arcpix

Garmin Instruments - Any Experience

Recommended Posts

We've had the Nexus NX 2 system on our J/30 for the 5 years that we've sailed the boat.  System is beginning to fail (transducers, server, etc.).  Some of the displays are still working just fine (Wind, Multi Display, 7" mast display) so we are looking at the Garmion suite of instruments with the GND10 bridge to allow us to use the old displays with the new system.  Also considering the wireless option instead of the wired option.

Has anyone used the Garmin (NEMA 2000) system and had an experiences, good or bad, that you can share?

We do typical club racing and an occasional distance race on Lake Michigan (not the Mac)

TT small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please consider investing in some decent pfds and crew work before dumping money into instruments. Pretty boat though.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about you answer the question asked and not critique. If nothing constructive to add, move on.

 I would be curious of peoples experience with Garmin instruments as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  I have done a lot of racing and a fair share of boat deliveries. B&G is what I have seen the most that last. They make a wireless system that that is controlled from a central laptop, and is easy to update.  Don't get me wrong Garmin is great but most of my experience has been with there hand held, witch we load up our ditch bag with. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Garmin make a lot of marine electronics - but mostly GPS/plotter/fishfinder type. My guess is that you will find the quality of the hardware excellent, clear UI, and the interoperability with other Garmin and other "standards-compliant" hardware also excellent. The most likely weakness of their offering will be in the specific sailing-related algorithms and features because it's such a low percentage of their market; it's going to be tough to get engineers allocated to that kind of R&D internally. So, I'd check carefully anything that you need when sailing that you don't need when motoring:

1. Visibility at a distance and at different angles - most power boat instruments are viewed up close

2. Algorithms for VMG, TWA, TWS, TWD, Slip/leeway - particularly second order effects like upwash correction

3. Racing specific features: Timer, start line distance/time

I'd be interested to hear your opinions/facts on that stuff because I suspect that their size and clear market momentum will continue to keep them lower priced than the custom sailing-related instruments.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

Garmin make a lot of marine electronics - but mostly GPS/plotter/fishfinder type. My guess is that you will find the quality of the hardware excellent, clear UI, and the interoperability with other Garmin and other "standards-compliant" hardware also excellent. The most likely weakness of their offering will be in the specific sailing-related algorithms and features because it's such a low percentage of their market; it's going to be tough to get engineers allocated to that kind of R&D internally. So, I'd check carefully anything that you need when sailing that you don't need when motoring:

1. Visibility at a distance and at different angles - most power boat instruments are viewed up close

2. Algorithms for VMG, TWA, TWS, TWD, Slip/leeway - particularly second order effects like upwash correction

3. Racing specific features: Timer, start line distance/time

I'd be interested to hear your opinions/facts on that stuff because I suspect that their size and clear market momentum will continue to keep them lower priced than the custom sailing-related instruments.

 

All their sailing instrumentation was developed by Silva (under the Nexus name) they are not starting from scratch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Christian said:

All their sailing instrumentation was developed by Silva (under the Nexus name) they are not starting from scratch

Correct, and some of them are compatible with Silva's previous systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/01/2018 at 7:33 AM, Squalamax said:

Correct, and some of them are compatible with Silva's previous systems.

If the quality of the instruments is on par with these compasses, stay well fucking clear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in the aviation world, garmin is king. My impression of them in the marine world is they roll out a new design every couple years and then tell you to get fucked if you have an issue with an older model. This may be limited to their chart plotters, though, for things like nav card comparability or updates. No first hand knowledge, just what i've read here or heard in passing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like everything it depends where in their product range you buy. If it's a low end Striker or EchoMap series then yeah a couple of years and they bring out a new version, if you buy a 7400 or 8400 series plotter you get a much longer service life.

