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avenger79

would you buy a boat in another state

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looking for opinions. 

 we are going to FL to look at a few boats. thinking about purchasing a boat there and leaving it in a slip so when we visit we would have a place to stay as well as a boat to sail. 

couple questions

 would you do this

 what should we be aware of when leaving it

would it be better to leave it in a slip or haul it and put on a cradle

we get down there roughly 4 times a year although that looks like it might increase as well as the thought of moving there in the next couple years. 

I do have my dad there so he would be able to check on the boat at least once a week and run the motor etc. 

up here I stick to trailer boats or crewing on other's larger boats so learning about slipping a boat will be new.

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A boat that sits unused and unmaintained for months in Florida is going to be a nasty mess in short order.

You need to make sure for father is up for this task or hire someone.

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Don’t let anyone run a diesel motor for you once a week. You’ll kill it quickly. 

As far as the rest...lot of cheap boats in FL. You’ll have to clean the bottom before you go sailing if you leave it in year round. 

Marinas have travel lifts so leave the boat on land with the rig up and have it dropped in when you go down. Same price as leaving it in a slip without the wear, tear and worry.

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What types of boats are you looking at? I agree that if its in the water you will need someone who can check on it regularly, bilge pumps fail, lines chafe.

You should consider that if you keep it out of the water, you would not be able to run the motor at intervals or the a/c if it has it. Generally in the south we run the a/c even when we're away to keep the moisture down to prevent mildew. You could also get a plug-in dehumidifier if its on the hard.  Having it hauled in and out as needed isnt free, but might be cheaper than keeping it in the water if only used 4 times a year.

The insurance premiums will be a lot higher than you are used to since you will have it in a hurricane area.

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Yah...boats make very very very expensive apartments.

small boats that fit on a trailor are OK 

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all good points so far. thanks. keep them coming. 

 

Mark Set, yeah forgot about that one. hmm my car premiums quadrupled when I was down there for a while, actually wound up leaving them insured up here and telling my agent where we were staying for a while. 

I do think it might be easier on the boat and better to have it hauled and set on cradle when we aren't there. 

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44 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Don’t let anyone run a diesel motor for you once a week. You’ll kill it quickly. 

 

What's your logic on that? We sail once a week, have been doing so on the same boat for 10 years.

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The engine must get hot....boil water vapor from the oil

an unloaded diesel..idle speed is not happy

normally an engine can be serviced, winterized and put to sleep for the season.

in some environments it may be better to run it every now and again 

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we run maybe 10-15 minutes at less than 5 kts boat speed, I would guess pretty low RPMs, 

does the use of atomizers and biocides change the equation?

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No idea.   If you go to an industrial diesel supplier they will give you a choice called duty cycle...some engines are designed to run continuously at rated power..forver...some engines are designed to perform in a stop and go cycle....some  for low output, high output.

 

you would need to ask a diesel engineer for an explanation.

a normal small craft pleasure diesel has a mixed duty cycle..allpurpose

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you are correct about running under load, but I did intend to have him motor the boat around a bit to run the motor. not sure I would have him do that weekly, maybe more monthly. 

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the professional advice ive gotten was to run it and let it get to operating temperature. Thats not a problem in neutral in my experience, takes 10 minutes or so. Every week is probably overkill though, I like to run mine at least once a month and we use it at least that much.

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The only way to know is to sample the oil...

i notice that my oil burn increases with stop and go and that the oil rapidly goes black 

the logical defense is to change the oil at shorter intervals

also keep an eye out for carbon buildup in the exhaust

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It is hard on a light duty deisel engine to start, run and stop without a good warm up, loading and proper cool down cycle. You say no problems in 10 years with yours. You may be lucky, but I don’t think a 10 minute run at low rpms and light loading are doing an engine any good. 10-15 minutes per week per decade equals around 130 hours. Should barely be broken in and may, in fact, show more wear than a motor with many times that on the hour meter.

Not an accusation of negligence, I don’t have a clean record of maintainance myself.

I was referring to having “Dad” going to a boat at a slip and running a diesel motor under no load to “keep er lubed” or to “keep the charge up on the battery”. Those short runs do way more damage than good. No problem on a gasoline motor, though...

