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Evil Gnome

Marley Point 2018 50th Anniversary

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Just to keep in mind is the Marley Point overnight race this year, Saturday 10th of March should be a good rollup, the two F85's are going from Wangi, see if we can get more Multi's this year, Marley = very challenging but great experience.

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come out and play for the special days - you lil tart ...

hope it is a drifter like last couple of years & I'll smack your butts

:lol::P

Knowing my luck it'll blow and you will be tucked up snug in bed by the time we get out the river...

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Having not done this race before I'm interested in finding out a little  about Mclellans Strait between Lake Wellington and Lake Victoria.

Has anyone bothered to check the depth   and how much does the water level vary? 

My chart says it is shallower than 1.8metres?

I draw nearly 2metres with dagger board fully down.

Any info would be appreciated.

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Haven't done the race in 17 years, but the main issue used to be the entrance into the strait.  We used to pull the keel up 300mm for that area.  At the other end the channel it is nice and deep but its narrow so you'll be short taking if its a head wind.  The trick to doing well in the river is to have the tallest mast in your class and ignore the lower 50% of your sails.

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2 hours ago, The Mad Hatter said:

Having not done this race before I'm interested in finding out a little  about Mclellans Strait between Lake Wellington and Lake Victoria.

Has anyone bothered to check the depth   and how much does the water level vary? 

My chart says it is shallower than 1.8metres?

I draw nearly 2metres with dagger board fully down.

Any info would be appreciated.

I did it in Indian Chief in 2010 and had no problems through the straight. I do remember Mad Max hitting the bottom near the entrance close to the river bank coming out of Lake Wellington. Maybe pull your board up a third to be sure. On the way to the start from Paynesville i remember tacking all the way through the straight and going pretty close to the banks. Great race , I reckon its more of a cross country style of race. Enjoy.

 

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1 hour ago, Indian Chief said:

I do remember Mad Max hitting the bottom near the entrance close to the river bank coming out of Lake Wellington.

 

exactly. run a straight line from the last channel marker to the stbd side of the entrance and it gets real shallow.  If you do what most people do. Launch in Painesville the day before, lunch and/or dinner at Loch Sport then continue up stream to the start you can investigate the entrance on the way.

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Scarecrow and Indian Chief thanks.

Looking forward to experiencing this iconic race.

BTW:- Indian Chief do you remember the draft of  Indian Chief with the boards down?

Also interested in Mad Max's draft if anyone can advise on that.

Thanks.

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10 hours ago, The Mad Hatter said:

Having not done this race before I'm interested in finding out a little  about Mclellans Strait between Lake Wellington and Lake Victoria.

Has anyone bothered to check the depth   and how much does the water level vary? 

My chart says it is shallower than 1.8metres?

I draw nearly 2metres with dagger board fully down.

Any info would be appreciated.

I will have a detailed conversation with you over the weekend - last 2 years I have parked ... stories to tell ..

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9 hours ago, SCARECROW said:

.  We used to pull the keel up 300mm for that area. 

you bad baby ... tsk tsk

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35 minutes ago, Chidz said:

you bad baby ... tsk tsk

Don’t look at me, I was on the foredeck. 

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14 hours ago, The Mad Hatter said:

Scarecrow and Indian Chief thanks.

Looking forward to experiencing this iconic race.

BTW:- Indian Chief do you remember the draft of  Indian Chief with the boards down?

Also interested in Mad Max's draft if anyone can advise on that.

Thanks.

Although both cats have the same Mastrome boards, Indian Chief's are a bit longer. We drew 2.0 metres fully down. Mad Max probably 1.8 here's a shot of the two cats boards before mad Max's were painted. Both had Mastrome kick up rudders, although the new owners of MM have changed the rudders to sliding in a case T foils now

 

mmax2.jpg

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1 hour ago, Indian Chief said:

Although both cats have the same Mastrome boards, Indian Chief's are a bit longer. We drew 2.0 metres fully down. Mad Max probably 1.8 here's a shot of the two cats boards before mad Max's were painted. Both had Mastrome kick up rudders, although the new owners of MM have changed the rudders to sliding in a case T foils now

 

mmax2.jpg

I would like a couple of these if you have spares hanging around

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39 minutes ago, catsaler said:

I would like a couple of these if you have spares hanging around

We took moulds which are with a mate up at Tweed heads. PM me if you want his phone number. I have the same shape carbon boards in Top Gun now just blown up a bit as in longer and bigger chord. these shapes are also on the X40 cats

 

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Indian Chief, Thanks for the info and the pic. It's good to see we are talking the same numbers.

