Maroon

Sailors Powerboat

Recommended Posts

Kokopelli, give us some details! Looks excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kokopelli said:

This sailor's power boat..

21 ft of home built fun, and runs on fumes.

 

DSC04947croppedsmall.jpg

DSC05110cropped small.jpg

DSC05144small.jpg

Fexasesque in the sense that there is not a straight line anywhere in any angle.
Did you design it?
Did you build it?
Inquiring minds want to know.
This is obviously (?) near Tacoma?

I like the color, is it stain?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted something light to tow, efficient, and different. I designed SYHOJA in the sense that I copied what everyone else was doing, i.e. bowflare  of a carolina sportfish, pulled out the entry a bit for finer entry and longer waterline, and added a bit of Maine lobster boat (if you squint) with a bit of tumblehome in the stern.  Then built her in my garage.  The concept was for a very efficient minimal cabin cruiser for Puget Sound, the islands, and up the Sunshine coast of BC on minimal fuel.  We cruise at 16kn on 2 gal/hr, and top out at 26 kn with a 60 hp E-tec.

Construction is 30x13mm cedar strip composite and Nidacore honeycomb for flat panels and cockpit floor.  The boat is mostly clearcoated on the decks and inside. The hull is not a stain, but the clear carbon laminate over the cedar hull.  

LOA: 6.50 m

BOA: 2.15 m

Weight: 1,475 lbs

Displacement: enough for 3 for a week of camping cruising

Fuel: 30 gal

Power: 60 hp Evinrude E-tec.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kokopelli said:

I wanted something light to tow, efficient, and different. I designed SYHOJA in the sense that I copied what everyone else was doing, i.e. bowflare  of a carolina sportfish, pulled out the entry a bit for finer entry and longer waterline, and added a bit of Maine lobster boat (if you squint) with a bit of tumblehome in the stern.  Then built her in my garage.  The concept was for a very efficient minimal cabin cruiser for Puget Sound, the islands, and up the Sunshine coast of BC on minimal fuel.  We cruise at 16kn on 2 gal/hr, and top out at 26 kn with a 60 hp E-tec.

Construction is 30x13mm cedar strip composite and Nidacore honeycomb for flat panels and cockpit floor.  The boat is mostly clearcoated on the decks and inside. The hull is not a stain, but the clear carbon laminate over the cedar hull.  

LOA: 6.50 m

BOA: 2.15 m

Weight: 1,475 lbs

Displacement: enough for 3 for a week of camping cruising

Fuel: 30 gal

Power: 60 hp Evinrude E-tec.

N I C E ! ! ! !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking boat. I like the stone cold stink eye stare in photo 1.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very very nice boat Koko! Modern sexy. Retro chic. Sensible. Useful. Quiet. Efficient. Self-designed. Homebuilt. Well finished. Fits a nesting PT11 (googled her name and saw PT’s photos). Can the 60hp cope with a skier? Do you have a huge smuggling hold under the cockpit sole?

You’re ticking a lot of boxes there and could be on the medal podium for this thread. (May I humbly offer that ski-able secures her Silver, and a carbon skinjob on that Evinrude would take the Gold?)

Willing to share any pics of the design? Any clues on her name?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, HFC Hunter said:

Can the 60hp cope with a skier?

Sure, just put it on a much smaller, lighter boat.

Real skiers go 40 knots. Wannabe old men like me ski at 35 knots.

That's a really cool boat Koko has built but it's not a ski boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a skiboat, but still nice to ski some mornings when it’s oh so glassy...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just before the frenchtoast is made...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, HFC Hunter said:

Not a skiboat, but still nice to ski some mornings when it’s oh so glassy...

Cutting up glass in the morning is one of my favorite things, but only if I'm going the right speed on a good ski.

My parents had an old fashioned slalom about the size of a surfboard, which could probably be used behind Koko's boat. I'm going to have to get a bit older to call that fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years back when I saw my optometrist, he had one leg strapped to a little cart and maneuvered with some ski poles.  I asked what happened.

He said, "I completely blew out my knee. I should have got up on 2 and dropped".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Fat Point Jack said:

A few years back when I saw my optometrist, he had one leg strapped to a little cart and maneuvered with some ski poles.  I asked what happened.

He said, "I completely blew out my knee. I should have got up on 2 and dropped".

I never learned to do that and I'm probably too old to learn new tricks.

How do you like the Etec, Koko? I looked hard at it when we bought our 60 hp Tohonda a few years ago. First scheduled maintenance in five years was pretty appealing. How long have you had it and how many hours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I never learned to do that and I'm probably too old to learn new tricks.

How do you like the Etec, Koko? I looked hard at it when we bought our 60 hp Tohonda a few years ago. First scheduled maintenance in five years was pretty appealing. How long have you had it and how many hours?

Good question ..i am considering the same issue...etec or Tohatsu 

those Tohatsu  2 stroke motors are very popular in the commercial sector  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the compliments.  

Regarding some of the questions:

She is designed to run efficiently on the least amount of power and cruise at 15-20 kn comfortably.  That is almost mutually exclusive with going skiing.  My daughter and her friends tube behind us, but skiing would not be that exciting.

