DryArmour

HURRICANE SEASON 2018-LESS THAN 100 DAYS AWAY

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Hurricane Season 2018-Have your insurance in place people. Less than 100 days until the Pacific season starts and 115 days for the Atlantic and Caribbean. Many companies have a 30 day waiting period before it goes into effect. The SST anomaly for most of the Caribbean is a little over one degree C at this point. Not a lot of upper atmospheric pinwheels so the shear may once again be less of a downer for storms with big aspirations. Please don't forget about the islands that are still trying to recover from the 2017 season. Soggy Dollar Bar is back in action as are a few other nice spots that are cruising favorites on JVD.
 
Turn on some Calypso or Steel Drum music and then click this link. You are welcome.
 
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Aaaaack.

But thanks for being a knowledgeable source when we get there.

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Regarding hurricane prep, the locals here have a saying: "June - too soon, July - stand by, August - you must".

Having said that, the weather these last two months has been way more out of character than I can remember in my 24 years living in this area.

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No fear mongering from me ever. I leave that to the weather channel and you local news weather people. This was meant as a reminder to start shopping for insurance now and not wait.

While the hurricane season usually gets into "full swing" in August for the Atlantic/Caribbean/GOM, Tropical systems have struck much earlier.  Here is some trivia for you to ponder: (Some of the intensity data may now be outdated)

