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49 minutes ago, Bill E Goat said:

In 1992 I was using Compuserve.  It was my first email address and the first email I ever got had "Want to meet Russian woman" Some things never change

in 1992 I was still using magazines.

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Speaking of diving, I just saw on news.com.au that today billionaire Paul Allen's personal research ship discovered the sunken aircraft carrier USS Lexington 2 miles below the surface of the Coral Sea 500 miles off the East Coast of Australia. The ship sunk  in battle on May 8m 1942. The underwater video is remarkable, good clarity, shows aircraft, guns, well-preserved. 

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23 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

Speaking of diving, I just saw on news.com.au that today billionaire Paul Allen's personal research ship discovered the sunken aircraft carrier USS Lexington 2 miles below the surface of the Coral Sea 500 miles off the East Coast of Australia. The ship sunk  in battle on May 8m 1942. The underwater video is remarkable, good clarity, shows aircraft, guns, well-preserved. 

Minor thread drift detected....

:mellow::)

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5 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Ok, Searob, I gotta ask: technical diving is: cave diving? diving in lava tubes? commercial diving? Underwater hockey. How does that work?  I scuba dive, but need more information about this stuff. 

Technical diving is diving with different gasses than air and/or with different equipment than Open Circuit. I dive a rebreather, where the breathing gas circulates, gets cleaned of CO2 and the oxygen level is replenished. This allows you to dive longer with an optimal composition of breathing gas.

Underwater hockey (Google it, it's fun) is played with mask, snorkel and fins on the bottom of the pool with a lead puck and a short stick. A team consists out of 10 players with 6 in the water. Referees are in the water too.

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On 3/5/2018 at 9:32 PM, jack_sparrow said:

 

OK hoppy if you insist.

Hey Andalay you 1992 web surfer you.

The first few hundred web sites in the world began in 1993 and most of them were at US colleges. The first available web browser was Netscape's released in late 1994.  The 28,800 bit/s V.34 modem standard was not introduced until 1994. Internet Explorer 1.0, was not released until the second half  of 1995.

Surfing a bit of string doesn't count.

 

The Internet was preceded by Fidonet which was fairly well established by the mid '80's ..

The early Bulletin Boards Systems (BBS) mostly catered for computer enthusiasts but it became very popular for BBS dedicated to genealogy.

The Fidonet BBS also supported email but the slow modems meant that the system used a batch method to transport the data about so the BBS was online 24/7 but the users would logon to upload and download their data .. it worked quite well but it was eventually displaced by the Internet.

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Back on the water today! It’s great to be back at it here in Auckland. I can’t speak highly enough of everyone who have given their support and helped us to get back out onto the water. Thank you! All that remains to be seen is whether the boat is as good as new or better than ever... Looking forward to finding out. - SciFi

Screen Shot 2018-03-06 at 8.13.07 PM.png

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14 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Back on the water today! It’s great to be back at it here in Auckland. I can’t speak highly enough of everyone who have given their support and helped us to get back out onto the water. Thank you! All that remains to be seen is whether the boat is as good as new or better than ever... Looking forward to finding out. - SciFi

Screen Shot 2018-03-06 at 8.13.07 PM.png

Good job, guys. Great to see you back on the water.

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37 minutes ago, ModernViking said:

Great article with a very detailed description of the whole rebuild process.

"We were lucky that the mould still existed at Persico Marine (Italy) - as they had discussed chopping it up. Fortunately, they had the builders available to pull the mould out, dust it off and get it ready to go which they were able to start immediately."

If Persico had cut up the Volvo 65 mould, then Erkelens says "they would have had to build a piece section of mould, which would have taken another week, and pushed up against the leg start - so it just wouldn't have allowed us to rejoin the fleet for the NZ leg start worked."

Corrector weights carried in the boat have been adjusted to compensate for the 10kg increase in hull weight as a result of the repair.

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6 hours ago, southerncross said:

 

10kg increase in hull weight as a result of the repair.

interesting, good perspective. now knowing the hull weight increase, it'd make sense that's how much the repair would weigh. 

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6 hours ago, southerncross said:

If Persico had cut up the Volvo 65 mould, then Erkelens says "they would have had to build a piece section of mould, which would have taken another week, and pushed up against the leg start - so it just wouldn't have allowed us to rejoin the fleet for the NZ leg start worked."

Nearly a week appeared to be burnt getting the thing on a ship so it was still doable. 

As executed if you subtract that delay and shipping time they turned this repair around in just over 3 weeks. That alone is impressive ignoring the logistical nightmare, insurance etc.