My first winter project is float rudders but after that I hope to make another shorter D/B.

I'll remove the taper that it has  and keep the same area.  

It will be more convenient and then I have a spare.

 

DSCN0366 (2).JPG

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16 hours ago, Tornado_ALIVE said:

Hopefully we will have the Corsair 760 at the event :D

mate, do it while you've got the boat there.  You'll love it.  Just make sure you have all the right safety gear etc. because it all gets checked.

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On 1/25/2018 at 2:39 PM, The Mad Hatter said:

Indian Chief, Thanks for the info and the pic. It's good to see we are talking the same numbers.

My first winter project is float rudders but after that I hope to make another shorter D/B.

I'll remove the taper that it has  and keep the same area.  

It will be more convenient and then I have a spare.

 

DSCN0366 (2).JPG

I saw your boat on the shore at Wangi on the weekend. You've done a nice job, love it. Well done.

 

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On 1/29/2018 at 3:22 PM, Indian Chief said:

I saw your boat on the shore at Wangi on the weekend. You've done a nice job, love it. Well done.

 

Thanks, that means a lot . I've always been a huge admirer of Top Gun.

 

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71 entries so far (compared to 28 this time last year)

including 5 multis ... but no Hatter or Sknotty yet ....

 

just sayin' - this is going to be good

 

AND, for those launching at the start - long promised dredging is happening & supposed to be completed by end of month ...

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Keith,

Having not done any of these races before  I plan to enter one at a time. HCW  24hr entry is in.   When I finish HCW  and the crew have not mutinied  I will enter Marlay Point.

Once MP is finished I'll enter B2B.

In the mean time I need to do some research on accom for B2B at Hervey Bay.. Any suggestions. 

BTW:-Accom is already booked for MP.

In both of these races the plan is to launch at the finish and sail to the start.

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B2b budget accom urangan harbour camp ground very boat friendly and can camp or get on site vans or neat cabins with big space they will let you park boat in. It is owned by boat club so very nice to us. Even when we launch start and a driver takes car trailer to urangan for club bus return they will store the rig cheap.

Otherwise Mantra and others are close and more upmarket.

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Looking at the Marley Point entries so far looks like a Farrier/Corsair race.

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On 1/25/2018 at 6:06 PM, Tornado_ALIVE said:

Hopefully we will have the Corsair 760 at the event :D

I had a look at it at Cronulla last Friday twilight...  very nice boat and easy to rig... I hope to see more of it

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3 weeks out and 123 entries so far!

8 multis and counting ...

 

This is going to be goood!

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Check out 2009 results Division M

First finish time

Mad Max 22:14:10

Two Tribes 22:14:38

Second finish time

Mad Max 23:28:15

Two Tribes 23:34:52

Elapsed time

Mad Max 3:43:15

Two Tribes 3:49:52

In before midnight, it was the fastest time and it was a magnificent night time sail, three quarter moon spinnaker run for miles and miles.

Marley it can be good be there!

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of course then there are the races where it takes longer than that just to go down the river....

Still worth it though.

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And other times when they call the race off due to too much wind... The only time I have attempted it

Is this actually the 50th race or have they included the years blown away?

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I did it probably more than 15 years ago on a mate's F-24, can't remember the exact year but I well remember bugger all wind for most of the course taking something like 12 hours+  to do the full course after becoming becalmed around the back of Raymond Island towards the finish for an eternity together with about 100 others going nowhere. Oddly we found the best way to negotiate the straits was to forget sailing and concentrate on fending the boat off the shores with paddles. Then there was the locals camped on either side, beers in hand at midnight shouting "encouragement". Good fun? Gotta give it a go then judge it.

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Quote off the website

"As of February 26th 2018 the Marlay Point Over Night Race has 145 Entrants, smashing last years numbers of 68 at this time.  "

impressive ...

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200+ now

and its shaping up as a drifter (again ...)

 

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On 1/25/2018 at 6:06 PM, Tornado_ALIVE said:

Hopefully we will have the Corsair 760 at the event :D

Do you have your entry in yet?