  • Earliest tropical storm formed: Subtropical Storm One, January 18, 1978, through January 23, 1978, 45 mph. Excluding this subtropical storm, the Groundhog Day Tropical Storm of 1952 February 2, 1952-February 3, 1952 with 50 mph winds was the earliest formed in a calendar year.
  • Earliest Hurricane formed in a calendar year: March 6, 1908 Hurricane
  • Earliest Category 3+ hurricane : Hurricane Able, May 15, 1951 (In May/June 1825 there was a major hurricane also, but there is less information available about it due to the records of the time.)
  • Earliest hurricane in existence in a calendar year: Hurricane Alice, January 1-6, 80mpg 1955 (and December 31, 1954), formed the previous year. The earliest tropical storm was Tropical Storm Zeta in 2005-2006 (see below)
  • Latest tropical storm formed: Tropical Storm Zeta, 11am AST, December 30, 2005. Previous, Hurricane Alice 1am EST, December 30, 1954.
  • Latest hurricane formed: Hurricane Alice 1am EST, December 30, 1954. The only two cross-season storms on record are Hurricane Alice in 1954-1955 and Tropical Storm Zeta 2005-2006 (See below).
  • Latest hurricane in existence from previous year: Hurricane Alice, 1954-1955, January 6, 1955 (see Tropical Storm Zeta, January 6, 2006 for the latest Tropical Storm in existence)
  • Strongest (most intense) hurricane: Hurricane Wilma 2005, 882 millibars (mb) (the previous most intense hurricane was Hurricane Gilbert 1988 at 888 mb)
  • Strongest land-falling United States Hurricane: Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, 160mph 892 mbar
  • Longest lived hurricane :Hurricane San Ciriaco, August 1899 (28 days), Hurricane Ginger September 1971 (27.25 days), Hurricane Inga September 1969, 24.75 days, Hurricane Kyle September 2002, 22 days, Hurricane Carrie, September 1957 & Hurricane Inez September 1966 (20.75 days).
  • Longest Category 5 hurricane: Hurricane Allen, 1980, reached Category 5 status on 3 occasions (Ivan and Isabel did the same, but Allen lasted longer). Hurricane Dog 1950 2.50 days; Hurricane Isabel 2003, Hurricane David 1979, Hurricane Mitch 1998 all 1.75 days.
  • Most storms per season: 28 in 2005 season (revised upward by 1 April 2006) (previous: 21 named storms in 1933).
  • Fewest storms per season (since 1965): 1983 4 storms; 1965, 1977, 1982, 1986, 6 storms; 1972, 1987, 1992, 1994, 7 storms
  • What happens if they run out of names? The Greek alphabet is used: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, Epsilon, Zeta, eta, theta,iota, kappa, lambda, mu, nu xi, omikron, pi, rho, sigma,tau,upsilon,phi, chi, psi, omega.
  • When do they start with the following season's names? January 1 of the year, not June 1st when the Atlantic hurricane season begins or May 15th for the Pacific hurricane season. However storms that overlap from one calendar year into another are not renamed.
  • Strongest January hurricane: Hurricane Alice, January 1955, 80 mph winds (peak January 2, 1955) (The naming is a story in itself since it became a tropical storm Dec 30, 1954 but advisories weren't issued until January 1955, so it was given the name Alice, which made it the second Alice for 1954 - at that time names were re-used each year), December 30, 1954-January 6, 1955. Tropical Storm Zeta December 30, 2005-January 6, 2006. Subtropical Storm One, January 18, 1978 45 mph winds is the only storm formed in January.
  • Strongest February tropical storm: Groundhog Day Storm of 1952 February 2, 1952-February 3, 1952, 50 mph
  • Strongest March hurricane: March 6, 1908 Hurricane, category 2 storm.
  • Strongest April tropical storm: Ana 2003 (the only April storm in fact), April 20-April 24, 60 mph winds, 994 mb
  • Strongest May hurricane:Hurricane Able 1951 (Category 3), 1908 Hurricane (Category ?), Alma 1970 (Cat 1), Tropical Storm 1933, May 15, 1887 (70mph) & May 17, 1887 (60 mph), earliest two storms active at once. Tropical Storm One, May 22, 1948 (50mph). Tropical Storm One, May 19, 1940.
  • Strongest June hurricane: Hurricane Audrey, June 25-29, 1957 (145mph, 946 mbar) (see also Alma 1966, 130 mph, 970 mbar and Agnes June 14-25, 1972 did a lot of damage, 85mph, 977 mbar)
  • Strongest July hurricane: Emily, 2005 (161 mph top sustained winds - earliest recorded category 5 hurricane) (previous record: Dennis (150 mph) 2005; Hurricane #1 (140 mph) in 1926.
  • Strongest August hurricane: Allen 1980 899 mbar, 190 mph (see also Katrina, 2005 175 mph sustained winds, 902 mbar; Hurricane Camille, August 1969, 190 mph, 905 mbar; Andrew, August 1992, 175mph, 922 mbar)
  • Strongest September hurricane: Gilbert, 185 mph, 888 mbar, (see Rita, 2005 175 mph, 897 mbar; Hurricane Janet, 1955, 175mph 914 mb)
  • Strongest October hurricane: Wilma 2005, 175 mph, 882 mbar. Wilma became the most intense hurricane in the Atlantic Basin ever recorded.
  • Strongest November hurricane: Lenny, 1999, November 13-23. 155 mph, 933 mbar. Also notable for its eastward motion. Tied with Michelle in 2001 based on central pressure of 933 mbar, 140 mph wind.
  • Strongest December hurricane: 1925 Hurricane, December 4, 1925, (100mph); see Hurricane Epsilon 2005 , 85mph, 979 mbar and Hurricane Nicole of 1998 85mph; see also Hurricane Lili 1984 80mph. Hurricane Epsilon 2005 is the longest lasting December storm.
  • Season with most hurricanes: 2005 with 15 Hurricanes (previous record: 12 in 1969)
  • Most major hurricanes hitting the U.S.: 4 in 2005 (previous record: three in 2004). Major hurricanes are category 3+.
  • Most tornadoes spawned: Hurricane Frances, 2004 (123), Hurricane Ivan 2004 (117), Hurricane Beulah 1967, (115), Hurricane Katrina 2005 (30). Hurricane Andrew also was notable for its tornados in the South Miami area.
  • Most Category 5 Hurricanes in one season: 4 in 2005 (Emily, Katrina, Rita, Wilma) (previous record: two in 1960 and 1961)
  • Most Tropical Storms/hurricanes before August 1: 7 in 2005 (previous record: five in 1997)
  • Most two-year consecutive total Tropical Storms: 2004-2005, 41 (previous record: 32 most recently in 1995-96)
  • Most two-year consecutive total Hurricanes: 2005, 25 (previous record: 21 in 1886-87)
  • Most Two-Year Consecutive Total of Major Hurricanes: 2004-2005, 13 (ties record in 1950-51)
  • Most Two-Year Consecutive Major Hurricane Landfalls: 2004-2005, Seven (previous record: five in 1954-55)
  • Most Two-Year Consecutive Florida Major Hurricane Landfalls: 2004-2005, Five (previous record: three in 1949-50)
  • Most Three-Year Consecutive Total of Tropical Storms: 2003,2004,2005, 57 (previous record: 43 most recently in 2002-04)
  • Most Three-Year Consecutive Total of Hurricanes: 2005, 31 (previous record: 27 in 1886-88)
  • Most Three-Year Consecutive Total of Major Hurricanes: 2003,2004,2005, 16 (ties record in 1949-51 and 1950-52)
  • Deadliest U.S. Hurricane since 1928: Katrina, 2005 (at least 1,300).
  • 2005 had three of the six strongest hurricanes on record: Wilma 882 mb (1st), Rita 897 mb (4th), Katrina 902 mb (6th)
  • Earliest hurricane to strike the United States: Alma struck northwest Florida on June 9, 1966.
  • Four hurricanes have existed simultaneously twice: August 22, 1893 and September 25-27, 1998 with Georges, Ivan, Jeanne and Karl as hurricanes. In 1971 there were 5 tropical cyclones simultaneously, but only 2 were hurricanes.
  • Latest hurricane to strike the U. S.: late on November 30, 1925 near Tampa, Florida.
  • Most storm names retired in a single year: 2005, 5 names. Previous record 4 names in 1955, 1995 and, 2004.
  • Only Tropical Storm (e.g. it never was a hurricane) name retired: Allison, 2001. It was a huge rain event and did enough damage to be retired.
  • Longest July Tropical System (Hurricane or Tropical Storm):
  • Earliest far-East Atlantic storm: Hurricane Bertha (July 3, 2008-July 20, 2008) (surpassing 1995's Bertha which formed 2 days later and several hundred miles to the west)
  • Longest lasting July Hurricane/Tropical Storm: Hurricane Bertha, July 3, 2008-July 20, 2008.
  • Most landfalls in a particular state, Florida: Tropical Storm Fay, 2008, when it hit the Florida Keys, Southwest Florida (near Naples), Northeast Florida (near Flagler Beach), and the Florida Panhandle (near Apalachicola, Florida).
  • Fastest moving hurricane or tropical storm:Now the question here is what are the fastest moving storms? This is important because forward speed can impact both wind velocity and surge, and decrease the flooding from rain. The fastest recorded hurricane was "The Long Island Express" in 1938, a category 3 storm. It was travelling between 60 and 70 miles per hour!