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On 06/02/2018 at 11:44 AM, jack_sparrow said:

You are assuming this is the last time these 65's go around. Looking at current RO organisational capacity bet on either;

1. A third tour for the 65's next edition, or if not, 

2. The next edition is in foilers/ whatever, but will be next century, or

 3. This is the last time we see the VOR.

Looks like number 1 above can finally be scrubbed off the list with this quote.

"We were lucky that the mould still existed at Persico Marine (Italy) - as they had discussed chopping it up". 

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17 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Looks like number 1 above can finally be scrubbed off the list with this quote.

"We were lucky that the mould still existed at Persico Marine (Italy) - as they had discussed chopping it up". 

 

Option #2 is already well underway for the next edition "with the whole fleet ready by the middle of 2019".

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/9893_Exclusive-first-look-at-the-next-Volvo-Ocean-Race-boat-design.html

 

Exclusive first look at the next Volvo Ocean Race boat design

Work is well underway on the racing machines of the future – and here's a sneak peek at the Guillaume Verdier's exciting 60-ft foiling monohull concept
August 22, 2017 08:34 UTC
Text by Mark Chisnell

Just over three months ago, on 18 May 2017, Volvo Ocean Race CEO Mark Turner stood on a stage in the Volvo Museum in Gothenburg and announced that the question of whether the future of the race was monohull or multihull had been solved.

In fact, the Volvo Ocean Race had opted for both – and would design and build a one-design foil-assisted 60-foot (18.29 metre) monohull for the ocean legs, and a one-design 32-50 foot foiling catamaran (10-15 metre) for use inshore at the stopovers.

Now, with the 2017-18 edition already apace following a thrilling Leg Zero, work on the two new boats has been moving very fast in the background.

This week, the first mock up of the Guillaume Verdier-designed offshore monohull was revealed at the Boatyard in Lisbon – and it looks incredible.

 

m102724_crop169014_1024x576_proportional © Brian Carlin/Volvo Ocean Race

 

“We contacted several designers and asked them to submit their ideas for both a complete stand-alone Volvo Ocean Race boat, or with the potential to convert to an IMOCA boat,” said Bice.

“All the designers that we invited to present were very strong, it wasn’t clear cut – we had some pretty serious soul-searching to decide what we wanted to do. I went to New Zealand and spent a day with Guillaume to get to know him, and we decided he was our man.”

Verdier recently came to prominence as a designer for the foiling 2016 Vendée Globe boats, and for the 36th America’s Cup winners, Emirates Team New Zealand.

 

m102725_crop169014_1024x576_proportional © Brian Carlin/Volvo Ocean Race

 

“We’ve created the Volvo Ocean Race Design Team as a collaboration, getting the best input from everywhere,” said Bice. “It’s going to be a very cool boat; imagine coming into the finish, in a harbour in 20 knots of breeze and you are going to see this thing fully airborne, foiling, at 35 to 40 knots.” 

Verdier has now gathered his team around him, and they have been working hard on the hull lines. The design has developed in a way that will enable IMOCA 60 compatibility, making it convertible, relatively quickly and inexpensively, to a short-handed rules-compliant IMOCA boat for events like the solo Vendée Globe and two-up Barcelona World Race. 

“We don’t think there is any compromise to making a stand-alone Volvo Ocean Race boat comply with the IMOCA 60 rules. Although in Volvo mode, we will have another keel, we will have different rudders, foils, we will have a different rig on it,” said Bice. 

 

m102726_crop169014_1024x576_proportional © Brian Carlin/Volvo Ocean Race

 

“So now, with the new two-year race cycle, a team can compete in an IMOCA event in between, maintaining profile for a sponsor and making it much easier for them to commit to two cycles of the Volvo Ocean Race. That’s what we want to try and achieve.

“We are on a critical path with the plan that the eighth boat has to be launched by June 2019, that’s the bookend of the whole project. Working all the way back from that, we need to start machining the moulds in September. Then we need to start laminating the first boat at the end of February, early March next year.

“Persico will be the lead contractor, it’s about 40,000 hours per boat but we want to try and eliminate the need for transportation, so they will definitely do the hull and deck, put the composite shell together. Then it gets delivered to The Boatyard in Lisbon, and we will do the painting and the fit out. It’s very similar to what we did with AkzoNobel, the latest Volvo Ocean 65 built for this race.”