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NSW boat I raced previously was not available for this regatta.  Was hoping to be racing another Corsair there but it fell through a few days ago.

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4 hours ago, Tornado_ALIVE said:

NSW boat I raced previously was not available for this regatta.  Was hoping to be racing another Corsair there but it fell through a few days ago.

Bummer, I'm sorry to hear that.  Maybe you could work on getting one for B2B?

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The Multihull Central 760 will be at the Morton Bay Regatta the week after.  I am aiming to be sailing the B2B on her.

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26 minutes ago, Tornado_ALIVE said:

The Multihull Central 760 will be at the Morton Bay Regatta the week after.  I am aiming to be sailing the B2B on her.

Now that sounds like a plan.

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11 hours ago, The Mad Hatter said:

MPONR entries are up to 219 with one week to go.

 

bhahahaha - love the handicap they've given you ... you lil speedster you

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On 19/02/2018 at 7:28 AM, Evil Gnome said:

Check out 2009 results Division M

First finish time

Mad Max 22:14:10

Two Tribes 22:14:38

Second finish time

Mad Max 23:28:15

Two Tribes 23:34:52

Elapsed time

Mad Max 3:43:15

Two Tribes 3:49:52

In before midnight, it was the fastest time and it was a magnificent night time sail, three quarter moon spinnaker run for miles and miles.

Marley it can be good be there!

I’ll never forget going through the narrows that night..... or you roaring up behind us like a bat out of hell literally!!

i have been advised never to do another  Marley, that year was amazing!

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6 hours ago, Chidz said:

bhahahaha - love the handicap they've given you ... you lil speedster you

The front page tells me 219 but I can't get the entry list to load.

I'd be interested to see what other multis are coming?

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On 18 February 2018 at 8:02 AM, Chidz said:

3 weeks out and 123 entries so far!

8 multis and counting ...

 

This is going to be goood!

There should be some good stories to be told...

Someone might have had an adventure just getting to the lakes 

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So who's gunna give us the gory details. Heard rumours that a few sports boats got home first and someone got stuck in a tree or two. Sounds like it was deadly light and challenging. 

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I think the Gnome has become a tree hugger.

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The Marlay Point Overnight race of 2018 had a final entry count of 229 spread over 3 starts.

Following is the way it went down for the  Mad Hatter.

Early Saturday morning the breeze was non existent as we took off from a beach in Paynesville to motor the 31nm down to Lake Wellington Sailing Club at Marlay Point for the start of the race. We set the motor revs to a level that we could tolerate and kicked back to enjoy what was dawning to be a beautiful day. We were first overtaken by Eat Desert First whose motor was really thumping, and then the Evil Gnome. I later found out that while we were happy doing 4.8knots the Gnome was hammering along at 9knots. We past the Evil Gnome stopped at Hollands landing looking for fuel. The extra speed really sucks up the juice.

 

We arrived at Malay well before Evil but after Eat Desert. There was a festival going on around the Lake Wellington Sailing Club at Marlay Point and we planned on just chilling and waiting for the 7:45pm start. After dropping anchor and going ashore the breeze came in and really picked up out of the east, gusting to 17knots. This sowed the seed of hope among some of the veterans that maybe the 50th running of the Marlay Point Overnight Race will have a good breeze and may not be a drifter. As we approached the 7:45 start the breeze moderated and by kick off it was below 10 knots and falling. Still we managed to sit on around 5 knots of boat speed working the 9nm into the left over chop to cross Lake Wellington to Point Plover at the start of the McLelland Strait. By the time we made the straight the sun had completely set and last light was a distant memory.

 

We entered the strait with optimism and just around the first bend we found the Evil Gnome nose in to the bank. Our first thought was perhaps they had stopped for a nature break but we were quickly informed that their spinnaker pole had been making out with the local trees and it wasn't fussy. We sailed by as the failing breeze had almost failed completely. Still, all was good until we ran out of room and rather than make out with the stbd bank ourselves we decided to tack. After the tack we were unable to put the boat on a close hauled course and headed strait across the strait to the other bank. The more we tried to steer it close hauled, the more it refused. The steering was just not working at all. Rather than hit the bank we went with the flow and steered the boat the other way and this worked, but now we were heading towards the oncoming boats. We sailed back through the first following group and found a gap so we tried to turn to complete our first 360degree turn. This worked and we did get sailing again. As we approach the Evil Gnome for the second time we noticed they were now facing the wrong way but going in the right direction. Clive yells out "Hey Phill, how did you get to turn around?". I responded that I had no f****g idea. We sailed faster facing the right way than the Gnome could sail backwards and left them behind. Now all was going good until that stbd bank came up again but with a boat between us and calling "water". We tacked in accordance with our obligations and found ourselves again unable to go "close hauled" with no steering.

