Maroon

Sailors Powerboat

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Being owned by Mike Peters is pretty high praise for any boat and would have sealed the deal for me Kim. I'll have to look up a great article Mike wrote about how wake surfing boats are just bad design. He has turned down a few requests to design them. I don't see enough wake from Drumbeat to begin to wake surf.

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13 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Being owned by Mike Peters is pretty high praise for any boat and would have sealed the deal for me Kim. I'll have to look up a great article Mike wrote about how wake surfing boats are just bad design. He has turned down a few requests to design them. I don't see enough wake from Drumbeat to begin to wake surf.

Before I purchased her I had a very nice long phone conversation with Mike. He was very helpful and supportive, I have the manual he wrote for the boat which is also very helpful. The fact he owned the boat for ten years speaks volumes. I had been looking at powerboats for several years and when I first saw the listing on Yachtworld I jumped at this one. A sailor’s powerboat for sure and SWMBO is VERY happy with her design. Tim Kernan (with input from Mike) hit this one out of the park. (She has very little wake at 18 knots, reminds me of a Bob Perry designed sailboat I am quite familiar with....)

FFDA9220-CB7F-432F-860B-8034A78D6A00.jpeg

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   I had the pleasure of working with Mike for a year or so. He was the chief designer for Cigarette at the time and our little shipbuilding company in New Orleans (Halter Marine) bought CIgarette from Don Aronow. Mike was part of the deal and my S Cal roots an his having grown up on Catalina Island led to our friendship amongst the rednecks and coon-asses which were the norm at the Halter Marine Division. I learned a lot from Mike despite my job role as an interior joiner and he was the chief designer.

     You have a keeper in DRUMBEAT.

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2 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

   I had the pleasure of working with Mike for a year or so. He was the chief designer for Cigarette at the time and our little shipbuilding company in New Orleans (Halter Marine) bought CIgarette from Don Aronow. Mike was part of the deal and my S Cal roots an his having grown up on Catalina Island led to our friendship amongst the rednecks and coon-asses which were the norm at the Halter Marine Division. I learned a lot from Mike despite my job role as an interior joiner and he was the chief designer.

     You have a keeper in DRUMBEAT.

SWMBO renamed her to WHITECAP

D56470E1-1441-4CBE-B163-8E4A43822176.jpeg

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2 hours ago, kimbottles said:

And the current owner has owned a number of sailboats......

15DB6BB1-6037-4839-976B-8D98459AACEF.jpeg

Shape and colour scheme reminds me of German inshore waterpolice boats. 

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On ‎7‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 2:23 PM, Innocent Bystander said:

Saw one of those in person a few years back.  Great looking build but really a 33' boat with a stern platform that is enclosed by the reverse transom and transom doors.  The transom looked out of place.  

Catalina Yachts just purchased True North.

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23 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Before I purchased her I had a very nice long phone conversation with Mike. He was very helpful and supportive, I have the manual he wrote for the boat which is also very helpful. The fact he owned the boat for ten years speaks volumes. I had been looking at powerboats for several years and when I first saw the listing on Yachtworld I jumped at this one. A sailor’s powerboat for sure and SWMBO is VERY happy with her design. Tim Kernan (with input from Mike) hit this one out of the park. (She has very little wake at 18 knots, reminds me of a Bob Perry designed sailboat I am quite familiar with....)

FFDA9220-CB7F-432F-860B-8034A78D6A00.jpeg

Peters owned the boat for less than five years and rarely had time to use her, attached is a story Peters wrote after the purchase. Great person easy to work with. 

image.png

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1 hour ago, Dude said:

Peters owned the boat for less than five years and rarely had time to use her, attached is a story Peters wrote after the purchase. Great person easy to work with. 

 

Coast Guard documentation records list his ownership ten times under the name ADELE, maybe I am reading their records wrong?

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3 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Coast Guard documentation records list his ownership ten times under the name ADELE, maybe I am reading their records wrong?