We designed her with the E-tec in mind.  Its my 2nd E-tec, and I believe the in-line 2 cylinder motors are the best motors up to 60 hp you can buy.  Syhoja has about 350 hrs on her and we have never had an issue. Never.  I have no problem taking her up to Princes Louisa inlet, the upper reaches of Toba Inlet, or up Johnstone Straight.  I am diligent about in-line water separators, fuel treatment, and maintenance, though besides a new set of plugs, fuel filter and lower gear oil she has needed nothing. And at 0.5L/nm at 16kn I can't complain.

There is plenty of storage on board.  We hold a 30 gal fuel tank under the cockpit floor, and have similar sized lazarette just aft of the fuel tank below the cockpit. There are additional lockers either side of the motor, and below the cockpit seats.

Here is a link with more info: http://ptwatercraft.com/blog/?p=1257

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kokopelli said:

Thanks for all the compliments.  

Regarding some of the questions:

She is designed to run efficiently on the least amount of power and cruise at 15-20 kn comfortably.  That is almost mutually exclusive with going skiing.  My daughter and her friends tube behind us, but skiing would not be that exciting.

We designed her with the E-tec in mind.  Its my 2nd E-tec, and I believe the in-line 2 cylinder motors are the best motors up to 60 hp you can buy.  Syhoja has about 350 hrs on her and we have never had an issue. Never.  I have no problem taking her up to Princes Louisa inlet, the upper reaches of Toba Inlet, or up Johnstone Straight.  I am diligent about in-line water separators, fuel treatment, and maintenance, though besides a new set of plugs, fuel filter and lower gear oil she has needed nothing. And at 0.5L/nm at 16kn I can't complain.

There is plenty of storage on board.  We hold a 30 gal fuel tank under the cockpit floor, and have similar sized lazarette just aft of the fuel tank below the cockpit. There are additional lockers either side of the motor, and below the cockpit seats.

Here is a link with more info: http://ptwatercraft.com/blog/?p=1257

 

Lovely vessel, I could really go for something like that!!  I clicked on your link, but did not find your beautiful boats design?  Are you involved with that group?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy frijoles Koko, she's a beauty!

It looks like the cabin top is strip planked. The foredeck is stunning; what is it made of?

Do you have more photos of the interior? How about pics of the construction?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you scroll down a bit on this link you will see the back story on SYHOJA.  http://ptwatercraft.com/blog/?p=1257

There is a short video and some further shots of the cockpit and the cabin.

The entire deck and hull are strip planked core in WR cedar laminated over with either carbon or uni glass across the grain, below the chine she is 9mm ply with 9 oz glass on the outside, and 5 oz kevlar/4 oz glass on the inside, and all bulkheads and interior are Nidacore composite.  I was lucky to have Russell Brown and his patience to bounce ideas off, and to give me insights on the lightest and strongest layup.  He even put me in touch with Burt Rutan to get the specialty uni glass cloth we used inside the hull sides to finish them clear and show off the wood.

Its sunny in Seattle this PM so I took her out for a spin on Lake Washington.  It never gets old!

Here she is somewhere up north.

syhoja mt buckner small.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, slug zitski said:
13 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I never learned to do that and I'm probably too old to learn new tricks.

How do you like the Etec, Koko? I looked hard at it when we bought our 60 hp Tohonda a few years ago. First scheduled maintenance in five years was pretty appealing. How long have you had it and how many hours?

Good question ..i am considering the same issue...etec or Tohatsu 

those Tohatsu  2 stroke motors are very popular in the commercial sector  

Thanks for the feedback, Koko.

Slug, not sure if you're aware, but if it's 50 hp or less, even if it has silver paint, it's a Tohatsu inside. If it's 60 hp or more, even if it has midnight blue paint, it's a Honda inside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

My wife and I have a rental house in Anacortes that we'd eventually like to use as a base for cruising in the PNW and B.C.  This has caught my eye, at least for shorter trips.  For ore extended cruising, I'd want to talk to the Maestro about a shower stall, hot water, and a swim step with dinghy davits.  These, however, would reduce the functionality of the boat as a commuter.  The last thing I'd want to do is screw up a piece of Bob's artwork.

http://hunterbaywoodworking.com/gallery_evalena.php

To me, this boat looks like nice furniture with a water view.  I know it's for sale, but one of my two other boats would have to go (says the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who is the rational one between the two of us) which is a hard task in an island state where no one wants a boat or has a place to keep it.  We were in Seattle over President's Day weekend and tried to find Evalena over on East Lake Ave- where it appears to be moored in the photos.  It was too damn cold to get out and walk, and we never spotted her from the road.  Still, she has kind of a siren call to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She is moored at a private floating home community. Hard to see from the road. I have been aboard and she is very nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:Thanks for the feedback, Koko.

Slug, not sure if you're aware, but if it's 50 hp or less, even if it has silver paint, it's a Tohatsu inside. If it's 60 hp or more, even if it has midnight blue paint, it's a Honda inside.

Yah..they are the biggest producer of  small outboards.

 

i just dont have any experience with TLDI or Etec 

the price and power to weght ratio of  the TLDI looks good at 50hp

this would be a  utility skiff engine 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Etec in one word, awesome. I have mates with them and have driven their boats a lot. Quiet, economical, reliable, tick every box. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Alcatraz5768 said:

Etec in one word, awesome. I have mates with them and have driven their boats a lot. Quiet, economical, reliable, tick every box. 