 

This time our Spi pole decided it didn't want to miss out on the fun and went for the trees on the other bank. Once they had fully mated Jack and Mike went fwd to forced a parting. We pushed off the bank and managed another 360. However this wasn't as good as the last one and we failed to get control of the boat again. Before we knew it we were back in the bushes and fully locked in. I also went fwd with a boat hook to help out and I hear a voice, "Hey Phill what are you doing". It was Eat Dessert First casually sailing by. At this point in time I'm really confused it seemed that the basic physics of sailing had been completely suspended for The Mad Hatter and probably the Evil Gnome.

 

A short time later we see Shockwave an F82 go by and appeared to be sailing fine except the rudder wasn't in the water. How was he steering? I was starting to think that we had gone down the rabbit hole and fully immersed in Wonderland. Alice should come skipping along anytime now.

 

After several more mating sessions between out spi pole and the local trees we were finally facing the right direction. But looking at the leaves in the water we were going backwards. By this time the moon had risen and we could see the rough outline of the trees on the bank and Jack pointed out that we were going fwd. Then the penny dropped. We had no steering because there was a current in the straights moving in the same direction and with no breeze, so there was no flow over the boards. No flow means no lift which results in no steering. While this reassured us that we may still be sane, it didn't help us steer the boat. The only thing it did give was the incentive to experiment.

 

We managed to work out a way by lifting and lowering the dagger board and rudder we could make the boat move in the right direction in a reasonably stable fashion. The only problem was it was facing across the strait and moving sideways.

 

While we were struggling with the new physics of sailing Clive motored up and declared he had had enough and was going home. We bid him good night and kept trying to refine our new skills. Despite our progress with the new dynamics we just couldn't get the boat to face the right direction like in the normal world of sailing and every now and then we would get it wrong and it would dive into the trees on the other bank.

Once it was locked in the trees it would stop moving fwd leaving it exposed to a "T" bone from approaching boats. After several very narrow escapes we decided to also pull the pin.

 

We took some depth sounding as we were leaving the strait near the port markers and it was barely deep enough for us to sail even with the board pulled up to deck level. That would have been an interesting time for us too had we not been beaten by the voodoo world of the strait.

 

No matter, we set the engine revs again to a tolerable level and kept on heading back.

 

We got there and back on the one 13litre tank of fuel. (Note to self taken for when running low on fuel.)

 

When we got back to Paynesville we packed the boat up and put it on the trailer just as the sun was coming up.

 

The crew did a great job and as the skipper I take full responsibility for pulling the pin. The experience gives me a great deal of food for thought. At this stage I believe the very flat underwater shape of the F85 hulls makes sailing, when the only breeze is the apparent caused by the boat being pushed by the current, very challenging.

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14 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

I think the Gnome has become a tree hugger.

I wish I had a can of spray paint and marked the trees which I hit so I can come back next time with chainsaw and exact my revenge!

One tree we hit 5 times as the current kept pushing us into it.

We were first boat into the river and 100 metres in we stopped, turned around and then went backwards and sideways from one bank with trees to the other bank with trees pushing off boats, one boat we heard said there's a boat coming head on, no we were going backwards facing at them, this lasted for three and a half hours when after hitting trees with the spi pole, getting forestay hooked, rudders caught on under water limbs, sides scraped apologising to at least 100 boats who were going in the right direction and pushing off them at about 1.30 we said that's enough.

Every tri went past us in those conditions, don't understand why but the other F85 couldn't steer either, we tried everything even when we pushed off a tree and were finally going the right direction we would slowly spin sideways or backwards or get sucked over onto the banks and trees, we tried everything but Evil Gnome was uncontrollable so to save damage to boat and others we pulled out.