A great choice she has always been a favorite of mine, she is one of those boats that should stay in perpetuity with your family. Very glad to hear you were the lucky one to purchase her. The original owner will be very pleased.

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Same thing in a Windsorcraft 40 but became Vicem Yachts. Longtime friend now in New York that had use to race his Yammy 36.

Noice!

windsorcraft40ht_still.jpg

windsorcraft40ht_wheelhouse.jpg

windsorcraft40ht_master.jpg

windsorcraft40ht_flat.jpg

windsorcraft40ht_helm.jpg

windsorcraft40ht_head.jpg

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2 hours ago, VWAP said:

 

Interestingly, they may be quite unaware of just how perilously close they are to capsizing and flooding that cute little 2 hp.
Between the very large free surface and the ridilulously low freeboard, it wouldn't take much of a wave to roll them right over.

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37 minutes ago, maarten said:

20160724_111600.jpg

Two observatins.

1. Why is he brushing his teeth?

2. Is that boat really that light and skinny that it trims nearly 6" by the head with one person on the foredeck?

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That's it. Sweet little boats. Lots of strings.

Van de Stadt Mini-Tonner IIRC. Built here and in Europe

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1 hour ago, spankoka said:

 

47 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

That's it. Sweet little boats. Lots of strings.

Van de Stadt Mini-Tonner IIRC. Built here and in Europe

Raced one for a while, fun especially for the folks who liked nonstop tweaking of things

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1 hour ago, spankoka said:

My buddy had one. Called "Magic Mushroom". Great boat, great quality. We were out cursing together on the log booms in Gambier Is. He brought some BC herbolgy so we smoked some down below and a little high at that point so he had chart light and we started to put up shadow puppets against the bulkhead. Having a gay old time. The SO came over from our boat as she couldn't figure out all the giggling! She came over on to the cockpit and just shaking her head. Too funny.

 

 

 

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I've noticed over the years that wives do that a lot. :D

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On 12/22/2019 at 7:27 PM, fastyacht said:

Two observatins.

1. Why is he brushing his teeth?

2. Is that boat really that light and skinny that it trims nearly 6" by the head with one person on the foredeck?

1-Thats my son after he crawled out of his bunk.

2-Sprinta Sport as correctly quoted. 4 ksb but a lovely boat. Lots if strings as said. Did a lot of singlehanded sailing with it. Very controllable, even in ,28-30 knots of wind.

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2 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

image.thumb.png.24ea9f30daa50b4c0aa69247213d7884.png

Fastyacht, I suspect you know the carburetors on the Hall Scott engines sounded like a toilet flushing when those PT Boats we charging along at those speeds....

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1 minute ago, kimbottles said:

Fastyacht, I suspect you know the carburetors on the Hall Scott engines sounded like a toilet flushing when those PT Boats we charging along at those speeds....

HAha I did not know that but thats a great thing to remember.

 

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1 hour ago, kimbottles said:

Nice vessel!!

Long & lean. I thought you would like it!

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14 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Fastyacht, I suspect you know the carburetors on the Hall Scott engines sounded like a toilet flushing when those PT Boats we charging along at those speeds....

I remember a quote about those things;

"You couldn't shoot gas out of a firehose as fast as she'd suck".

A fun ride until the shooting started and as long as Uncle Sam was paying the fuel bills.

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We had this Lake Boat built to be a fishing platform for our son Mikey and his GrandPa. A boat for Rainbow and her friends could go to the beach. And as a Committee Boat. 

29EE5BA4-B03A-44AE-9E97-089B6F9D6DD1.jpeg

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On 12/23/2019 at 8:24 PM, kimbottles said:

Fastyacht, I suspect you know the carburetors on the Hall Scott engines sounded like a toilet flushing when those PT Boats we charging along at those speeds....

