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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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1 hour ago, Forestdawg said:

It is interesting that the two official pictures released by VS11 only show the relatively undamaged side of the boat. More advice from the lawyers, I suppose.

They would surely know (simply from reading this thread) that there are plenty of other photos in circulation thank to our Kiwi bros

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9 hours ago, Francis Vaughan said:

You can be sure the replacement is full cored laminate. There is no way you could recover the honeycomb and foam and create a bond to it.

I am a little suspicious that there is more than one component in the replacements. There is clear damage past the mid-line, but more interesting is the question of how they will manage the logistics and geometry of assembling the bow. The bow was created by adding the internal structure into the hull before the deck went on. It is going to be awfully tight trying to get the structure together with the deck in place. So they may be intending performing the repair in sections. I just hope they do show how they go about it. 

Francis,

   No way would I try to bond to old core material, but it could be removed and replaced insitu. Not ideal by any means, and the only reason I suggested it is as you say, they have only shown us the port replacement section when there is clearly damage to the starboard side as well. However, looking at the photos again, the damage to starboard looks pretty minor all told and from my outside perspective with little data, its a heck of a lot less work to scarf that port side panel (and most of the underwater bow portion) in than it would be a complete cut and replace bow job. The latter is what I thought they would do, but as you point out the structure went in before the deck...the approach I outlined above would leave that structure intact.

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The newly fabricated panel is likely incomplete and more for purpose of bow shape/essentially a female mold for the foam/inner hull laminate which I presume will be vacuumed bagged in Auckland. 

The cutting and grinding work beforehand will be more like Japanese woodworking than sandwich construction. 

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3 hours ago, Al Paca said:

Hope they remove any imbedded body parts from the core before they vacuum bag.

I hope they shove them up your ass sideways you fuckwit.

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2 hours ago, Al Paca said:

Hope they remove any imbedded body parts from the core before they vacuum bag.

Not funny. Not even close.

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6 hours ago, stief said:

For those looking for VS11 info, the VOR just retweeted this:

followed a minute later by this:

Ultra careful not to show the damming evidence-guilty conscience?Yes,I have changed my mind since I was giving them the benefit of the doubt. You've got to hit something bloody hard to do that.

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1 hour ago, Grubbie said:

Ultra careful not to show the damming evidence-guilty conscience?Yes,I have changed my mind since I was giving them the benefit of the doubt. You've got to hit something bloody hard to do that.

Unless it was a hgh speed surfacing from a rocket powered submarine,they were the one's doing the hitting (trident?)

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13 hours ago, Bill E Goat said:

How do the maintain the structural rigidity if there aren't the continuous fibres as it would have had when originally built without adding additional laminate hence extra weight  

The extra weight of additional carbon doesn't matter as they can just add it to each boat, can't they?

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A scarf joint with a remarkably small additional amount of carbon will get you back full strength. Carbon is somewhat miraculous in this respect. Even an unaugmented scarf joint gets you a very close to an original strength joint. (This does assume highly controlled resin content, which these boats are.)

I think the class rule does allow for additional boat weights, but one would want to check.  It isn't just the weight that matters here, you want stiffness to be controlled between the boats.

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There are corrector weights on each boat to make them dead nuts even weight wise; its a pretty small amount of lead IIRC, like 1kg, but that might be sufficient in the case of Vestas. The trouble is as Francis outlines, for example its easy to glue a carbon mast back together, its much harder to glue it back together and maintain the original stiffness.

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Just ask Ben Ainslie, he knows a thing or two about repairing large holes in a short space of time. :D

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The damaged area sure looks like the laminations might have been a bit dry. I know they want max CF to resin ratios but a tad more resin might have kept things from peeling so far. Just thinking out loud. Amazing that they can piece things back together without massive extra weight. 

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6 hours ago, thetruth said:

There s such a good story going to waste here. What about daily updates and genuine interviews with the boat builders????

As if there are any real sailing journalists in NZ....

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On 2/14/2018 at 8:35 AM, samc99us said:

There are corrector weights on each boat to make them dead nuts even weight wise; its a pretty small amount of lead IIRC, like 1kg,

~20 kg

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