That what ive been told...good motors.

but...they are heavy in the 50 hp range 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, probably the only drawback. I have a thundercat with a pull start short shaft tiller steer yammy that is way lighter, but it needs to be on that boat. If I had a boat that could cope with more weight I would have an etec in a heartbeat. 

What boat do you have?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Yah..they are the biggest producer of  small outboards.

 

i just dont have any experience with TLDI or Etec 

the price and power to weght ratio of  the TLDI looks good at 50hp

this would be a  utility skiff engine 

When I worked at the dealership we were putting those TLDI engines on MacGregors. Yeah, I know, the boat is against everyone's religion here. I'm talking about the motor. They were fine engines. We never had one come in for warranty work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Alcatraz5768 said:

Yep, probably the only drawback. I have a thundercat with a pull start short shaft tiller steer yammy that is way lighter, but it needs to be on that boat. If I had a boat that could cope with more weight I would have an etec in a heartbeat. 

What boat do you have?

I was recently told that the benefit of an e-tec is that they're way lighter than a four stroke, or are you comparing them to other small two strokes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 60 hp Etec with PTT and remote controls is 240 lbs, which is comparable, or just slightly lighter than 4 stroke motors.  Where the Etec differs is in the higher low end torque and fuel efficiency at cruising speeds.  I spin a big 3-bladed stainless Viper prop at 13 7/8 x 17".  No other 60 hp 4 stroke will spin that size prop.  However, at WOT they all use a similar amount of fuel.

I think the Etec advantage is in the smaller engines, once you are in the big hp there are lots of good choices.  It all depends what power delivery your hull likes and how you use your boat. Matching hull to motor is not easy.  We designed SYHOJA from the beginning with the Etec in mind.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just looked at the 40 specs and they are heavier than the Honda 4 stroke 40’s.   

I was always getting the Honda 40’s as they have the NMEA connection but if the etec’s are 2 stroke but heavier than the 4 strokes, what is the attraction?

the longer maintenance periods sound nice though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, kokopelli said:

My 60 hp Etec with PTT and remote controls is 240 lbs, which is comparable, or just slightly lighter than 4 stroke motors.  Where the Etec differs is in the higher low end torque and fuel efficiency at cruising speeds.  I spin a big 3-bladed stainless Viper prop at 13 7/8 x 17".  No other 60 hp 4 stroke will spin that size prop.  However, at WOT they all use a similar amount of fuel.

I think the Etec advantage is in the smaller engines, once you are in the big hp there are lots of good choices.  It all depends what power delivery your hull likes and how you use your boat. Matching hull to motor is not easy.  We designed SYHOJA from the beginning with the Etec in mind.

Well that answers some of my questions too.  Thanks.

 

beautiful boat by the way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Honda just came out with a new 40.  Honda used to use the same motor for 40-60 hp engines, just like the Etec, but heavier.  When I bought my 60 hp in 2012 it was the lightest of the bunch.  However, the midrange on the 40 Etec is unbelievable, they only neutered the top end to get it down to 40 hp.

To me the attraction was minimal maintenance, more torque - larger prop, less fuel at cruising speed, same or less weight in the 60 hp class.

I am not a total Etec cheerleader.  Only in the smaller motors.  At 150 hp I'd own the Yami F150, above that I would choose a v-tec Honda V-6.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The new gen 2 etec big engines, the horrible red ones, have amazing features. Surpass any four stroke at the moment. 

Dont get me wrong, I like them, but I still like my old style 2 stroke better. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kokopelli said:

My 60 hp Etec with PTT and remote controls is 240 lbs, which is comparable, or just slightly lighter than 4 stroke motors.  Where the Etec differs is in the higher low end torque and fuel efficiency at cruising speeds.  I spin a big 3-bladed stainless Viper prop at 13 7/8 x 17".  No other 60 hp 4 stroke will spin that size prop.  However, at WOT they all use a similar amount of fuel.

I think the Etec advantage is in the smaller engines, once you are in the big hp there are lots of good choices.  It all depends what power delivery your hull likes and how you use your boat. Matching hull to motor is not easy.  We designed SYHOJA from the beginning with the Etec in mind.

Lots of good info, thank you.  I just picked up a 1992 Mako 241 and it has original Yamaha twin 150hp motors. I'm keen to see how they run for a few years but I'll repower soon, partially for the quiet operation. My brothers want us to look at the E-tec in either 150 or 200 or the Yamahas in the same.

 

IMG_5396.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, WCB said:

Lots of good info, thank you.  I just picked up a 1992 Mako 241 and it has original Yamaha twin 150hp motors. I'm keen to see how they run for a few years but I'll repower soon, partially for the quiet operation. My brothers want us to look at the E-tec in either 150 or 200 or the Yamahas in the same.

 

IMG_5396.JPG

 

Great boat!!  Had that very model, but with single Yamaha 225.  Handles rough water like a dream, and very dry with flared high forward section. Mine had a 140 gallon tank and no T-top, canvas instead.  It was great for just cruising, fishing and tubing or water skiing the kids and their friends.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Great boat!!  Had that very model, but with single Yamaha 225.  Handles rough water like a dream, and very dry with flared high forward section. Mine had a 140 gallon tank and no T-top, canvas instead.  It was great for just cruising, fishing and tubing or water skiing the kids and their friends.