Sorry, but the VAST majority of PT boats were powered by a trio of Packard 4M-2500 (later 5M-2500) supercharged, liquid-cooled, V-12 marine engines.  The engines burned high-octane, av gas and each 4M-2500 put out 1200 HP.  The 5M-2500 put out 1500 HP each.  And yes, they drank a lot of fuel. 

One test boat used two 2000 HP Allison engines and a third 550 HP Hall-Scott and one Motor Rescue Boat used by the Royal Navy used three, 900HP Hall-Scott engines.   

BTW, PT-73 was 78” long and launched by Higgins Industries of New Orleans in July 1942.

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10 hours ago, socalrider said:

This sailor's new powerboat:

image.thumb.png.d27a2ce741c6a90a4cc75b1441cb4cf6.png

Are you going to change the “interests” on your profile? That is... seriously nice.

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I think if I was to get another powerboat, it would be all electric. To make that work, a few things:

- very low drag. This requires very low weight (static displacement).

- very high stability (low amplitude AND low rate) around all axis: pitch, roll, and yaw. This requires active control.
- A peaceful pace that enables enjoying the scenery and socializing underway: not exceeding 20 knots, and really more like 10 knots, or even 6 knots in stunning places like Alaska.

Therefore, I think hydrofoils must be involved, even at low speeds (not necessarily always flying).

 

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What kind of range are you looking for between recharges?

 

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Range: 80 miles. That is a long way to go in a day.

A 100 KW Tesla pack at $50k (soon $10k) would easily provide that range at 7 knots for a light low tech 40 foot displacement hull.

To make solar work requires area. That area can be in free standing wing sails that rotate freely 360, and are left up always. A feathered wing is less windage than a shroud.

Image many simple short chord wings, not one big one with lots of articulation. Many with no flaps, only controllable angle of attack.

There is almost always apparent wind more than 10 degrees off the bow,  when solid wings will make plenty of lift to assist the motor, or regenerate using the motor. There is some wind for some time nearly every day.

With a breath of air and sails up, I get 7 knots at 700w.

Wings above, wings below.

The point isn’t to make noise, it’s to move luxuriously from place to place with minimal physical risk.

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I'm confused. Are we talking about a powerboat or a sailboat or an electric motorsailor?

Setting that question aside, solar's great for opportunistic load support but how are you going to get 100KW into the bank at the end of the day? Even a 50A dock connection will only give you 40KW overnight. Seems like 30-40KW ought to be the targeted daily propulsion budget given current dock infrastructure. Maybe you go with a 100KW bank to allow for skipping a day of recharging, to be made up by an extended dock stay. 

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1 hour ago, carcrash said:

very high stability (low amplitude AND low rate) around all axis: pitch, roll, and yaw. This requires active control.

A Seakeeper gyro would probably consume your entire energy budget by itself unfortunately.  And it would add a fair bit of weight, which makes underwater foils tougher.  

I *really* want electric to work on boats but it's really difficult if you want any real range under power, and you quickly start unearthing all sorts of other design challenges (e.g. long narrow sailboat-like hulls without sails/keels will roll like crazy).  For the ultimate efficiency, look for a really good sailing rig and light weight - an ULDB, with a kicker electric motor and minimal range (10-20nm).  This has its own set of constraints (expect to spend some time becalmed) but the upside is that you can find otherwise fully developed platforms (someone on this site has done this with an Olson 40) and actually have a workable boat for a reasonable $$.  

If I were single and childless, or wished to become so again, that's the path I would have taken!  

A fully electric powerboat really only makes sense for Duffy-like applications I think (harbor cruiser) and unfortunately I think it'll stay that way for a long time.  

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I think this is where a cat makes sense but it then has to be big to get the space of a 40’ Mono (although not if that mono was super skinny.

 

a gougeon 32 car would make a great test platform.  It would take a very small amount of energy to move at 7-10kts..

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

I'm confused. Are we talking about a powerboat or a sailboat or an electric motorsailor?