This is where Neil Cox and his Boatyard team will come in. “Roughly, it will take six months at Persico so the first boat will arrive at The Boatyard facility in September 2018, two months after the next race ends. It needs to be finished by the end of November 2018, with the whole fleet ready by the middle of 2019. So we get a new boat every four weeks. It will go into our process for roughly three months, painting, fit-out and then branding of the boat,” said Cox.

The tender period closed for the inshore foiling multihull at 1200 CEST on the 31 July and 16 proposals were received – a remarkable response from the marine industry. 

Nick Bice – Chief Technical Development Officer – and his team must sift through them and make a decision on which proposal to take forward. “We want to announce the result during the prerace festivities, in Alicante in mid-October,” Bice explained, taking a short break from Leg Zero debriefing with Cox.

And all this with a race going on at the same time. “It’s a demanding time,” added Cox. “In the last three weeks emails have started coming in quicker than you can fire them back out. Normally you can manage your email, but now the computer updates itself, and you are like, ‘How did 30 emails just come in, in 10 minutes?’ You can feel the momentum building from every angle.”

And with that, it’s time for the guys to get back to it.

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14 minutes ago, Diva39 said:

Option #2 is already well underway for the next edition "with the whole fleet ready by the middle of 2019".

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/9893_Exclusive-first-look-at-the-next-Volvo-Ocean-Race-boat-design.html

 

Exclusive first look at the next Volvo Ocean Race boat design

That news is 7 month's old. They have subsequently announced that the foiling OD is on hold and now missed the build deadline for the next edition.

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and that the 2019 date is also not going to take place.

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9 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

That news is 7 month's old. They have subsequently announced that the foiling OD is on hold and now missed the build deadline for the next edition.

 

9 hours ago, DtM said:

and that the 2019 date is also not going to take place.

Thanks. Haven't heard that part. Do you have a link to that news?

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Do your own work rather than me doing it for you.

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One would think that the content of your months old post above is already well-known to this forum.

The change of plans happened shortly after the complete management meltdown.

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28 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

One would think that the content of your months old post above is already well-known to this forum.

The change of plans happened shortly after the complete management meltdown.

Probably well known to people, who have been part of the forum for more than 1½ month.

The reason I entered this forum (right after the VS11 collision), is actually the massive supply of information, that I missed before.

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3 hours ago, Diva39 said:

Probably well known to people, who have been part of the forum for more than 1½ month.

The reason I entered this forum (right after the VS11 collision), is actually the massive supply of information, that I missed before.

there are one thousand comments on that on the VOR 2017-18, VOR 2019-20 and VOR Mgmt MIA threads... 

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4 hours ago, Diva39 said:

Probably well known to people, who have been part of the forum for more than 1½ month.

You’ve never let that stop you from running your mouth before. 

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1 hour ago, jackolantern said:

You’ve never let that stop you from running your mouth before. 

Why should I?

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Diva39: Here is my advice, as a relative newbie. Before you ask something that is not a "new" occurrence, use the "search" feature on the top right hand side of Sailing Anarchy. Or check the various forums (fora?) for subject matter. I was lightly smacked for asking about something that had b in previously discussed, when I first joined one of the forums. So I spent a lot of time, because I was interested, in reading the threads of those forums/fora I was interested in. I learned a lot (some good, some bad). I knew the information in your inquiry above was stale because I have been following the race since before it left Alicante, though not on SA; the VOR RC itself announced almost simultaneous with Mark Turner's resignation that the type of boat(s) and the schedule for the next edition of the race  that had previously been proposed were no longer valid. It was stated that the information would be updated, but first the new race directors had to be chosen and then they obviously got pretty busy esp with Vestas 11. Anyway, that's my input. 

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7 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Diva39: Here is my advice, as a relative newbie. Before you ask something that is not a "new" occurrence, use the "search" feature on the top right hand side of Sailing Anarchy. Or check the various forums (fora?) for subject matter. I was lightly smacked for asking about something that had b in previously discussed, when I first joined one of the forums. So I spent a lot of time, because I was interested, in reading the threads of those forums/fora I was interested in. I learned a lot (some good, some bad). I knew the information in your inquiry above was stale because I have been following the race since before it left Alicante, though not on SA; the VOR RC itself announced almost simultaneous with Mark Turner's resignation that the type of boat(s) and the schedule for the next edition of the race  that had previously been proposed were no longer valid. It was stated that the information would be updated, but first the new race directors had to be chosen and then they obviously got pretty busy esp with Vestas 11. Anyway, that's my input. 

despacio - thank you for your advice, and your politeness, which I appreciate. And thank you for further updating me on this announcement.