Glad to hear it, Billy. First ride for me should be mid-May when I'm in Mass/RI for my mother's 75th. I'm planning to take it down to Newport from the Fall River area where it's getting some new cushions done. I used to use a 22' when teaching sailing on Cape Cod but have not been in a 24 before. Fuel tank is 185 gallons in this model. 

It's a family toy with lots of kids between 2mos and 17year in our family.  Get the kids out on the water.  All of our sailboats at the moment are racers so not ideal for family. Should be nice for trips to MV and Tarpaulin Cove....etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, WCB said:

It's a family toy with lots of kids between 2mos and 17year in our family.  Get the kids out on the water.  All of our sailboats at the moment are racers so not ideal for family. Should be nice for trips to MV and Tarpaulin Cove....etc.

 

Daughters are grown now, but when they were young, we would go up the CT River to Hamburg Cove, nearly every nice weekend in the summer, and raft up with a bunch of friends.  When the younger one finished High School and off to College down south, we didn't use it nearly as much, so after a couple years like that, we sold to a guy with a house one a big lake, up in New Hampshire.   Instead of the stinky chemical toilet, we used a 5 gallon plastic with a roto-molded toilet seat that snapped right in, and canvas included a privacy  curtain that fastened  the back of the bow dodger.  I would trust that boat in the nastiest weather, solid, stable platform.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Daughters are grown now, but when they were young, we would go up the CT River to Hamburg Cove, nearly every nice weekend in the summer, and raft up with a bunch of friends.  When the younger one finished High School and off to College down south, we didn't use it nearly as much, so after a couple years like that, we sold to a guy with a house one a big lake, up in New Hampshire.   Instead of the stinky chemical toilet, we used a 5 gallon plastic with a roto-molded toilet seat that snapped right in, and canvas included a privacy  curtain that fastened  the back of the bow dodger.  I would trust that boat in the nastiest weather, solid, stable platform.

Very encouraging to hear...thanks again.  That ticks all of the boxes for us.  We didn't have any plans for a dodger with privacy curtain but maybe that has to be on the list since this isn't a step down center console with head.  I kind of figured we could chuck the kids overboard and they could use the ocean.  

The raft ups are on the list of to-dos.  My buddy has a Striper walk around in North Falmouth so we have plans to meet up in Hadley's Harbor for the kids to play and jump off of the boats...etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kokopelli,  On a scale of 1 to 10 your boat design and build quality is a 12. I'll bet Russell gives it a big thumbs-up.

 

45 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 I would trust that boat in the nastiest weather, solid, stable platform.

 

This tub lacks in speed but is a trusty steed.

IMG_0051 (3).jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, WCB said:

The raft ups are on the list of to-dos.  My buddy has a Striper walk around in North Falmouth so we have plans to meet up in Hadley's Harbor for the kids to play and jump off of the boats...etc.

 

Spent the night in Hadley's, prior to some race, back in the early 80's, on the 65' IOR boat that I was Boat Nanny on.  Woke up very early to some crew who lived nearby, arriving in a 15' Boston  Whaler.  I was seriously hungover, or maybe (probably!) still a little drunk, from the Cocktail party the night before, at some YC there, don't recall which one.  I noticed the whaler had water skis on board, and I fancied a brisk, chilly, early morning ski-bracer to shake out the cobwebs.  There was no tow rope, so I used one of our 5/8" Kevlar "light" spin sheets, duct taped to the removable SS Lewmar hydraulic handle, that pumped up the backstay cylinder.  I tied, or duck taped an empty plastic gallon milk jug as a float, so the SS handle would not sink. The local, Bruce, N. who was driving his boat took me for a few spins, around the Harbor, and I was cured!!  Hangover and cobwebs all gone!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, olsurfer said:

Kokopelli,  On a scale of 1 to 10 your boat design and build quality is a 12. I'll bet Russell gives it a big thumbs-up.

 

 

This tub lacks in speed but is a trusty steed.

IMG_0051 (3).jpg

I've been aboard that boat. it's super cool. About as fuel efficient as it gets, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I've been aboard that boat. it's super cool. About as fuel efficient as it gets, I think.

Looks like a bitch to row.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should she be: PowerSailer or SailerPower?

That is the question.

In case you cannot choose.

In case you cannot make up your mind.

In case it is all confusing.

Simply go with the flow. It is all about to be on the water after all.

 

934Plview.jpg

934sailplan.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the rendering look like in a steep 4'-6' chop?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, IStream said:

What's the rendering look like in a steep 4'-6' chop?

They will have to ditch the tux for a "formal" dry suit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, olsurfer said:

They will have to ditch the tux for a "formal" dry suit!

Sooo... by adding the massive complexity of foils and a series (!?!) hybrid drivetrain, they've managed to create a carbon fiber 640hp 32' boat that goes 40kts and uses "20% less fuel" than the competition.  This one looks like it should have been halted based on back-of-the-envelope calculations.  