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, jackolantern said:

Fucking fearmonger

That's the last thing DryArmour is, trust me--and all of us.

You haven't been on this site all that long??

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1 hour ago, savoir said:

Looks like Charlie Watts.

My thought exactly.

rs-188587-73033877.jpg

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How’s the hurricane season looking for the eastern Pacific?

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Our new hurricane shutters should be coming this week, but that only solves part of the preparation problem.

I wanted to make sure that things like my golf cart, mowers, fuel, chainsaws, generators, tarps, water, and the other things that are needed for recovery could remain safe through a storm without being in the house.

shipcontaindelivery.jpg

Yeah, that ought to hold it all.

And bake it at close to 200 degrees in August, I'd guess. Not good. So it turned white and is getting a corrugated roof this week.

shipcontainroof.jpg

It's a high cube, so lots of sail area.

shipcontainclosed.jpg

So now I'm to the part where I try to figure out how to make it stay in one place through a hurricane. It's not going to float away, or if it does, it won't matter. There would be nothing to rebuild if a storm comes that can push that much water this far.

So I want to keep the wind from blowing it away, or even just tipping it over. It's the kind of problem that makes me look at a 15,000 lb ratchet strap and think, "Enough?" Suggestions welcome.

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10 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

 .......So I want to keep the wind from blowing it away, or even just tipping it over. It's the kind of problem that makes me look at a 15,000 lb ratchet strap and think, "Enough?" Suggestions welcome.

...perhaps fill it with concrete?   :mellow:

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11 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

 

It's a high cube, so lots of sail area.

So now I'm to the part where I try to figure out how to make it stay in one place through a hurricane. It's not going to float away, or if it does, it won't matter. There would be nothing to rebuild if a storm comes that can push that much water this far.

So I want to keep the wind from blowing it away, or even just tipping it over. It's the kind of problem that makes me look at a 15,000 lb ratchet strap and think, "Enough?" Suggestions welcome.

Good plan to paint it white and insulate the roof.  That should keep it a load cooler.

Is it still empty enough to be lift-able, just one end?  If so, get yourself a friend's backhaul and some strops, lift each end up in turn, and install a container corner mount at each corner, carefully measured, each with 4 or 5 long (24") anchor screws driven into the ground.  

http://52.191.195.192/products/detail/deck-mount-twistlock-with-raised-corner-plate-left-hand-5-hole for the mounts.