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Given you only expect to use it 4 times a year, wouldn't it be easier/cheaper to just charter something for those 4 times a year.  Granted, you wouldn't have all your stuff you would normally keep on it, but a lot of the hassle goes away.  May even be able to charter something nicer/bigger.  I'd have to sit down and do some math to see how it would work out for me personally.

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first I did not intend for my dad to run the boat weekly, more check on it weekly and run it now and then. 

 

it would probably be cheaper and easier to charter except one of the "things" we want with us is our dog. wouldn't want to worry about her chewing or harming someone elses boat. Also I don't like renting things. never have. 

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I have been a commuter cruiser for 10 years now. If you don't mind having someone there do all the maintenance (and don't mind paying for it) then it's OK. If you expect to do some or all of the maintenance, you will find it very wearing. You show up for your week on the boat, carrying all the tools and supplies you thought you will need from 1000 miles away and your list from the last visit. You spend the first three days of your week working through your list, discovering that you don't have what you need, trying to track down what you need. No time to order something from Defender, got to buy it locally, whatever they have for whatever price they charge. On the sixth day of your week you are defrosting the fridge, cleaning everything up and putting it to bed, making a list of all the things you have to do next time. So you got three days of sailing in out of your week. That's kind of the grim reality. There is no possibility of showing up on a Saturday afternoon and puttering around taking care of a few things - all has to be done at once. 

Now with an open checkbook and a good yard, you just make some phone calls and write some checks. But they will be big checks, and good yards are hard to find. 

If you can find a place that will dry store with reasonable launch/retrieve fees, that will help - but the Florida climate is brutal on a boat in or out of the water. If you had a boat with a tabernacle mast that could be stored indoors, now you have a chance of keeping it nice without a lot of maintenance. 

On the diesel, just run in once a month, long enough to get it nice and warm. You don't need to leave the dock, just run it at medium rpm in gear, still tied up for 15 minutes. These myths about diesels are hard to kill. There are probably 1000 times as many diesels running around in cars, light trucks, and heavy trucks. The drivers of these vehicles don't think twice about running them stop and go, and they last a very long time. 

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Charter or get a powerboat that fits on a forklift and is kept in a boatel. Insurance agents *hate* unattended boats in hurricane zones FYI.

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Have you thought about a boat partnership with an local? Boat cost ya half, and ya dad has no worries about running the motor. Partner would keep it clean for hopefully in exchange for a long distance , occasional user/partner.

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On 1/19/2018 at 8:37 AM, Sail4beer said:

It is hard on a light duty deisel engine to start, run and stop without a good warm up, loading and proper cool down cycle. You say no problems in 10 years with yours. You may be lucky, but I don’t think a 10 minute run at low rpms and light loading are doing an engine any good. 10-15 minutes per week per decade equals around 130 hours. Should barely be broken in and may, in fact, show more wear than a motor with many times that on the hour meter.

Not an accusation of negligence, I don’t have a clean record of maintainance myself.

I was referring to having “Dad” going to a boat at a slip and running a diesel motor under no load to “keep er lubed” or to “keep the charge up on the battery”. Those short runs do way more damage than good. No problem on a gasoline motor, though...

It’s not good to run any engine for a few minutes a week.

Each run will fill the engine spaces with hot air. As the air cools the water vapor will condense out creating more moisture in the engine that if you had just left it alone.

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In another state? You mean a different state than the one I am in now? How about in a state of inebriation, which I will be soon...

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2 hours ago, Last Post said:

In another state? You mean a different state than the one I am in now? How about in a state of inebriation, which I will be soon...

Inebriation can lead to boat purchases.

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Running a deisel for a few minutes a week at low RPM. No good.

Running a deisel for an hour a week at low/mid/high RPM. OK. 

In colder weather...better to run your engine at low/mid/high an hour or preferably more, and ideally more than once a week even though this commonly doesn't happen. In this case running the engine robustly is way better than nothing at all.

If you commonly sail just once a week, it's a good idea to give the engine a good work out. If suitable, motor for a half hour on your way out and another half on your way back in. Deisel like to run way more than not.

To the OP. Leave your Dog with your dad and go charter something for a day or two.

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