But like all the big players these days, Garmin, Raymarine, Navico (B&G, Simrad, Lowrance) most of the units they sell are "sealed" so if an issue cannot be resolved with software fiddling they'll replace the unit (if in warranty period) and send the dud back to the factory to be refurbished and sold again as new.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/14/2018 at 3:04 PM, arcpix said:

We've had the Nexus NX 2 system on our J/30 for the 5 years that we've sailed the boat.  System is beginning to fail (transducers, server, etc.).  Some of the displays are still working just fine (Wind, Multi Display, 7" mast display) so we are looking at the Garmion suite of instruments with the GND10 bridge to allow us to use the old displays with the new system.  Also considering the wireless option instead of the wired option.

Has anyone used the Garmin (NEMA 2000) system and had an experiences, good or bad, that you can share?

We do typical club racing and an occasional distance race on Lake Michigan (not the Mac)

TT small.jpg

Nothing to add re Garmin, but that is one good lookin' J30!  Looks like she's been well-cared for and upgraded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've used Nexus/Garmin for both the J/109 (5 years) and the J/111 (6 years) but with a busy schedule, we get approx 2 years out of some of the components (wind, log, HPC-compass). If you have a good service contact it's definitely an option and good bang for the buck. 

I think the new Garmin displays are superb, but some transducers will have a limited lifespan. 

Wireless might be an option, but I still advise people to use cables to be able to hunt down problems.

I'm right now replacing it w B&G H5000 which is probably overkill for most.

And there seem to be lots of people who need spare parts for their Nexus systems :)

nexus-stuff-for-sale-1-770x911.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Blur said:

...

And there seem to be lots of people who need spare parts for their Nexus systems :)

 

Blur - with that inventory you could become the Swedish exporter of the Nexus product once again!  Thread hijack here - did you use a flush housing for the TH43 speed xducer, or the stock mushroom mount housing.  I know you had it on the centerline for your boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/26/2018 at 5:21 AM, Gorn FRANTIC!! said:

Like everything it depends where in their product range you buy. If it's a low end Striker or EchoMap series then yeah a couple of years and they bring out a new version, if you buy a 7400 or 8400 series plotter you get a much longer service life.

But like all the big players these days, Garmin, Raymarine, Navico (B&G, Simrad, Lowrance) most of the units they sell are "sealed" so if an issue cannot be resolved with software fiddling they'll replace the unit (if in warranty period) and send the dud back to the factory to be refurbished and sold again as new.

That's not entirely true, Garmin hosed a whole lot of people with the 3000 series, I'm one of them, which were not cheap in their day.  They dropped support for any chart updates at 2008 or 2010, I can't remember.  They used a proprietary chip card (unlike everyone else who used CF or SD cards) and when hackers figured out how to pirate the charts, they stopped updating them. Fuck Garmin, I bought a ton of their stuff in the past but never again.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-01-26 at 11:49 PM, WHK said:

Blur - with that inventory you could become the Swedish exporter of the Nexus product once again!  Thread hijack here - did you use a flush housing for the TH43 speed xducer, or the stock mushroom mount housing.  I know you had it on the centerline for your boats.

:-) most of it is gone.

I flushed it, but with the original mushroom housing on both the J/109 and the 111. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2018 at 8:29 AM, DrewR said:

That's not entirely true, Garmin hosed a whole lot of people with the 3000 series, I'm one of them, which were not cheap in their day.  They dropped support for any chart updates at 2008 or 2010, I can't remember.  They used a proprietary chip card (unlike everyone else who used CF or SD cards) and when hackers figured out how to pirate the charts, they stopped updating them. Fuck Garmin, I bought a ton of their stuff in the past but never again.   

the new aviation stuff from Garmin finally uses SD cards instead of a propitiatory card...then they charge $150-250 (can't find the page for it ATM) for it! several sources say any SD card formatted to FAT32 works, though... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/26/2018 at 3:33 PM, Blur said:

We've used Nexus/Garmin for both the J/109 (5 years) and the J/111 (6 years) but with a busy schedule, we get approx 2 years out of some of the components (wind, log, HPC-compass). If you have a good service contact it's definitely an option and good bang for the buck. 

I think the new Garmin displays are superb, but some transducers will have a limited lifespan. 