I'd bet you can find plenty of 32' 640hp boats that can do 40kts and use "20% less fuel" and don't use foils or hybrid drivetrains.  This thing just seems dumb.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are certainly some contradictions there!   I can’t imagine it would need anything like 600hp!!   And I’m sure it would do more than 40kts without the foils and 600hp.

if that is true and it is carbon, the drive train must be ridiculously heavy.

Sharp Tux’s though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Should she be: PowerSailer or SailerPower?

That is the question.

In case you cannot choose.

In case you cannot make up your mind.

In case it is all confusing.

Simply go with the flow. It is all about to be on the water after all.

 

934Plview.jpg

934sailplan.jpg

 

Mr. Tanton, That is a very interesting design!  Can you educate me please, as to why the mast is raked aft, and the spreaders swept forward?  And is that an outdrive, like the Inboard-Outdrive units found on power boats?  Thanks in advance!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • The foiling power boat got me thinking of the 'flying dolphin' ferries that have been plying their trade in the Greek Islands for decades. Back of the napkin says that speed/comfort/payload/fuel/range works out roughly.  

If your lucky enough to have to get to your boat somewhere in the Greek Islands, how'bout these for 'sailors power boat'. Check this old promo...it made me chuckle...

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IStream said:

What's the rendering look like in a steep 4'-6' chop?

Something like this I would imagine

Image result for speedboat crash

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Billy Backstay.

Thank you. The easiest way to answer your questions about the rig and sailplan is within an article I wrote about a previous model. On page one, lower right.

Yes, the inboard, outboard engine has been chosen for this hybrid boat. Some say, the most popular configuration for many, many power boats.

By the way, our Bob reviewed the Daysailer many moons ago in Sailing Magazine.

 

 

896art1.jpg

896art2.jpg

896Breeze.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ishmael.

Thank you. In both cases the sheer line in profile is actually a straight line from bow to stern. 

896pic1-AT30-16.jpg

896p1.jpg

896p2.gif

896p3.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Ishmael.

Thank you. In both cases the sheer line in profile is actually a straight line from bow to stern. 

896pic1-AT30-16.jpg

896p1.jpg

896p2.gif

896p3.JPG

I guess that's about as planar a sheer as you can get.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/9/2018 at 4:37 PM, Tanton Y_M said:

Ishmael.

Thank you. In both cases the sheer line in profile is actually a straight line from bow to stern. 

896pic1-AT30-16.jpg

896p1.jpg

896p2.gif

896p3.JPG

I always enjoy seeing your design out sailing when I am in Newport.

 

As for sailor's powerboats, maybe this?  Haha.
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

     I had a bizarre little 10' dinghy that I inherited in the VI. It was originally and British made RIB called a FLATACRAFT. It had caught fire and burned the tubes off an a crazy guy in Red Hook bought the charred hard bottom for $10. He glassed 8" high plywood sides to it and it had a sort of pram bow to begin with. It was very minimal and had just enough freeboard to support a 15 HP Yamaha 2 stroke and any one person crazy enough to drive it. It was sort of like doing a waterstart on a shortboard windsurfer. The Red Hook guy would sit at HorseFeathers bar at happy hour and wait til he heard the St John Ferry blow the last horn before departure. He would grab a 'go cup' fresh drink and run to his dink and head out to follow the big ferry boat. He would pull up behind just as the ferry was getting up on a plane and he would catch the wake like a wakesurfer. As the ferry got up to top speed (25 knots or so) he would start doing slalom ski moves back and forth out of the wake and well out from the centerline and then cut hard back towards the highest part of the rooster tail that the ferry would throw. He could jump that and get maybe 10 foot of air and then land on the face of the wake on the other side and do another laid over slalom style turn back for another jump. At first the ferry drivers went nuts and hated that the 'crazy white boy' was getting a free ride and would do their best to shake him off their tail. I was on the ferry one day and the skipper came back to the aft helm controls and chopped the throttles and the dinghy doofus almost ran into the transom.  The ferry skipper cussed him out in the finest Island style but the dinghy guy just gunned his little craft and headed to meet the ferry coming the other way from St John and did his antics on their wake on the approach to Red Hook. That mean't he got about a five minute ride each way for the 3:00, 4:00 and 5:00 ferries and was back at the bar for a fresh cocktail after a 10 minute thrill ride. The passengers on the ferries loved watching him and the skippers finally realized that he only tormented the fastest ferry boats and it sort of became an endorsement of their boats if he used them for his jollies. I think that the guy ended up getting killed in a photo airplane crash over at Sail Rock a couple of years later. The dink sat in the mangroves until I commandeered it and put my outboard on it and started using it to get out to the cloud breaks on the North Shore on the big winter swells.