Setting that question aside, solar's great for opportunistic load support but how are you going to get 100KW into the bank at the end of the day? Even a 50A dock connection will only give you 40KW overnight. Seems like 30-40KW ought to be the targeted daily propulsion budget given current dock infrastructure. Maybe you go with a 100KW bank to allow for skipping a day of recharging, to be made up by an extended dock stay. 

Too late to edit, but that should've been KWh...

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8 hours ago, IStream said:

I'm confused. Are we talking about a powerboat or a sailboat or an electric motorsailor?

Setting that question aside, solar's great for opportunistic load support but how are you going to get 100KWh into the bank at the end of the day? Even a 50A dock connection will only give you 40KWh overnight. Seems like 30-40KWh ought to be the targeted daily propulsion budget given current dock infrastructure. Maybe you go with a 100KWh bank to allow for skipping a day of recharging, to be made up by an extended dock stay. 

Electric numbers are ridiculously shitty.

Torqeedo battery. 100 kWh. Mass: 835 kG Fast charge will degrade battery. Need to take 3.5 hrs to protect from damage.

Say running at 40 kW you get 2.5 hrs.

Diesel. 100 gallons = 340 kg approx. 20 hp/gal/hr.  = 14.92 kw / gal /hr so at 40 kW = 2.68 gal/hr so you get 37 hours of operation. With less than half the mass -- and it gets lighter as you run. And you can fill it all up in less than 30 minutes.

 

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7 hours ago, socalrider said:

A Seakeeper gyro would probably consume your entire energy budget by itself unfortunately.  And it would add a fair bit of weight, which makes underwater foils tougher.  

I *really* want electric to work on boats but it's really difficult if you want any real range under power, and you quickly start unearthing all sorts of other design challenges (e.g. long narrow sailboat-like hulls without sails/keels will roll like crazy).  For the ultimate efficiency, look for a really good sailing rig and light weight - an ULDB, with a kicker electric motor and minimal range (10-20nm).  This has its own set of constraints (expect to spend some time becalmed) but the upside is that you can find otherwise fully developed platforms (someone on this site has done this with an Olson 40) and actually have a workable boat for a reasonable $$.  

If I were single and childless, or wished to become so again, that's the path I would have taken!  

A fully electric powerboat really only makes sense for Duffy-like applications I think (harbor cruiser) and unfortunately I think it'll stay that way for a long time.  

Seakeeper 3 weighs all up with batteries and supporting structure over 600 lbs. Good for 35 foot moboat.

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3 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Electric numbers are ridiculously shitty.

Torqeedo battery. 100 kWh. Mass: 835 kG Fast charge will degrade battery. Need to take 3.5 hrs to protect from damage.

Say running at 40 kW you get 2.5 hrs.

Diesel. 100 gallons = 340 kg approx. 20 hp/gal/hr.  = 14.92 kw / gal /hr so at 40 kW = 2.68 gal/hr so you get 37 hours of operation. With less than half the mass -- and it gets lighter as you run. And you can fill it all up in less than 30 minutes.

 

As I have noted on other threads, I really wanted to build FRANCIS LEE with an electric motor, but after digging deeply into the matter I realized that electric boats are not really ready for prime time yet if you want to say motor from Seattle to Victoria. Hopefully battery technology will improve enough someday for it to make sense. I enjoyed the Torqeedo outboard on my 30 Square Metre Boat, but we never went more than 5-10 miles under power, and we did so slowly to save the charge.

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28 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Electric numbers are ridiculously shitty.

Torqeedo battery. 100 kWh. Mass: 835 kG Fast charge will degrade battery. Need to take 3.5 hrs to protect from damage.

Say running at 40 kW you get 2.5 hrs.

Diesel. 100 gallons = 340 kg approx. 20 hp/gal/hr.  = 14.92 kw / gal /hr so at 40 kW = 2.68 gal/hr so you get 37 hours of operation. With less than half the mass -- and it gets lighter as you run. And you can fill it all up in less than 30 minutes.