Packing next morning the boat had sticks in the pole and leaf debris on both floats and tramps, a new experience.

Will we go back, hell yeah, it's such a challenge.

Evil

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On 3/9/2018 at 3:05 PM, Rushman said:

There should be some good stories to be told...

Someone might have had an adventure just getting to the lakes 

just might have ....
what a weekend - almost 16 hours elapsed time - my brain is still an absolute mush farm - will report later ...

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16 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

I think the Gnome has become a tree hugger.

we ALL did!

I just took my chainsaw with me ...

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You poor buggers.  Sorry but that's some of the funniest stuff I've read in a long time. Better luck next year. 

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4 hours ago, The Mad Hatter said:

At this stage I believe the very flat underwater shape of the F85 hulls makes sailing, when the only breeze is the apparent caused by the boat being pushed by the current, very challenging.

Its not the F85 hull shape that is the issue.  My first or second Marley in the early 90s there had been a strong wind blowing from the east for a week so when the wind dropped out for the race there was a heap of water looking to get out of lake wellington as fast as possible.  The result was everyone from Hartleys to Farrier tris drifting down the river at the same speed often backwards or sideways.  The monos with their comparatively big rudders could kind of stay facing the right way.  The tris basically became big dams and would run aground on every corner. 

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23 minutes ago, SCARECROW said:

Its not the F85 hull shape that is the issue.  My first or second Marley in the early 90s there had been a strong wind blowing from the east for a week so when the wind dropped out for the race there was a heap of water looking to get out of lake wellington as fast as possible.  The result was everyone from Hartleys to Farrier tris drifting down the river at the same speed often backwards or sideways.  The monos with their comparatively big rudders could kind of stay facing the right way.  The tris basically became big dams and would run aground on every corner. 

In zero true wind, if the current is going in the direction you want to go, you have wind on the nose and something for your sails to work with. If the current is against the you, the apparent wind is pretty much dead aft, and even if your sails are eased way off, boat speed is unlikely to surpass current speed, so you are literally dead in the water and subject to the vagaries of the current swirls....

Look for the edges, shallow water and back eddies!!

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It seemed to us it was really important to keep the sails on the side that had the best chance of being right. We did a lot of batten flicking during the night but pretty much keep going straight. This is also clearly easier in a smaller boat 

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Years ago I remember reading a report which claimed the fastest way through the straits was by setting the spinnaker...

Spinnaker dragging in the water with winch handles tied to the clews!

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53 minutes ago, Rushman said:

Years ago I remember reading a report which claimed the fastest way through the straits was by setting the spinnaker...

Spinnaker dragging in the water with winch handles tied to the clews!

Given our experiments on the night I would believe that. Problem is you may just have to replace that spinnaker if it got snagged. The depths through the straits was really good but there were snags near the banks.

 

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2 hours ago, SCARECROW said:

Its not the F85 hull shape that is the issue.  My first or second Marley in the early 90s there had been a strong wind blowing from the east for a week so when the wind dropped out for the race there was a heap of water looking to get out of lake wellington as fast as possible.  The result was everyone from Hartleys to Farrier tris drifting down the river at the same speed often backwards or sideways.  The monos with their comparatively big rudders could kind of stay facing the right way.  The tris basically became big dams and would run aground on every corner. 

The F85 will go nearly as fast side ways as fwd when it doesn't have proper flow over the boards. I've never sailed anything like it.  We didn't have a problem on the corners. Probably because we were balancing drag between the dagger board and rudder depths. 

As far as the tris are concerned I think   hulls with the finer underwater shape appeared to weather cock into the current as we were all going slower than the current with no true breeze. I think  that made it easier for them to point the right way. The F82 that went past had almost no rudder, kicked back with just the leading edge touching the surface,  and we did a little better with less rudder. Something that created a lot of drag off the bow that could be lowered in the water when we needed to straighten up would have helped a lot. Although a large rudder may help if you steered as if always sailing backwards which would explain why steering where I wanted to go usually made the situation worse.

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After thinking about it there was one thing we didn't try and that was to have everyone on the bottom hull in the centre sinking it as much as possible and lifting the windward hull out of the water. It would dig the float in deep and make it deeper and straighter so it was harder to go sideways, also lifting the windward float rudder would reduce the wetted surface area, still thinking about how it happened and how to stop it from happening again because if you sail Marley you will have it happen again.

