BTL, and make a little S wiggle on a wave to flick the boom over

5.ease mainsheet thru the winch on the new windward side as the boom bites in on the new leeward side. Steer up to about 170-160 twa.

6. Re-engage AP and gybe spinnaker 

I think this would work fine with a tiller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note the singlehanded technique here, rotation through the jibe angle, and the "pop" onto the new jibe.

200w_d.webp

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For sym I ease the sheet, disconnect pole, dip pole, attach lazy sheet, pop the tack, snuff the spin, move everything over the other side, disconnect the boom preventer, bring the preventer line to the other side, head back to the cockpit and jibe the main, reconnect the preventer, then finally redeploy the spin once on course. I don't do DDW unless I have both spin pole and boom preventer attached and I'm ready at the helm. If I'm in a narrow waterway I use asym and leave the pole out of the equation. I haven't had the boom swing across unintentionally for several years and I want the last time to remain the last time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this