 

Yup. I'm not arguing that it's practical yet. The technology is ~50X less energy dense than hydrocarbon propulsion. For most sailboats, electric needs to get about 10X better than it currently is (pick your figure of merit: energy/mass, energy/volume, energy/$) to be practical. For a pure motorboat, it needs to be even better than that.

I'm actively electrifying clinical laboratory instrumention at work and my own domestic and road-going vehicle infrastructure at home. But boats and air travel are still a long ways off from practicality in anything but the edge cases.

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6 hours ago, nige said:

I think this is where a cat makes sense but it then has to be big to get the space of a 40’ Mono (although not if that mono was super skinny.

 

a gougeon 32 car would make a great test platform.  It would take a very small amount of energy to move at 7-10kts..

Mine's available to test motors anytime, Nige.

You have your F-25 going? Salish 200 race?

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Personally I really like Bob’s big ass super efficient power boat. But for me, I have an F85SR trimaran and an Axopar28AC. Both fast and efficient. Some days ( today) I use them both. Don’t know how to post photos. Sorry.

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NFW am I going to power until I need to be rolled onboard and then maybe just be taken to sea and tossed over the side.  Wait, with a sailboat I can be hoisted aboard in my chair and hung over the side and the halyard can be cut with a machete so as not to prolong the descent.  There, I said it!

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1979  Mako 25

and this

 

image.png.b2ba0dc6ebe869bf71d6bf4a33f3a118.png

 

the Mainship started off it's life as a gas boat. 2nd owner repowered with Detroit Diesels. at 1500 she does about 9kts and burns around 5gal/hr with the genset on running everything on the boat.

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On 6/7/2020 at 11:27 AM, socalrider said:

very high stability (low amplitude AND low rate) around all axis: pitch, roll, and yaw. This requires active control.

Except for dock space, you can do this more simply and passively with an ILAN-style boat. No foils to get mangled by logs and catch kelp.
http://www.nigelirens.com/boats/power-boats/ilan/

Basically a mini version of Adastra, can't find video in a seaway but there is this one, same concept:

 

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On 6/7/2020 at 9:52 PM, zenmasterfred said:

NFW am I going to power until I need to be rolled onboard and then maybe just be taken to sea and tossed over the side.  Wait, with a sailboat I can be hoisted aboard in my chair and hung over the side and the halyard can be cut with a machete so as not to prolong the descent.  There, I said it!

Sailboats and Motorboats go together well as a fleet provided you get the right ones......

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With a lot of sexy thought in for good measure.

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6 minutes ago, Tanton Y_M said:

kimbottles.

Sail and Power to the Max.

325GAP1-AL26-14.jpg

325GAP3-AL26-14.jpg

325PR.jpg

Wow. What's the OAL? I'm guessing 65'?

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Wow. What's the OAL? I'm guessing 65'?

There's a tender with a T-top in it's stern, no way it's 65'. I'd guess 100'-110'

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Looks 97’ to me.

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

With a lot of sexy thought in for good measure.

What's even remotely sexy about that monstrosity?

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How about the sheer line as it descends toward the stern, expansive flat clear decks, curved coamings and cabin faces reminiscent of Sparkman & Stephens and easily driven hull shape with a long waterline and narrow beam for starters?

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Istream;SP543;Sail4beer;Misbehavvin. 40M.  131FT.

More on my blog: Super yachtTrend. 

 

 

 

 

325listpr-my11-17.jpg

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Thanks, YMT. I guessed 12' on the tender and extrapolated from there. Must be closer to 24'.

Brings to mind another era and type of locomotion:

proxy-image?piurl=https%3A%2F%2Fi.pinimg.com%2Foriginals%2Fa7%2Fe8%2F89%2Fa7e8898a3796dbd740a65e2e4b8f6218.jpg&sp=1591751300T5e453d8599a1fcf00220be8e6a267f3489c6f63ade4bd33feafc3da3835eb8e4

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10 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

How about the sheer line as it descends toward the stern, expansive flat clear decks, curved coamings and cabin faces reminiscent of Sparkman & Stephens and easily driven hull shape with a long waterline and narrow beam for starters?