    Johnson Reef was a long paddle out and my little surf shuttle worked out great. One particularly clean swell just kept getting better all day and I had just about surfed myself out and paddled to the dink anchored in the channel and climbed in and had a snack and a cold beer. I watched set after set come peeling in perfectly and caught my second wind and paddled back into the lineup for a second session. An hour later another rest and back out for a third session. It was like the wave was teasing me with further perfection and I finally tied my board leash to the anchor that the dink had been riding on and I stowed what little gear I had in the dink and fired up the trusty Yamaha and started dropping in on the shoulders of the peak and found that the pram bow wouldn't pearl if I was careful and pretty soon I was doing drops and laid over bottom turns right under the peak and then had a long left to play with. That wave had a wrap around bowl section at the end and I soon was doing cutbacks and floaters with ease! Plenty of speed to outrun sections and blast back out jumping waves after kicking out. My confidence in the boat grew and I had one of the best days on the water in my life. The surfers had long since left but watched from the beach and a couple of windsurf wave surfers were still out but the wind had dropped and they were getting caught inside. I did a few rescues but soon had the break all to myself. I only stopped when I saw that I was nearly out of fuel. This was long before Jet Skis became common in the surf and I saw some photos that had been taken of me doing a floater with the lower unit of the motor just following the wave lip slicing it into spray and lace! The photographer sent that photo to Yamaha (the logo on the motor cover was plainly visible) in the hopes they would pay for the photo as a promotional thing. Their reply was that they did not want to encourage such irresponsible use of their equipment! 

    I got about three more big swells that winter in the dink after I had lined the bottom and sides with those dense PU swim mats for cushioning (and positive floatation) and a set of footstraps that I could wedge myself into the boat securely on jumps that had to have been over 15' high at times. The motor never failed me except it would get fuel starved from the G-forces in some of the long drawn out bottom turns and I thankfully never got worked by the notoriously nasty Johnson Reef wave and coral bottom. What that guy is doing with the big twin engined rib in the video is pretty mild compared.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great crazy water-man story! I'm still trying to visualize doin a floater in a boat!!!!!! When you dropped in, could you fade your bottom turn out into the flat, same as on some rhino chaser pintail?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

     I don't know if you ever saw Johnson's Reef break but it was a lot like Teahupoo only smaller. It could hold its size pretty well and had a really deep channel that I could anchor safely in. Usually sat out in the tradewinds and was too choppy for paddle in but that made it good for wavesailing except the shoulder was upwind and the reef was really shallow and would suck dry. I broke more that a couple of windsurfer skegs and even clipped a couple times with the outboard lower unit. The surf isn't consistent enough to keep the elkhorn beat down like in Hawaii and there might be three feet of water over the hard boilerplate reef but there would be three feet of razor sharp elkhorn reaching up almost to the surface. The wave face wasn't as square as Teahupoo (where is it other than maybe Ships Sterns?) and I could drop down far enough on the dink to keep from getting nailed by the lip and then had some slope left to draw out a big hard power assist turn and project way down the line. I could rebound off the lip to a floater or even pull up under the lip and take a high tight line out to the bowl at the end. I never got very comfortable surfing that wave on a board and spent more time on a windsurfer there until the dink showed up. With its pram bow and a pretty good V with running strakes I never spun out in it as long as I kept some gas on that made the lower unit work as a skeg. If you chopped power it would get squirrley and I did get pushed sideways like the boat in that video until I learned to keep turning back down. The shape and proportions of the dink made it sort of like a Fish surfboard, keep quick turns and up on an edge. I had another RIB rescue hardbottom that the tubes got eaten by a hurricane and I added plywood sides. At 12' I tried in on the next really big swell but it had too much fore foot which would dig in if you dropped too far down a steep face and I did get hosed pretty good a couple times on it and swamped and washed over the inside reef so stuck with the ugly little Flatacraft mongrel for hard core surfing.

    Amazing but I found some photos online of the Flatacraft donor dinghy. Note the pram bow and imagine losing the draggy tubes and the hard chine that the added sheet ply sides formed. Limbo Dean from Foxy's stole the surf dink off the beach where it was awaiting some rebuild of the bottom which I had based out on my kickout jumps in the surf. He stole a motor from another dink and put it on the surf dink and was seen leaving in the wee hours of the morning for Jost and I really hoped it would sink halfway with him. Apparently not as I found it in the back of hid Dad's bar a couple of years later, still with cracks in the bottom.

Image result for flatacraft

Image result for flatacraft

I'd buy another and recreate the surf dink if I ever run across one! Maybe I'll draw one up in Rhino and get it kitted for stitch and glue.

Image result for flatacraft

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Billy Backstay.

Thank you. The easiest way to answer your questions about the rig and sailplan is within an article I wrote about a previous model. On page one, lower right.

Yes, the inboard, outboard engine has been chosen for this hybrid boat. Some say, the most popular configuration for many, many power boats.

By the way, our Bob reviewed the Daysailer many moons ago in Sailing Magazine.

 

 

896art1.jpg

896art2.jpg

896Breeze.jpg

 

Thanks for the article; monsieur Tanton!!  Very unique and interesting vessel!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank billy backstay; fast yacht.

The 100K boat to ROI 3.7 Million over 20 years.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/15/2018 at 2:50 PM, t_huebs said:

Glad folks are talking about Irens' Rangeboats here, the LDL concept is a good one for efficient cruisers.  There was one with a Nanni hybrid/diesel powertrain a bit ago.  I just hope I can still get my hands on one when I can afford one.

In the meantime, this is the current ride, mainly used for cocktailing and taking pictures of sailboats:seaway.thumb.jpg.0a1e7763eade663e41a075bf1cf19e8c.jpg

 

Seaway Seafarer, 115HP Suzuki 4 stroke so you can get up and go, or idle around almost silently.