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My turn now ...

Ooooo Phil & Clive … they were the funniest reports I had read in ages … as we had exactly the same problems!

As some had read/heard, we had all sorts of issues with our trailer on the way down on Thursday (bearings crapping out in Cooma; wheel falling off near Orbost), but we eventually made it thanks to the brilliant help from Stuart of Keels on Wheels, a mechanic in Cooma, Ken the towie from Bairnsdale and Russell from Riviera Trailers in Bairnsale – HUGE PROPS to these guys – you can’t beat country folks generosity and ‘make-it-happen’ attitude.

Once the trailer was fixed Friday morn, then a leisurely launch/rig arvo & catch up on some de-stress & sleep for what was shaping up be a real test. Good call in hindsight.

Sat morn headed off early. In expectation of light stuff I brought an extra jerry can of fuel & could afford to blow the cobwebs out of the lil donkey – gave it a good 6 knot run, waving to the Hatter on the way. We planned & stopped to take soundings either end of the Straits, as had parked there in previous years. Good intel. Then churned across the last lake and burn some of the fuel weight so we could have a nice lunch and rest before the battle commenced.

Start: dying breeze expecting it to shift to the left. Had a hole beautifully lined up mid line, then I blinked and screwed my timing up completely resulting in a late ‘n buried start– grr

Next couple of hours of drag racing across Wellington concentrating on clear air and keeping the boat consistently moving work fairly well to see us closing on the ‘Plover Point Parking Lot’ in not too bad condition and pulling up to the sterns of the leading pack – thought: “Ok now the games start” – Yup

After we passed a couple & rounded the first curve the dreaded ‘bye-bye steerage’ hit & the first of our many unintentional 360s happened – BITCH! Now, after half a century of racing, I tend to specialize in the light stuff, so wasn’t too worried about the conditions … but never (yeah, I know it was ‘Marlay’) in all the years of Canberra carnage; Georges river tides; yada yada; had I consistently had no control over the boat for that length of time. Hindsight, given how quick the current was running, there would have had to have been significant eddies present – normally not an issue for when there is a breeze – and I do not think it was a coincidence that the widest boats (tris) were having the most issues in this current.

And yes, quite often we were going faster backwards than the monoslugs going ’forwards’.

Yes, we span

And kept spinning.

Gnome and Hatter waved the white flag.

And yes, we ‘humped’ soo many trees (glad I had a shorter bow pole than the lads – could reach solid timber easier with my boat hook)

Finally, made it past Hollands and got a single port tack out of the mouth … then off up the lake.

The wind took us (aka drifted us) across to Loch Sport side – first of our groundings … on a mud bank NOT ON the map!!

Then slowly drifted up the lakes having several ‘micro-sleeps’ along the way.

Dawn – really too tired to appreciated how pretty it was – glad some others got photos so we can say ‘we were there’!

Through past the club for the first time with a light NWer and nice sunshine, around the top or Raymond with the kite up .. soooo hoping this would hold to the end – HA!

Saw the next group completely parked in a hole off the east of Raymond, and the breeze was holding close to shore, so did the sneaky and scooted up the land thinking I had gone past the extent of the north eastern mudbank … wrong, another grounding.

Freed ourselves and kept going, catching the 82R (Shockwave) with Big Mike & some unimportant monos. Then with a little puff of breeze to Shocky, a duel  ensued across the south of the island. As these guys had done Marlay soo many times & they were further inshore than us by this time, I was confident of the depth/course – mistake. First they hit, then we immediately hit. They got off and scampered, and we reparked with the rudder – this time I had to jump off the back of the boat to free it! (was quite pleasant on the water and this time sandyish to stand on). But now our goose was cooked.

In the distance while we were floundering around we could see all Hartley en-mass bringing the new forecast southerly up the lake … and we sat in nothing waiting for it.

And so we rounded the final corner and finished in about a 5 knot southerly right on the back of a wall of slow boats spread completely across the creek – at least it was interesting!

Of course, after we got the boat off the water and was trying to fold/pack sails – it came in 10- 12 knots, of course.