The sheer appears to be more like a straight line than a curve and the cabin looks like something from a small coaster grafted on top, ending up with the boom +5 meters above deck.

Flat deck and curved coamings? Colour me impressed.

Just another playtoy for the ultra rich.

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I didn’t say the sheer had any spring,  and it is a motor sailor so the boom can be that high. 
 

I like it. Nice work T.

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1 hour ago, mcc1151 said:

Take your pick. I like these Nimbus boats.

31_cabin_render.jpg

31_weekender.jpg

Not as classy as their older ones.

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On 6/9/2020 at 8:33 AM, kimbottles said:

Sailboats and Motorboats go together well as a fleet provided you get the right ones......

Agree. Life's too short for a shitty boat of any design. 

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Literally. But problem with vid is ZERO recognition of who actually designed her!

 

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23 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Literally. But problem with vid is ZERO recognition of who actually designed her!

 

Fast,

    You must have fast forwarded through the part where Mike Peters says very clearly that the new 35 featured in the video is 'a Bertram' based on classic Bertram 31. Isn't Ray Hunt recognised  as the designer of the Moppie line?  Are you implying that someone else 'actually' designed the 31?  Mike was a great choice by Bertram to revisit that design, I can't think of anyone more qualified and he is giving credit where credit is due in the video.

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2 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Fast,

    You must have fast forwarded through the part where Mike Peters says very clearly that the new 35 featured in the video is 'a Bertram' based on classic Bertram 31. Isn't Ray Hunt recognised  as the designer of the Moppie line?  Are you implying that someone else 'actually' designed the 31?  Mike was a great choice by Bertram to revisit that design, I can't think of anyone more qualified and he is giving credit where credit is due in the video.

In the beginning they are saying Dick Bertram designed her--which is not true. Dick saw one of Ray's boats and wanted one for the Miami Nassau race,

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Lyman-Morse gets it right on their webpage.

In 2015 we were contracted by Bertram Yachts to build prototypes of its initial designs for the Bertram 35, a new Michael Peters design based on Ray Hunt’s iconic Moppie, the original Bertram 31. It was a great honor and experience to be a part of the relaunch of this iconic brand and model.

Bertrams original marketing material is pretty misleading for not mentioning the 'stinkpotter' who inspired the 'sailor' and I see what you mean now. 

One sailor did something. He talked to the amazing stinkpot 's designer, another sailor. Two years later, the Bertram deep-V hull was born. And made history by taking the roughest MiamiNassau power race ever run. In record time.

     Pretty sleazy way to put it. Of course you and I know the Hunt legacy. Yeah, now that you mention it I would have like to have heard Mike say it for all to hear that the Bertram's were based on Hunt's Moppies. BTW, you would probably be surprised at just how many powerboats are out there (or not) that have hulls that Mike Peters drew with his name really being associated with them. Actually Mike probably there days just looks over his young CAD whizzes and they bring his ideas to life. Same as it ever was, right?

    And now for the rest of the story...

Bertram31.com - Devoted to the Bertram 31 boats around the world!



          C. Raymond Hunt - Designer of the Bertram 31   The Deep Vee:
  Ray Hunt's design legacy

 

By Steve Knauth

On a spring day in 1960, a 31 foot in-board roared out through Miami's Government Cut and careened into boating history.

It was a hasty morning for a test ride, but that's just what owner Dick Bertram wanted. The wind was "blowing out of the east at 22 knots and the seas were rough," he recalled. Looking at driver Sam Griffith through the spindrift, Bertram wondered what to expect from the boat with its radical bottom, a "deep-vee" designed by a quiet New England innovator named Ray Hunt.

Bertram was excited by the potential of the odd-looking hull - vee-shaped for its entire length with fore-and-aft strakes below a sharp chine. Hunt knew it ran faster and handled better than other boats in high seas. Now Bertram was about to find out for himself.