Long penetrator screws hold it all down.  https://americanea.americommerce.com/PE26-anchor-26-inch-Penetrator-with-1-inch-hex-head.htm

If you're on sand, just drive as many posts down near each corner that you can, and lash it.

YMMV

SB1470.RCP.LH_300_225_c1.jpg

pe26-penetrator-26-inch.png?bw=1000&w=1000&bh=1000&h=1000

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10 hours ago, Fat Point Jack said:

Are you worried about flooding like what happened to the folks around the corner from you on Prairie Creek after Irma?

No. Water from the sky has to go a short distance downhill before it's in the swamp. Only water coming up from the swamp can flood my property. It could happen in a bad enough storm, about the time it crested over the rooftops in PGI. The container is on the highest point, far from any trees, and is about 2' off the ground, which has about 12' elevation at that point.

 

40 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

If you're on sand, just drive as many posts down near each corner that you can, and lash it.

There's about 15' of sand over the limestone bedrock in this area. I got a big, 5' long screw type anchor that Florida Power and Light left here decades ago. I had the metal guy make 3 more like it. I think it's a 1" diameter steel rod. My plan was to put the bottoms in concrete and bury them, then run a big ratchet strap to each corner when a storm approaches.

How deep is set by the anchors I have. But how much concrete and how big a strap?

44 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

4 or 5 long (24") anchor screws driven into the ground.  

My F-27 plucked one of those from the ground with no trouble in Charlie. Fortunately, I had tied it to a little cypress tree. Who knew those were that strong? Saved the boat.

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50 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Good plan to paint it white and insulate the roof.  That should keep it a load cooler.

The difference it made has astonished me. It was darn hot inside that thing if any sun was hitting it. I opened it up about 11 am the morning after we painted it and a bunch of cool air fell out on me.

I'm not putting insulation, just a galvanized roof that will sit a foot or so above it and overhang the edges. This is so it's always in the shade, despite being far from trees, and to keep some of the water off it. The guy who sold it to me told me that the eventual death of all of them comes from dents on the top. Dent holds salt water and soon the roof leaks. This one was in pretty good shape. We jacked out some dents from the inside until the jack got loose and hit me in the face, then decided to just paint the rest and hope the roof-over means they don't need attention often.

Newly added to my list of things I know, but should not:

If things like a roll of insulation are inside and someone starts welding brackets to the roof, burning metal might cause a fire inside.

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27 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

The difference it made has astonished me. It was darn hot inside that thing if any sun was hitting it. I opened it up about 11 am the morning after we painted it and a bunch of cool air fell out on me.

White paint is the key, as is the air gap.  In Bermuda painting your roof white is mandatory.   The energy savings are immense.

Next step would be to swap out the corrugated roof for 360ft² of solar panels.   Finance-able, insurable, great in your climate.

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Quick back of thumb calc on sideways drag force:

8' x 40' = 320' sq ft. = say 30 m2

Force = 1/2 rho Cd A V^2 = 0.5 x 1.225 kg/m3 x 1.2 (flat plate) x 30 m2 x 60^2 m/s (close enough to 115 knots or so)

F = 79,380 N = 7900 kg = 8 tons.

I would use several screw in ground anchors but see if you can find some truckers "load binders", some chain, and tension them all equally. See if the load binder hooks will go into the container corner fittings. Otherwise get a big shackle and put it through the container fitting.

Webbing ratchet straps will stretch and then the wind will get under the box and tilt it.

Basically anything you do can't be too strong!

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I like it. Take a couple of pieces of I beam and weld some angled supports from the top to a plate base. Should keep it from getting too far.

 

WL

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6 hours ago, Zonker said:

Quick back of thumb calc on sideways drag force:

8' x 40' = 320' sq ft. = say 30 m2

Force = 1/2 rho Cd A V^2 = 0.5 x 1.225 kg/m3 x 1.2 (flat plate) x 30 m2 x 60^2 m/s (close enough to 115 knots or so)

F = 79,380 N = 7900 kg = 8 tons.

I would use several screw in ground anchors but see if you can find some truckers "load binders", some chain, and tension them all equally. See if the load binder hooks will go into the container corner fittings. Otherwise get a big shackle and put it through the container fitting.

Webbing ratchet straps will stretch and then the wind will get under the box and tilt it.

Basically anything you do can't be too strong!