Seaway is now owned by Eastern who also builds the Sisu 22.

Unfortunately, I have to move halfway around the world shortly so she's gotta go.  Yeah yeah, buy an ad.  I will in the near future.  If you can't tell from the background and/or registration.  Newport, RI.

1

Allow myself to quote myself...

Ad for this is up on craigslist:

https://providence.craigslist.org/boa/d/21-seaway-seafarer/6548459964.html

Before anyone gets up in arms, I just bought an ad for a sailboat here at SA so I'm claiming that as good enough as nobody comes to SA to browse ads for powerboats.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No cockpit or cabin pics almost qualifies you for the "Mocking Ads" thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aside from plans changing after I shrunk the boat for the winter that'd be easy.  It actually serves as a useful filter and I can fire a link to a google drive trove of pics if they email me and it's not fully bonkers.

We could start another thread with best emails you get selling stuff on CL, got this one recently:

"Thank you for getting back to me. Can you assure me that it is in good state and that i will not be disappointed with it? I'm ready to pay your asking price, but the issue is I'm a Marine Officer and I'm not in my own state now, I'm on a secret mission in  Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany GA and  use of mobile phone is currently restricted at the military base, But I'm able to access email anytime as we will make use of laptop so my only quickest payment option is PayPal as i can send money via PayPal anytime.Since I'm requesting this transaction to be done via PayPal. SEMPER FI"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, t_huebs said:

Aside from plans changing after I shrunk the boat for the winter that'd be easy.  It actually serves as a useful filter and I can fire a link to a google drive trove of pics if they email me and it's not fully bonkers.

We could start another thread with best emails you get selling stuff on CL, got this one recently:

"Thank you for getting back to me. Can you assure me that it is in good state and that i will not be disappointed with it? I'm ready to pay your asking price, but the issue is I'm a Marine Officer and I'm not in my own state of mental acuity now, I'm on a secret mission in Nigeria for the Nigerian Marine Corps Logistics Base SA any and  use of mobile phone is currently restricted at the military base, Besides while I have been here for only a few weeks my English still has a central African accent. But I'm able to access email anytime as we (oh, did I mention my rich uncle who is also a Marine Officer?) will make use of laptop so my only quickest payment option is PayPal as i can send money via PayPal anytime.Since I'm requesting this transaction to be done via PayPal. SEMPER FI"

Just fillin' in the white spaces for ya...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, t_huebs said:

Aside from plans changing after I shrunk the boat for the winter that'd be easy.  It actually serves as a useful filter and I can fire a link to a google drive trove of pics if they email me and it's not fully bonkers.

 

Does 'shrunk the boat for the winter' mean shrink wrapping? If so both the mentality and the practice should be outlawed. Neither the boat, the worker or the environment wins. If I've misinterpreted, as you were.

Paying for a proper canvas cover from the outset is better for your boat, the worker and the environment. ....and I'm out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, fufkin said:

Does 'shrunk the boat for the winter' mean shrink wrapping?

Maybe he's patenting a new process.  It allows you to keep it in your toolbox and then when you toss it back in the water it expands.  Kind of like the foam dinosaurs.    

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those foiling Frenchies are so cute, I want one!!

(Spoken in little excited girly talk)

I’ll stick with Swan Boats

158E46AB-AC80-4126-8E19-D87C83B9C3F1.jpeg

30596513-4548-4B5D-88A1-8256D6B380A1.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surveyed this yesterday.  True North 38. Pretty cool boat with, err, unique looks.  Huge cockpit, swing open transom doors, nice galley, large head, sleeps four, horrible engine room.

 

IMG_1412.jpg

IMG_1417.jpg

Truenorthcockpit.jpg

IMG_1421.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2018 at 4:52 AM, widget said:

Maybe he's patenting a new process.  It allows you to keep it in your toolbox and then when you toss it back in the water it expands.  Kind of like the foam dinosaurs.    

Wasn’t it Odin who commissioned Skithbathnir from the Frost Giants?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Surveyed this yesterday.  True North 38. Pretty cool boat with, err, unique looks.  Huge cockpit, swing open transom doors, nice galley, large head, sleeps four, horrible engine room.

 

IMG_1412.jpg

IMG_1417.jpg

Truenorthcockpit.jpg

IMG_1421.jpg

 

Except for the extreme reverse transom, and horrible engine room, I like a LOT about that boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some pictures right before this years R2AK of Paul's 20' power outrigger next to Russell's G32. Cell phone pics so the quality is low.

PBOO2.jpg

PBOO1.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw this on Failbook today36582365_1642906805831870_510240684540690432_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&_nc_eui2=AeGLLzIdUfXsupJK7enUPLF-gxRLoWk-Cx4YQl4uiFtaUmK2T2OvswrC4JAzqHkEfWOOqWHJJl1MO-hUd1_9zjZxyBDd5PS8J9kIRhM8ppgzJQ&oh=3261e457d2d4837b3bf132484a813b01&oe=5BDC7C23

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, to be a sailors motor boat, it has to fit your circumstances (not what you think your circumstances should be)..

So my motor boat has to go under a 6ft 6in bridge, that's 700 years old so they won't be changing it..