Griffith, the veteran racer, cut speed instinctively to take the first wave at about 25 knots. "After the third wave, Sam started smiling and eased forward the throttles," Bertram wrote later. Griffith spun Moppie around and headed downwind. Instead of yawing, "the boat held it's course as though it were on tracks. We opened the throttles and raced those following seas at 40 knots straight for the inlet."

In those first few moments, Bertram and Griffith became deep-vee believers.

Though hardly a household name, Hunt is the guy who made speed, stability and handling an everyday part of motorboating. Through the genius of his deep-vee design, this champion sailor changed the face of powerboating. The 24 degree deep-vee with lifting strakes remains a standard.

The deep-vee was just one of many achievements in the wide-ranging design career of Charles Raymond Hunt, a complex man with a quick mind, little affinity for business and no taste for fame. Among his creations are the classic Concordia yawl, the 12 Meter Easterner and the ubiquitous Boston Whaler.

"He was a genius, a real wizard who did things no one else had done," Griffins said.

Bertram was so impressed with Hunt and his deep-vee that he entered Moppie in the 1960 Miami-Nassau Race. The boat covered the rough, wind-whipped, 160 mile course in record time, averaging just about 20 knots. A third of the fleet couldn't even finish.

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15 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

 

I know Steve! (We have both sailed together on a Hunt design. Haha.) Glad you chose to quote him!

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Mike Peters designed SARISSA George Griffith’s breakthrough ULDB “Sailor’s Powerboat”.

So having Mike take C. Raymond Hunt’s concept forward means there is a lot of talent involved in this B-35.

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Michael Peters has his fingerprints on a lot of stuff lately. I think both a Hinckley project and another custom project in Maine right now as well.

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53 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Michael Peters has his fingerprints on a lot of stuff lately. I think both a Hinckley project and another custom project in Maine right now as well.

I worked with Michael Peters in New Orleans when Harold Halter (Halter Marine) had bought CIGARETTE for a short period. We had some good times together because I think that he and I were the only employees of that company that were not from Louisiana! He was raised in California on Catalina Island and I went to High School in Long Beach and San Diego so we had a lot in common. He learned his skills for boat design and building from 'just messing about with boats' like the Water Ray in 'Wind and the Willows' while attending the 'Alternative High School' in Catalina that his parents ran. 

    He did a couple of the Hinckley Picnic Yachts and is a very versatile guy. 

     Kim, here is an excerpt from Mike talking about how he came to do the SARISA for Griffith.

https://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/blogs/still-cruising-after-all-these-years

 

PLUMDUFF was my favorite design by Peters,

 

Admiral boats for sale in 98148 - Boat Trader

George owned a succession of sailboats, all of which served double duty for racing and extended family cruising. Members of the Cruising Club of America since the 1950s, his family owns an LA Yacht Club mooring at Howland’s Landing, on Catalina Island, about 15 miles up the coast from where my family ran a summer camp.  

 
 
In August of 1983 I received a letter from George: “Millie and I are thinking of a powerboat.” Life onboard open-cockpit sailboats had taken its toll apparently and they wanted more shelter and speed. But George hated powerboats. Instead, he envisioned a “sailor’s powerboat,” the very antithesis of a bloated dockside condominium that would embarrass him while moored alongside his racing buddies. What he had in mind was a light-displacement, narrow-beam powerboat about 45 feet overall. He didn’t want a slowpoke trawler, either. This man was used to going fast, and he wanted to cruise at 20 knots. Was I interested in designing the boat for him?
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Great stuff Rasp! Thanks.

 

Here he is (On left) aboard DRUMBEAT which he bought and renamed ADELE.

(Later renamed WHITECAP by my wife.)

AEB47CCE-5DC7-4E58-A65E-C9EEE3C3D062.jpeg

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1 minute ago, Rasputin22 said:

So Mike Peters bought a Tim Kernan designed powerboat? That is high praise for sure!