High cube is 9' 6" high by 40 long, so a bigger sail. And I'm more concerned about winds above 150 knots. Amen to your last line. I keep going back to the insane power required to do this:

On 3/5/2017 at 3:37 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

I have found two solutions to controlling bamboo. The easiest is to just have a hurricane. That will get you to this point:

 

charley-bamboos.jpg

 

After several days of sawing and hauling, it's possible to reduce this to something that it looks like a backhoe could handle. It can't. Neither can the other, stronger backhoe.

 

At this point, you need a bulldozer the size of a small house with 6' wheels to hit it a couple of times. Because a machine that size hitting bamboo that is just stuck by a tiny, muddy edge only once results in the machine bouncing off.

 

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On 4/10/2018 at 7:46 PM, Zonker said:

I would use several screw in ground anchors but see if you can find some truckers "load binders", some chain, and tension them all equally. See if the load binder hooks will go into the container corner fittings. Otherwise get a big shackle and put it through the container fitting.

Webbing ratchet straps will stretch and then the wind will get under the box and tilt it.

Looking into this more, I found this typical "transport grade" chain:

http://www.uscargocontrol.com/Transport-Chain-Grade-70-3-8X20-Short-Link?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI17uSp-u02gIVE8NkCh1cWgwNEAYYASABEgI6afD_BwE

6,600 lb working load limit. I liked the 15k working load limit on the big ratchet I saw in a store the other day a lot better, but still wonder if it's enough.

The container is off the ground so wind will be under it. If it slides or tilts a bit but remains on the RR ties, I can put it back. If it rolls off them it's going to be a big problem. If it slides off them without rolling, that wouldn't be quite as bad.

 

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On 4/11/2018 at 1:46 AM, Zonker said:

Quick back of thumb calc on sideways drag force:

8' x 40' = 320' sq ft. = say 30 m2

Force = 1/2 rho Cd A V^2 = 0.5 x 1.225 kg/m3 x 1.2 (flat plate) x 30 m2 x 60^2 m/s (close enough to 115 knots or so)

F = 79,380 N = 7900 kg = 8 tons.

I would use several screw in ground anchors but see if you can find some truckers "load binders", some chain, and tension them all equally. See if the load binder hooks will go into the container corner fittings. Otherwise get a big shackle and put it through the container fitting.

Webbing ratchet straps will stretch and then the wind will get under the box and tilt it.

Basically anything you do can't be too strong!

That is just the shear forces, you need also to catter for the overturning of the thing.

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Yes, note the first line "quick back of thumb calc on sideways drag force".

It just gives the rough magnitude of what the owner is trying to restrain. It's not a detailed engineering calc!

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Sorry Didn't mean to be aggressive, just typed too quick. I think that in real life the sideway forces aren't that bad in comparaison to the upward force that will happen on the windward sides as it is quite hard to hold down stuff, 1 cubic metre of concrete (really big block already) is just 2.5 t. 

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

Sorry Didn't mean to be aggressive, just typed too quick. I think that in real life the sideway forces aren't that bad in comparaison to the upward force that will happen on the windward sides as it is quite hard to hold down stuff, 1 cubic metre of concrete (really big block already) is just 2.5 t. 

I have a sorta plan for the sideway sliding force. Its on RR ties. I'm going to spike it so it has to take the RR tie with it if sliding.

That would just make the RR tie slide off the rock pile, so the second  part of the plan is to pour a bunch of concrete into the rock pile. If it slides, it will have to bring along the RR tie and a messy bunch of rocks and concrete.

I hope I don't decide I need a cubic meter of concrete at each corner anchor. My neighbor's mixer is broken and I don't want to mix that much by hand. Might even call a truck, I guess. But the concrete will be several feet underground and the ground and roots above the concrete have to count for something, right?

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6 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I have a sorta plan for the sideway sliding force. Its on RR ties. I'm going to spike it so it has to take the RR tie with it if sliding.

That would just make the RR tie slide off the rock pile, so the second  part of the plan is to pour a bunch of concrete into the rock pile. If it slides, it will have to bring along the RR tie and a messy bunch of rocks and concrete.

I hope I don't decide I need a cubic meter of concrete at each corner anchor. My neighbor's mixer is broken and I don't want to mix that much by hand. Might even call a truck, I guess. But the concrete will be several feet underground and the ground and roots above the concrete have to count for something, right?

Put a yellow Brick tracker on it and you'll save from wasting time on all these useless ideas.

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1 hour ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I hope I don't decide I need a cubic meter of concrete at each corner anchor. My neighbor's mixer is broken and I don't want to mix that much by hand. Might even call a truck, I guess. But the concrete will be several feet underground and the ground and roots above the concrete have to count for something, right?

