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oceaneer

Grey / Gray Dacron?...full Battens?

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So  I have been looking for a new Jib for our turbo Etchells.. As the old ones are really done with life. 

As we are not one design racing the boat we will make some PHRF changes to the shape. 

#1 Full Battens, the wind here is very light most of the time, and I am thinking of adding full battens to the sail to help it stay out in the light stuff... The Jib is only 100% as the shrouds go all the way to the sides of the boat so going bigger will mean upwind VMG may suffer.  So stupid Idea or OK?

 

#2 Color.,,,,I know this is super vain, but the new main is black poly, and I was thinking grey dacron would look nice.. is there any good grey dacron for a Etchells jib?

 

Thanks

Oceaneer

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I dont know etchells .

 In general I hate long battens. In light wind  They deform the sail shape , create maintenance,  make the sail hard to handle and add substantial weight..mass..to the sail.  When the wind is light with a seaway running , the sail with this extra weight suspended in the air ,  is not happy . 

your sailmaker should be able to pass on advice. 

 

 

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Sometimes a full batten is used at the top of jib to help keep shape longer. I wouldn't say results are conclusive one way or the other. Full length battens in entire jib would be a pita. 1) it's hard to read the luff in light-med air. 2) if they get stuck , you'll have to shake the hell out of the jib to pop them right way. That would cancel any possible benefit.  Etchells jibs should be easy to come by. Masthead Enterprises in St Pete has several used ones, only used 2-3 regattas. Not grey, but cheaper than new and fine condition.

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At least a few years back, Etchells jibs had a hybrid top batten pocket. You could run a full batten in heavier winds, and a partial length battens in lighter air, I think the crossover was around 6 knots.  Full battens in jibs are a negative in light air. 

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You could try the setup I have on my Gauntlet. Two battens at an angle to keep the shape in the light air. The sail is carbon and roller furled.

FFDB0466-1744-455D-9AFE-B9F6784CD93B.jpeg

7A35205D-96A5-4FB1-8722-1596CC70410F.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Sal Minella said:

grey like these?

grey Etchells Sails.jpg

Yes like 1373... what material is that??

 

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You DO know that those luff-parallel battens are in that orientation soley for roller-furling,  right ?   They don't impart shape for beans.  This is not new.

 

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Im surprised that people dont think that for uber light airs full battens work... as the main for sure works way better...

I would have thought that the same would hold true. As in the airs that the sails are just hanging some people take down the genoa/jibs and sail only on the main.... 

Odd

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Look at pictures of Minis to see all the non-overlapping Jib options for boats (jibs) about that size.  As for color if Doyle is doing grey there ya go ! any mainstream sailmaker can get you any color you want if you wish to pay for it!   again look at the mini's or Class 40"s for graphics etc... but it was pointed out used Etchells jibs are so cheap I have one rolled up under the sofa in my living room . 

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I like full battens in mainsails.   If I know that it will be a light air day I can increase the batten tension and create a more powerful mainsail shape. If it is windy full battens minimize damage in the case of a momentary (or longer) flog of the sail.  They prevent hard spots in the sail at the end of the battens which always occurs with partial battens when the sail hinges at the inboard end.  

Not so much for headsails.

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