When Tim was asked to design an updated SARISSA he, being a smart guy, called Mike and asked to discuss the project. Apparently they got along well and when DRUMBEAT became available Mike bought her, later selling her to George Griffith’s son David who is identified as Mike’s best friend in college in that article.

(We later purchased her from David. Small world. Mike gave me the manual that he had written for her, it has been most helpful! Mike seems like a really nice guy.)

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We were talking about Wind in the Willows a couple days ago. "What animal are you?" I said, "Ratty." When I was in 1st or 2nd grade, maybe 3rd, I made ratty's gig--with a drawknife, the block of wood secured in the vice in the cellar. I still have it!

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I made an attempt at modelling a Bertram 20 for a guy who wanted a traditional half hull model made to grace his mantelpiece. I had always admired the Hunt design and had a go at it and was pretty pleased at the results. Here are some renderings of my rendition of the Bertram (Ray Hunt) 20.

J2.thumb.jpg.a93c65fb7f036152f9d3a692f70c4871.jpgJ1.thumb.jpg.befdfde6be291be7c7dd32c6a8825f14.jpgo14.thumb.png.ca1a5bf9e840950abdd66498e15d56f8.png

Screenshot_2.thumb.jpg.2ee179f6865768889689a6d66673d2a3.jpg

 

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Rasputin22,  That is awesome. My powerboat (offshore 48) has that deep vee and rides like a new Cadillac on a new highway.I would love a small boat like that.

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Both Hunt and Bertram were seriously talented sailors who loved ocean racing. So to me, they sort of define "sailor's powerboat" in a way. In a similar vein, Phil Rhodes defines motorsailer with authority. Being that he too was a talented racing sailor, who grew up teaching sailing on Buckeye Lake in Ohio, and went on to teach the young Olin Stephens the craft--the latter worked for Rhodes early on. There's a photo to prove it, somewhere.

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4 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

I worked with Michael Peters in New Orleans when Harold Halter (Halter Marine) had bought CIGARETTE for a short period. We had some good times together because I think that he and I were the only employees of that company that were not from Louisiana! He was raised in California on Catalina Island and I went to High School in Long Beach and San Diego so we had a lot in common. He learned his skills for boat design and building from 'just messing about with boats' like the Water Ray in 'Wind and the Willows' while attending the 'Alternative High School' in Catalina that his parents ran. 

    He did a couple of the Hinckley Picnic Yachts and is a very versatile guy. 

     Kim, here is an excerpt from Mike talking about how he came to do the SARISA for Griffith.

https://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/blogs/still-cruising-after-all-these-years

 

PLUMDUFF was my favorite design by Peters,

 

Admiral boats for sale in 98148 - Boat Trader

George owned a succession of sailboats, all of which served double duty for racing and extended family cruising. Members of the Cruising Club of America since the 1950s, his family owns an LA Yacht Club mooring at Howland’s Landing, on Catalina Island, about 15 miles up the coast from where my family ran a summer camp.  

 
 
In August of 1983 I received a letter from George: “Millie and I are thinking of a powerboat.” Life onboard open-cockpit sailboats had taken its toll apparently and they wanted more shelter and speed. But George hated powerboats. Instead, he envisioned a “sailor’s powerboat,” the very antithesis of a bloated dockside condominium that would embarrass him while moored alongside his racing buddies. What he had in mind was a light-displacement, narrow-beam powerboat about 45 feet overall. He didn’t want a slowpoke trawler, either. This man was used to going fast, and he wanted to cruise at 20 knots. Was I interested in designing the boat for him?

That plumfucker drags an 8 foot wake. Going past the Hadlock public dock that wake practically threw a 35' tri I was working on onto the dock. I put my back out getting it off.How can you like that gas guzzling shit?

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Okay, I might have been a bit over the top. Bad associations with that boat and it does throw an 8 foot wake.

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