The case is that I actually followed both this and the previous races since before leg 0, but my information supply was a lot more sporadic until I found the dense supply of info here on SA.

That's why I knew the article about mocking up of the 60 ft foiler, but didn't know it was later put on hold. So as jack_sparrow speculated about the next boat type, I concluded wrongly that he missed the news from 7 month ago, so I chose to post it, to his and others information.

Having no idea about the later announcement, I couldn't see any reason to search on that.

So Jack and CtM replied, politely and without any sarcasm or provocation:

On 8/3/2018 at 1:13 AM, jack_sparrow said:

That news is 7 month's old. They have subsequently announced that the foiling OD is on hold and now missed the build deadline for the next edition.

 

On 8/3/2018 at 1:19 AM, DtM said:

and that the 2019 date is also not going to take place.

So I thanked politely for the update, and asked whether there was a link, as I couldn't find it on VOR's website.

CtM answered (not so politely):

On 8/3/2018 at 10:51 AM, DtM said:

Do your own work rather than me doing it for you.

Whether DtM doesn't have a link on hand, or simply just don't want to provide it, is absolutely up to him, and if I had any problem with the lack of politeness, I would probably have left this place weeks ago.

But I appreciate the updated knowledge I already got from you, jack and DtM, and will search more info about it on this forum when I got the time.

Enjoy the inport race later today, and have a nice weekend. ;)

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^Well, that's very polite..... 

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Polite..I feel like I just got hit with a reach-around.

Enjoy.

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Fishing Boats 'Going Dark' Raise Suspicion Of Illegal Catches, Report Says:

A new report raises concerns that when fishing vessels "go dark" by switching off electronic tracking devices, in many cases they are doing so to mask the taking of illegal catches in protected marine parks and restricted national waters.

In the report released Monday by Oceana, an international conservation group, authors Lacey Malarky and Beth Lowell document incidents of fishing vessels that disappear from computer screens as they shut off collision-avoidance beacons near restricted areas, only to have them reappear days or weeks later back in legal fishing grounds.

"This practice of vessels going dark is really widespread on a global scale," Malarky tells NPR.

Malarky and Lowell used Global Fishing Watch, which aggregates automatic identification system, or AIS, signals to give an unprecedented view of global fishing activity. AIS signals can be viewed by the public through such websites as Vesselfinder.com.

Yet another system, known as Vessel Management System, or VMS, is not available to the public but is used by countries to monitor their fishing fleets. However, "some countries can't afford it — developing countries like those in West Africa," Malarky says. "So, a lot of developing countries rely on AIS to monitor their fishing fleet."

AIS has been around for about 20 years and is designed to give valuable information about a vessel — including its type and size, location, course and speed — to other vessels to help avoid collisions at sea. The International Maritime Organization requires all commercial vessels in international waters larger than 65 feet to have the system aboard.

Even so, when it comes to transmitting AIS, there are exceptions. Among them, AIS can be switched off at a captain's discretion for security reasons, such as when transiting an area where piracy is a concern. Loopholes such as these, Oceana says, can be exploited by unscrupulous fishing vessels to move in and out of no-take areas undetected.

Sifting through millions of incidents of vessels "going dark" — many presumably for legitimate reasons — the report details four cases that the authors believe are particularly suspicious:

The European Commission and the Spanish government have opened investigations into the cases spotlighted by Oceana, Malarky tells NPR. "It's an unprecedented step for the EU in terms of AIS non-compliance."

"What they are going to do is cross-check" the blanks in the AIS picture against VMS "to see if maybe they were fishing where they weren't supposed to be."

She says these individual incidents only serve to draw attention to what Oceana believes is a much larger problem.

"We really wanted to highlight these cases of vessels in suspicious areas where they are turning off their AIS, like no-take marine protected areas where commercial fishing is prohibited [and in] developing countries' waters, where [those countries] may not have effective monitoring and control policies in place," she says.

The report's authors recommend that governments require vessels flying their flag be required to notify authorities when they turn off AIS, giving the reason.

Right now, Malarky says, "there's no public accountability" for suspicious behavior and that by requiring vessels to explain why they may have turned off AIS, authorities would be able to better monitor what is going on.

"When we find these instances in suspicious locations, we need to be able to cross-check and say, 'this vessel was concerned about this' and not doing anything illegal," she says.