Elapsed time: almost 16 hours. Out of 12 entrants in our division - Scratch: 3rd across line. Hcp: 5th. Given the ‘fun’ we had … results could have been a hell of a lot worse!
Well done to Sknot for line honors & Shockwave for the handicap win … and congrats to everyone who finished – it was an adventure and a challenge … and I will be back again!

(photo credits goes to someone else off the Marlay Pt f/book site - I was too out of it to use a camera at this stage)

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Keith,

I find your report most disheartening.

You looked so controlled when you went by. 

I was hoping to learn your secret.

I am shattered.

Congrats on finishing. That was a massive achievement  given the ordeal you went through just to get there. 

 

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10 hours ago, The Mad Hatter said:

You looked so controlled when you went by. 

......

Congrats on finishing. That was a massive achievement  given the ordeal you went through just to get there. 

 

 

Ahh, control is just an illusion young man ;-)

"Illusion is the first of all pleasures." Voltaire

 

& thank you sir - I can be a stubborn lil prat when I want to be ...someone tells me I can't do something or puts a barrier in my way ... just got to get past that barrier for the new boat now (working on it ...)

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Great write-ups, gentlemen. Thanks for letting us in on your adventures. One question: were oars allowed? I guess these could help the boat pointed in the right direction under such circumstances, with one crewmember sitting on each float  to row forward or backwards.

file

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51 minutes ago, nyker said:

Great write-ups, gentlemen. Thanks for letting us in on your adventures. One question: were oars allowed? I guess these could help the boat pointed in the right direction under such circumstances, with one crewmember sitting on each float  to row forward or backwards.

file

No this event is raced under the Racing rules of Sailing (except as modified by colregs for sailing after dark).  So no means of propulsion except wind and pushing off tree branches.

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I pulled the pin and said "Never again !!!!!!!!"

I unrigged the boat and said "Never again !!!!!"

I drove home and said "Never again !!"

Told the misses "Never again......................."

Then I got to thinking,     I have an idea................ It should help keep the boat straight. 

After our little adventure I may need to find a new crew. 

Probably best if they haven't read any of this years reports.

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1 hour ago, The Mad Hatter said:

I pulled the pin and said "Never again !!!!!!!!"

I unrigged the boat and said "Never again !!!!!"

I drove home and said "Never again !!"

Told the misses "Never again......................."

Then I got to thinking,     I have an idea................ It should help keep the boat straight. 

After our little adventure I may need to find a new crew. 

Probably best if they haven't read any of this years reports.

Turn Pro (a) and leave a float at home? You and Evil could share a trailer and spare tyres and bearings?

 

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Assuming you are being carried by the current...

Big sea anchor off the bow, little sea anchor off the stern

Could you claim that you were heaving to for the night?

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Another thought,

If I didn't have float rudders I could have folded the floats in and pretended I was a mono, obviously quicker as about 100  boats passed me until Mr Tohatsu 9.8 helped me on my way.

PS I know that tree and I will be back!

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On 3/13/2018 at 11:18 PM, Evil Gnome said:

After thinking about it there was one thing we didn't try and that was to have everyone on the bottom hull in the centre sinking it as much as possible and lifting the windward hull out of the water. It would dig the float in deep and make it deeper and straighter so it was harder to go sideways, also lifting the windward float rudder would reduce the wetted surface area, still thinking about how it happened and how to stop it from happening again because if you sail Marley you will have it happen again.

Clive - We were one of the 100 boats that you apologised to!  I was sympathetic to your plight.

I think your theory here has a lot of merit - the other thing I was thinking about t is that there were definitely back eddys and areas of less current.  With all 3 hulls in the water it is much more likely that you will end up with different parts of the boat in different rates of current - this would account for the uncontrollable spinning.

There were times on the Castle that we noticed we were travelling at different rates to other boats (when nobody's sails were set)

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By the time you sailed past logic had gone out the door and emotion had taken over.

It gives me another year to work it out, Marley will not beat me! 

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13 hours ago, Evil Gnome said:

It gives me another year to work it out, Marley will not beat me! 

welcome to the addiction ...

 

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Mast head super light weight "Jibtop" flown off bow sprit and cut so it doesn't overlap forestay so it'll tack/gybe itself.  I work on the theory that if you carry something like that you'll never need it.

Used to love the "wind seeker" jib back when I raced keel boats.  Boat speed would go up 2 knots when you put it up and another 2 knots when you took it back down.

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