Wireless might be an option, but I still advise people to use cables to be able to hunt down problems.

I'm right now replacing it w B&G H5000 which is probably overkill for most.

And there seem to be lots of people who need spare parts for their Nexus systems :)

nexus-stuff-for-sale-1-770x911.jpg

anything left?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a full setup of Garmin on our race boat, installed by myself 12 months ago not a single issue after 4000 nm mostly offshore in a lot of crap weather.

Setup includes wind, depth,plotter, AIS, and Autopilot all Garmin.

Don't even bother with wireless as the signals are too laggy and are a pain in the backside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have an older Nexus server with compass, Garmin nWind transducer, and some older B&G speed and depth transducers.  We then added a GND10 bridge to pass data to NMEA 2000, where we have B&G Triton displays and two Garmin 721xs plotters.  Overall works fairly well.  We also have a Garmin AIS 600.  

Generally pleased with the GND10 setup and Nexus server setup.  The Nexus equipment however is very finicky and seems to die little by little over 3-5 years.  In 5 years, we've replaced the Nexus server a couple of times, the nWind transducer once (from the Nexus branded to the Garmin nWind version).  One Garmin 721xs already has touchscreen problems, so needs replacement (note: the plotters are exposed in the cockpit in a fairly harsh tropical environment).  Garmin's support team is generally very helpful and has done various exchanges at good prices each time.  So still decent value.

Today with NMEA 2000 I think you have options to mix/match more, so for example you could use a combo of B&G and Garmin/Nexus.  Not everything can be mixed however -- e.g. you still need some "brains" (server/plotter) from the same brand as your wind transducer to use advanced calibration.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my boat (Mumm30) we had a NKE system that was really old and not really working. 

We replaced it with a complete Garmin system, Gwind race, 3 X GNX120, spedo, gps, barometer and a Maretron gyro compass

Initially we where really happy with it but when we tried to calibrate using the Garmin system it was unusable. Basically calibrating TWA was not possible to get right and getting a consistent accurate boat speed was also useless. we had a 5-7% error all the time

So to resolve that we bought a laptop with expedition and used that to recalibrate all the instruments and then send the values on deck as custom channels. This worked ok, but the damping on the custom channels + some noise makes the wind angles jump a bit to much. Better but not great.

At the end of the last season i bought a B&G H5000 Hercules cpu in the hope that i could recalibrate everything and send the n2k sentences to the Garmin displays. This works really well. Since then the instruments are much better in terms of numbers, and filters etc and the Garmin GNX displays are really great. The only thing to make sure is the setup of sources in the displays. Once thats done - its all magic.

We still use expedition to send targets and nav data to the displays. The wind angles and speed cals on and  the H5000 and the nice Garmin displays works great for us. 

I really like the N2K standard as it makes everything compatible. The only problem we had was that we could not access the h5000 from the Garmin instruments - so we have a b&g zeus2 waiting to get fitted.

 

So after we fitted the H5000 cpu our numbers are much better, much more stable with a lot less noise. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

B&G Zues3 (With or without H5000) deserves a look.  There is a review of a B&G install on a J/109 that appears in last weeks February 2018 Practical Sailor Magazine.

B&G has superior sailing focused features and is now priced down in the same range as the other major brands like Garmin / Raymarine / etc

On the plus side for Garmin the instrument displays have prettier graphics, for example the display of wind direction and speed against heading. 

On the plus side for B&G, it has superior sailing features in the Zues3 / Triton2 product line, even before you add the H5000. Go for an H5000 and you get more precise sailing math from more calibration options, get the ethernet protocol direct to your computer either wired or wireless (use a standard browser from a laptop or smartphone over WiFi) bypassing any need for messy interfaces to NMEA-2000, etc to the computer. Expedition has added support for the direct ethernet connection which is a big plus.