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/03/11/592802471/fishing-boats-going-dark-raise-suspicion-of-illegal-catches-report-says

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Interesting. This indicates that the rumour I heard about the vessel being on tow was not correct, based on this report. Or at least was not being towed by the lit vessel they went up to cross in front of.  As stated, vessel they hit had 'some lights'.

Will be interested to find out what?

I am still somewhat amazed they would luff ten degrees to pass in front of a vessel. Of course, this would make perfect sense if the vessel was doing typical fishing boat speeds of 8 knots and they could simply wind up ten degrees and go from 20 to 18 and squirt past. 

There is still much of interest here to the likes of me.

Someone has screenshot recordings of Vestas Nav outputs including AIS. Will be interesting to see if these ever get released.

B)

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Andalay said:

Interesting. This indicates that the rumour I heard about the vessel being on tow was not correct, based on this report. Or at least was not being towed by the lit vessel they went up to cross in front of.  As stated, vessel they hit had 'some lights'.

Will be interested to find out what?

I am still somewhat amazed they would luff ten degrees to pass in front of a vessel. Of course, this would make perfect sense if the vessel was doing typical fishing boat speeds of 8 knots and they could simply wind up ten degrees and go from 20 to 18 and squirt past. 

There is still much of interest here to the likes of me.

Someone has screenshot recordings of Vestas Nav outputs including AIS. Will be interesting to see if these ever get released.

B)

 

 

 

 

This brings us back to our previous conversation about turning to starboard being standard practice under the COLREGs. If this wasn't the standard, they ran the risk of turning to port and the fishing boat turning to starboard and a collision between those two boats becoming more likely. The "some light" comment confuses me. If it was a nav light, it had to be visible at an absolute minimum of 1 mile to be COLREGs compliant regardless of boat size. The fact that the IJ ruled on 62.1(b) means that Vestas must have satisfied the "no fault" requirement somehow. There is so much we don't know about this incident, but you don't get to apply 62.1(b) without at least the preamble to the rule being satisfied. You must prove no fault first before any of the four redress qualifications can be taken into account. Or at least that's how US Sailing taught me during my judge's training.

The facts read like they just didn't have enough information. Vestas hit something, never saw it, and it sank. Too much unknown for the jury to make the call. Surely Vestas wouldn't have gone through this without clearing it with their sponsors and definitely not if there was any chance that a legal authority would find them in any way at fault. Anyone who suggests that they were just cowboy sailors looking to enhance their score without consideration for their sponsors' brands doesn't know shit from fuck.

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Its long since swept under the rug and not worth arguing about but I did have a laugh at this claimed "fact" which I do not for a moment believe is true...

  *  The other vessel ‘s type, activity, course and speed have not been identified

 

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Time to Rethink Offshore Conditions

Published on March 21st, 2018 

Not long after seven Volvo Ocean Race teams were forced to find safe passage through the crowded waters off Hong Kong, with a collision between Vestas 11th Hour Racing and a fishing boat resulting in one fatality, the Clipper 2017-18 Round the World Yacht Race put their fleet of 11 boats to a similar test.

From the start in Sanya, the Clipper 70 skippers were passing through the same waters enroute to Qingdao and quickly faced the chaotic conditions of the region. Though unlike the Volvo fleet which were beam reaching at 20+ knots, the Clipper crews were fortunate to be sailing at less than half that pace.

Visibility is imperative for safe passage. But add darkness or fog, exasperate it with speed and racing mentality, and navigating through regions with known fishing fleets becomes a game of Russian Roulette.

After the finish, here’s what two of the skippers had to say:

Dale Smyth, Dare To Lead:
It’s an absolute nightmare – I mean they’re just thousands upon thousands. It’s like trying to run across a busy freeway in the dark and then a bit of fog. It’s really tough. It’s been the toughest part of this race.

Probably a good twenty percent are not on AIS, and then you start to get a bit of fog and you’re running along with a spinnaker up because we’re racing, and it’s really very stressful. The fact that we’re all here without having hit a fishing boat or had any accidents is really a testament to all the skipper’s here because it’s very very challenging.

David Hartshortn, GREAT Britain:
Initially you’re all in awe of just the sheer volume of these boats. We’re talking hundreds of boats all within a very concentrated area. The way that they move, it’s very very coordinated. You’ll be looking at a piece of empty sea, and then three or four minutes later, there will be 50 vessels there to get around now. Until you experience it, and this was the second time I’ve experienced it; actually I’d forgotten quite what it was like. But it’s a challenge. It is a challenge.

http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2018/03/21/time-rethink-offshore-conditions/

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