Yes, it will help quite a bit.

For overturning forces it is also all about the geometry, if you have a narrow base the upward forces on the windward side and downward on the leeward side will be huge, if you widen the base it becomes manageable more easily. If you have space and want to make it work without too much effort / concrete you can build "hold down points" quite far away (2, 3 or 4 time the height) and you fasten the containers to these before the storms with  big ratchets like those they use on lorries. Then the "foundations" underneath the container can be relatively modest (just designed for gravity + the 8 tons of shear forces).

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I was just going to go a bit over 1x the height to make sure it was less than a 45 degree angle but there's plenty of room to go further and just buy longer straps or chains. Those will live inside the container until there's a hurricane watch or warning.

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16 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I was just going to go a bit over 1x the height to make sure it was less than a 45 degree angle but there's plenty of room to go further and just buy longer straps or chains. Those will live inside the container until there's a hurricane watch or warning.

We are now one month out for the start of Eastern Pacific Hurricane season...November 30, 2017 doesn't seem that long ago....(The end of the 2017 season)

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Wondering if, due to the northward expansion of the ITCZ, the spinners forming south of the BI Central Pacific will be a new component to generation this summer, and forward?

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It depends on where it is located and how exposed it is. If you have houses, structures around it you may not need too much. I have 3 two story houses to my east side, where the main winds came from during Irma, and I sat on my back porch while the eye passed about 10 miles to my west. The trees above the level of the houses were just screaming in the wind stream. I tried to record it on my cell phone but all you could hear was the rain pouring off of the roof.

From my experience watching these things since Andrew, you can anchor/protect things up to approx. 100 mph wind speeds, above that, all bets are off. Micro bursts, tornadoes, etc. get a lot crazier above that point.

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Can I delete a whole thread from my feed ?....I am not doing it again...boarded up 32 double hung windows on a 2 story 120 year old  house (Irma)...I am 70 now...I'll just lie down in bed and let nature take it's course 

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Anyone else notice that the rain over FL is rotating counterclockwise around a center just offshore in the Gulf?

I don't like it when they rotate counterclockwise.

My shipping container is still connected to the ground only by gravity.

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On 4/10/2018 at 5:15 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

Our new hurricane shutters should be coming this week

Note the date.

How things actually work: the shutters were installed a few days ago and are ready but the main opening that will kill the house is the triple slider. And the piece that will cover those doors is on back order. I'm sure they're just as eager to get it installed as I am since they don't get paid until it's up and passes inspection.

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On 2/6/2018 at 5:36 PM, seabell said:

Regarding hurricane prep, the locals here have a saying: "June - too soon, July - stand by, August - you must".

Having said that, the weather these last two months has been way more out of character than I can remember in my 24 years living in this area.

I thought June would be soon enough since it's usually too soon.

Now there's a giant, comma-shaped storm named Alberto going by offshore.

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Florida man with little engineering knowledge but a healthy fear of hurricanes creates ground anchors for shipping container:

ship-contain-anchor-hole.jpg

Just add leftover cement...

ship-contain-anchor.jpg

I still have to bury it and let the damn sandspurs grow back.

There's one at each corner and giant chains and load binders that go to the top corners of the container. Assuming my anchors are stronger than the chain, it's the weak link. Working load limit of 11,200 lbs. So I hope that anchor is strong enough to snap such a chain.

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On 4/10/2018 at 5:15 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

And bake it at close to 200 degrees in August, I'd guess. Not good. So it turned white and is getting a corrugated roof this week.

As you get into the tropics, sometimes "this week" means "Soon, mon."

It turns out that 10' corrugated panels are pretty much contraband in FL. Had I known, I would have bought twelve footers and cut them. But it turns out that it is possible to (slowly) have them shipped from another state.

Roofing in FL in June is a lot less pleasant than it would have been in April but we got the new wingsail on top yesterday.

ShipContainRoofing.jpg

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Did you put in the AE flood zone (1/100 chance of flooding in a given year) or the X zone (undetermined chance of flooding).  Or does the creek give a shit where the line is?

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8 hours ago, Fat Point Jack said:

Did you put in the AE flood zone (1/100 chance of flooding in a given year) or the X zone (undetermined chance of flooding).  Or does the creek give a shit where the line is?

It's for rebuilding supplies. If a storm comes that pushes enough water up the creek to present a problem for the container, there won't be anything else left to rebuild anyway.

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