Ask Eric at Farrallon electronics for help around a B&G setup including the reuse of Nexus displays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One year and the screen of my B and G has failed . B and G is overhyped 

i have had good luck with raymarine instrumentation ...no failures in the system 

i dont know garmin .  Price compare it against Raymarine 

 

P1090886.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

One year and the screen of my B and G has failed . B and G is overhyped 

i have had good luck with raymarine instrumentation ...no failures in the system 

i dont know garmin .  Price compare it against Raymarine 

B&G doesn't have a lock on the failure issues.  I replaced older C90W (Helm) and C70 (Nav Station) Raymarine MFDs with e125 at the helm and e97 at the Nav station in 2015.  The e125 internal gps died after 1 year and the rotating control knob became "jumpy" when rotated.  I can say that I am pleased with the software upgrades Raymarine pushed (Lighthouse II updates). 

The B&G T41 Triton display I added in 2015 has been rock solid. 

The older Nexus NX2 and XL displays suffer from occasional fogging that is a known problem.  Someday I will replace these with whatever N2K display looks good when the Nexus displays fail.  At least they are functional and are easy to read.  I installed a Garmin Nexus GND10 in 2015.  The USB port died and I sent it back to Garmin this winter to be repaired at a flat rate (out of warranty).  The cost to repair was reasonable with quick response, unlike some vendors that soak you so badly they force an upgrade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...i just asked for warranty on the B and G ...we shall see.

additionally the B and G uses a remote control.....Pointing device ...this remote siezes up...and must be unplugged , then replugged ...to function 

somekinda  signal roadblock .

THe B and G chart package...... Cmap...is low quality , it should not be used  for navigation 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, slug zitski said:

THe B and G chart package...... Cmap...is low quality , it should not be used  for navigation 

Agree totally on the low quality CMap charts on the B&G.  I installed Zes2 and Vulcan on friends boats and recommended they immediately purchase the Navionics chips.  I will say that Raymarine tech support both online and on the phone is much more knowledgeable and responsive than the B&G folks I have had on the line.  I was troubleshooting a problem on the Vulcan regarding N2k source selection that turned out to be a bug in the B&G software.  It was 18 months ago and to this day, I am not aware of any patch or update that has been issued.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, slug zitski said:

i have had good luck with raymarine instrumentation ...no failures in the system 

2
2

How was the luck with calibration? :)

Every system has its pros and cons. Nothing is perfect. 

Have been running C-MAP (in Expedition) and Navionics (on Raymarine e7 - now being replaced by Zeus3 - and iPad) without any issues in the worlds busiest archipelago races. Prefer Navionics because of plotter sync and some other cool features. Also, the update rate is pretty awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blur said:

How was the luck with calibration? :)

Every system has its pros and cons. Nothing is perfect. 

Have been running C-MAP (in Expedition) and Navionics (on Raymarine e7 - now being replaced by Zeus3 - and iPad) without any issues in the worlds busiest archipelago races. Prefer Navionics because of plotter sync and some other cool features. Also, the update rate is pretty awesome.

If you need scientific  data gathering you have a tough job.

 I never trust anything that the  instrument systems say.  Boat speed can be perfect one minute, then you pick up a blade of sea grass in the paddle wheel.   Wind angle perfect, but you are sailing in 10 degrees of wind sheer, crew gear gets stowed to close to the compass and everything is wonky . Whats important is that the system functions  and the displays are visable and robust .

as for chart systems...thats about sixty miles on the screen.   On the C map those 5 islands, lighthouse and radar beacon are not visable.  The offshore gas platforms are not charted

 On the Transas they are all visable.  When you  electronically navigate you use your eye and colour contours to spot danger  ...when you see all clean water you proceed.  Both c map and navionics fail...inshore with these system you are actually looking at depth numbers...never with Transas, contour and colour is always correct.p

P1090887.jpg

IMG_8152.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, slug zitski said:

I never trust anything that the  instrument systems say.

An unusual approach if you want a data-driven approach to performance and decision making?

We find that data is good 99% of the time (Nexus/Garmin NXR w best practice calibration) and is extremely helpful for performance analysis vs targets, starts, next leg analysis, routing etc.

In post-race analysis, it's common that we were wrong and should have trusted the software :o

On charts, if you want to use Expedition or a "normal" plotters you have to get Navionics (or C-MAP) to work. I find it mostly comes down to settings and procedures for zooming (re the advice from the Vestas report). I have no issue getting the coloring right in Navionics. Use both Transas and Seapilot as excellent complements on iPad. 

 

BTW. This is our typical race course - so we tend to be somewhat picky about our tools :) 

Different approaches to details/zooming, but no major difference in shading or usability.

archipelago_transas.jpg

archipelago_navionics.jpg

archipelago_seapilot.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Data guys are looking at the instruments....i see the cloud, tack , then sail right by  them .

data has its place when you are blind sailing . 

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Data guys are looking at the instruments....i see the cloud, tack , then sail right by  them .

data has its place when you are blind sailing . 

It’s not an either/or situation, with good instruments it’s an AND situation if you have a clue.

Well functioning and calibrated instruments are worthwhile, especially if you want to be fast at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Trevor B said:

It’s not an either/or situation, with good instruments it’s an AND situation if you have a clue.

Well functioning and calibrated instruments are worthwhile, especially if you want to be fast at night.

Everything is nice !  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Trevor B said:

It’s not an either/or situation, with good instruments it’s an AND situation if you have a clue.

Well functioning and calibrated instruments are worthwhile, especially if you want to be fast at night.

I would say it's essential if you want to get 100% out of a modern cruiser/racer. Especially if you're getting into a new boat that lacks a good local OD fleet and have limited time (who doesn't).

There's no way to find crossovers, optimum VMG or evaluate the difference in trim or crew placement without proper instrumentation. Or see if you're lifted or not without a compass. Often something that feels worse is actually faster, both sailing the boat flat upwind as well as soaking downwind. And I still havn't met the guy who kan feel the difference in current down to 1/10 of a knot.

Looking at the top boats in a competitive fleet like C&C30 or Melges 32 this isn't really a discussion. ALL boats have this as a top priority. Even more so in offshore classes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/29/2018 at 5:43 PM, Blur said:

I flushed it, but with the original mushroom housing on both the J/109 and the 111. 

I'm curious as to why you decided to flush mount it? Garmin (and Nexus before them) talked a lot about getting the paddlewheel below the "barrier layer" of attached water... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jarcher said:

I'm curious as to why you decided to flush mount it? Garmin (and Nexus before them) talked a lot about getting the paddlewheel below the "barrier layer" of attached water... 

Why? The primary reason is to get it on the centerline, to get the same reading on both tacks. Then the flange doesn't work as intended. Bonus is lower resistance :-)

I guess the "barrier layer" behaves differently there since we got it to perform extremely well on both boats. 

j109details_09.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Blur said:

Why? The primary reason is to get it on the centerline, to get the same reading on both tacks. Then the flange doesn't work as intended. Bonus is lower resistance :-)

I guess the "barrier layer" behaves differently there since we got it to perform extremely well on both boats. 

j109details_09.jpg

Oh that makes sense. If you were installing it offset from the centerline, would you have still flush mounted it? I have no idea about whether the "barrier layer" exists, but the Silva/Nexus guys who were involved with the design of this device did tell me it's real.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jarcher said:

Oh that makes sense. If you were installing it offset from the centerline, would you have still flush mounted it? I have no idea about whether the "barrier layer" exists, but the Silva/Nexus guys who were involved with the design of this device did tell me it's real.   

Guess so. Naturally, there are boundary effects around the hull, but the flow here should be laminar with perhaps 1 mm or "barrier layer". The tip of the wheel is well beyond that. With the original mount, you create turbulence that seems more unpredictable than anything else.

And it's not a coincidence that the mounts have looked the same for 50+ years (should we guess it's because they're easy to mount)?

We're now changing to B&G, and they/Airmar have no problem shipping a flush mount :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Blur said:

Guess so. Naturally, there are boundary effects around the hull, but the flow here should be laminar with perhaps 1 mm or "barrier layer". The tip of the wheel is well beyond that. With the original mount, you create turbulence that seems more unpredictable than anything else.

And it's not a coincidence that the mounts have looked the same for 50+ years (should we guess it's because they're easy to mount)?

We're now changing to B&G, and they/Airmar have no problem shipping a flush mount :o

Blur - why not use the existing Garmin transducer with the B&G?  I assume you are installing the H5000 which should be able to accept the analog output of the GST43 sensor directly.  Much less work and probably a sensor with better performance than the Airmar due to the larger paddlewheel on the Garmin.  I took your suggestion and mounted the Garmin GST43 housing on a friends J/109 similar to the way you had it on Blur.  The picture below doesn't do show the profile well but you can see the fairing compound sanded for the speed on the centerline, old speed hole plugged and faired, and the depth faired.

vfkLSS8KMfdBhxVm3g3kO1ua3BzZQbMMDW2AH_Q1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, WHK said:

Blur - why not use the existing Garmin transducer with the B&G?  I assume you are installing the H5000 which should be able to accept the analog output of the GST43 sensor directly.  Much less work and probably a sensor with better performance than the Airmar due to the larger paddlewheel on the Garmin.  I took your suggestion and mounted the Garmin GST43 housing on a friends J/109 similar to the way you had it on Blur.  The picture below doesn't do show the profile well but you can see the fairing compound sanded for the speed on the centerline, old speed hole plugged and faired, and the depth faired.

 

The biggest reason for me was quality. We burnt through 7 Nexus sensors (4 on the J/109 and 3 on the J/111). Second is to replicate a "standard setup" to get proper help with calibration. Also, it's always fun to move through-hulls around :lol:

Here's the status right now (Swedish):
http://www.blur.se/2018/02/26/j-111-blur³-bg-h5000-installation/

blur-bg-inst-drilling.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Blur said:

The biggest reason for me was quality. We burnt through 7 Nexus sensors (4 on the J/109 and 3 on the J/111). Second is to replicate a "standard setup" to get proper help with calibration. Also, it's always fun to move through-hulls around :lol:

Here's the status right now (Swedish):
http://www.blur.se/2018/02/26/j-111-blur³-bg-h5000-installation/

 

That is a very impressive article about the instrument upgrade!  You have "artists and professionals" demonstrating high quality craftsmanship in the photos.  It will be interesting to read your posts in the future about using the instruments once Blur is back in the water again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Blur said:

The biggest reason for me was quality. We burnt through 7 Nexus sensors (4 on the J/109 and 3 on the J/111).

Interesting... I used the same 43mm red paddlewheel transducer for 8 years and only stopped because I sold the boat. The Garmin one is sufficiently better than the Airmar one that I'm switching from the ST610 to the Garmin. I just wish Airmar didn't have the patent of the flap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Along these lines, I'm curious what data you guys like to see, in the cockpit and on the mast. 

I like boat speed and heading on the mast where everyone can see it. I also like to see TWS on the mast so the sail trimmers and everyone else can see it. That's handy for sail selection. In the cockpit I like to see TWA upwind and AWA downwind, or both at the same time. Nexus also has a next tack data line which is nice. Oh, yeah, and depth never hurts; Greenwich Bay is really shallow. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jarcher said:

Along these lines, I'm curious what data you guys like to see, in the cockpit and on the mast. 

 

On the mast we keep info to sail the boat as fast as possible: BSP + TWA (sometimes AWA upwind) w big numbers. This correlates to target numbers posted in the cockpit. Upwind we talk target BSP, downwind target TWA.

Also on the mast TWS/TWD + PolBSP% + sometimes VMG + HDG naturally.

In cockpit we focus on tactical numbers. Most come from Expedition.

  • set/drift or damped BSP/SOG HDG/COG to figure out current/tide - and to hit max/min
  • time on starboard /port (to get a feel for where we are on the course), time to laylines
  • BRG/RNG/time to mark
  • TWA next leg = sail choice talk
  • Depth

All numbers are on the navigators iPad, but shorthanded it's nice to have on the displays + it keeps the stress level down :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now