I have to be able to sleep on it,... when you've been at the club bar, driving home  is not an option..

 There needs to be a toilet on board (see above)

It's has to be economical.... most often it does 0 yes Zero Mpg, that at up to 6mph which is the maximum speed limit in the area..

Why zero mpg? She's diesel electric with a stack of batteries and solar panels on the roof. So for the majority of trips the batteries do their stuff charged up by solar, only on a longer trips do I wind up the generator. Then it's about 2 pints an hour of diesel

 In keeping with economical she's now 49 years old, still in a bit of a mess, the electric conversion was 2 years ago, I have a lot of work still to do (new windows next)...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, The Q said:

Well, to be a sailors motor boat, it has to fit your circumstances (not what you think your circumstances should be)..

So my motor boat has to go under a 6ft 6in bridge, that's 700 years old so they won't be changing it..

I have to be able to sleep on it,... when you've been at the club bar, driving home  is not an option..

 There needs to be a toilet on board (see above)

It's has to be economical.... most often it does 0 yes Zero Mpg, that at up to 6mph which is the maximum speed limit in the area..

Why zero mpg? She's diesel electric with a stack of batteries and solar panels on the roof. So for the majority of trips the batteries do their stuff charged up by solar, only on a longer trips do I wind up the generator. Then it's about 2 pints an hour of diesel

 In keeping with economical she's now 49 years old, still in a bit of a mess, the electric conversion was 2 years ago, I have a lot of work still to do (new windows next)...

Please post picture of boat.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tim Kernan’s 48’ design said to be inspired by George Griffith’s Sarissa.

41A54D97-C15D-47CC-AB63-DEC90B5F7708.jpeg

AC8B7786-3699-4FEC-8AB2-9F9AA28F79EA.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've not got a photo to hand But Here.

http://www.jonesboatyard.co.uk/boat-sales/elysian-27-centre-cockpit-boats-for-sale.html

Are some photos of Similar boats. The Elysian 27ft, about 2500 aft cockpit were built and 300 centre cockpit. Most were for inland waterways in the UK, hence they were built with a 1.5Litre or 2 litre Diesel engine. There was a version with twin Volvos that could do 30knots...

They have been taken to sea, but I really wouldn't fancy that..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Q said:

i've not got a photo to hand But Here.

http://www.jonesboatyard.co.uk/boat-sales/elysian-27-centre-cockpit-boats-for-sale.html

Are some photos of Similar boats. The Elysian 27ft, about 2500 aft cockpit were built and 300 centre cockpit. Most were for inland waterways in the UK, hence they were built with a 1.5Litre or 2 litre Diesel engine. There was a version with twin Volvos that could do 30knots...

They have been taken to sea, but I really wouldn't fancy that..

Looks like a lot of boat in a small package, I like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, The Q said:

i've not got a photo to hand But Here.

http://www.jonesboatyard.co.uk/boat-sales/elysian-27-centre-cockpit-boats-for-sale.html

Are some photos of Similar boats. The Elysian 27ft, about 2500 aft cockpit were built and 300 centre cockpit. Most were for inland waterways in the UK, hence they were built with a 1.5Litre or 2 litre Diesel engine. There was a version with twin Volvos that could do 30knots...

They have been taken to sea, but I really wouldn't fancy that..

The brochure says it carries a whole 25 gallons of fuel. So it won't do 30 knots for very long at all is my guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

The brochure says it carries a whole 25 gallons of fuel. So it won't do 30 knots for very long at all is my guess.

The 25 gallons was in the 1500CC diesel / 2000CC Diesel version. The 30 Knot version had a very much larger tank. As it was most of those sold went into the hire fleets with the 25 Gallon tank and a top speed of 6 or 7 mph. The number of hire yards that can supply diesel has very much reduced and most boats have larger tanks now, mine is a 75 gallon tank. If the previous owner had wanted, there is probably space for a 100 Gallon tank.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Looks like a lot of boat in a small package, I like it.

Yes, mine was a very tight 5 berth (3 in the aft cabin), When I've finished the rebuild it will be 2 permanant berths in the forward cabin and two occasional berths in the aft cabin.

I see you've a set of pipes on your shoulder, so I'm guessing Scottish decent, There were some of these boats in the hire fleet on Loch Ness though they have been replaced by more modern boats now.. I went to school in Inverness, while my Parents were living in the Hebridies,..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2018 at 9:18 AM, Maroon said:

What are your choices for a sailors powerboat? Go..........................

Mine’s a Tiara. I get zero insults from the race crew when we sit on her after a regatta and cocktail. :lol:

AC90AF7B-27EA-4AE2-9F3B-5EE8F313296A.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They actually took that outdoors, put it in the water, and are letting it rub a piling like a normal boat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

They actually took that outdoors, put it in the water, and are letting it rub a piling like a normal boat?

 

Looks like they have fastened non-marking vertical fender material on the pilings, but real fenders with terry cloth covering are warranted here, for sure!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.png.fed8857d5a142eab3c7a5202d07dbf71.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 2:28 PM, billy backstay said:

 

Except for the extreme reverse transom, and horrible engine room, I like a LOT about that boat!

I looked at those before I picked up my Tiara. Reverse transom wastes a lot of room. That's what killed it for me...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites