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“In fraud we trust”

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Accused “In fraud we trust” kingpin arrested while vacationing in Thailand

Police reportedly seize 100,000 bitcoins, valued at nearly $840 million.

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Sergey Medvedev, 31, was co-founder of Infraud, a massive enterprise that acted something like an eBay for criminal buyers and sellers, prosecutors said in a federal indictment unsealed Wednesday. In 2015, he reportedly became Infraud's top-ranking administrator when alleged founder Svyatoslav Bondarenko stopped posting to forums under unexplained circumstances. Prosecutors said the group's tag line was "In fraud we trust." Justice Department officials said on Wednesday that Medvedev had been arrested but provided no other details.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/02/accused-in-fraud-we-trust-kingpin-arrested-while-vacationing-in-thailand/

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5 hours ago, Point Break said:

I didn't say it was not possible to resolve. Its simply not true.

It means food will not stick while cooking with it; nothing to do with affixing advert stickers, that's what Goof Off or Goo Gone is for!  The crib carries a CRC Citrus Degreaser, CRC# 14170, which will remove the stickiest sticky back glue from stickers like that or vinyl sign material.  Just have to let it sit on in for 10 or 29 seconds.

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On ‎2‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 7:36 PM, Mid said:

Accused “In fraud we trust” kingpin arrested while vacationing in Thailand

Police reportedly seize 100,000 bitcoins, valued at nearly $840 million.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/02/accused-in-fraud-we-trust-kingpin-arrested-while-vacationing-in-thailand/

So this was kind of like the Silk Road guy, then?

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38 minutes ago, Point Break said:

You guys really don’t recognize that the pan meme is a joke?      :mellow:

Yes, but not a very funny one. I hadn't yet got to the fill it with gasoline and light it off reply.

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PB, it's the only funny thing in this thread, but then you and I are more highly evolved. The definitive answer has to come from Snaggy.

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19 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

PB, it's the only funny thing in this thread, but then you and I are more highly evolved. The definitive answer has to come from Snaggy.

Copy that.....:lol:

We'll have to wait and see what he has to say.......(Snags is a he....yes?).....I wait with bated breath...............

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41 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Yes, but not a very funny one. I hadn't yet got to the fill it with gasoline and light it off reply.

"Funny" is in the eye of the beholder..............perhaps its too subtle for the unwashed masses in SA?

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2 hours ago, Point Break said:

"Funny" is in the eye of the beholder..............perhaps its too subtle for the unwashed masses in SA?

Speak for yourself. I'm a thoroughly washed mass.

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On 2/14/2018 at 11:30 PM, billy backstay said:

It means food will not stick while cooking with it; nothing to do with affixing advert stickers, that's what Goof Off or Goo Gone is for!  The crib carries a CRC Citrus Degreaser, CRC# 14170, which will remove the stickiest sticky back glue from stickers like that or vinyl sign material.  Just have to let it sit on in for 10 or 29 seconds.

When I was building commuter rail cars at the local GE plant, we just used MEK to clean everything, no MDS, no gloves, etc.  Probably explains a lot of my behavior more than 40 years later.  That shit gives a great buzz but the monster headache afterward always sucked.  By the way, never weld near an open container of it.  Just don't, OK?

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1 hour ago, Ed Lada said:

When I was building commuter rail cars at the local GE plant, we just used MEK to clean everything, no MDS, no gloves, etc.  Probably explains a lot of my behavior more than 40 years later.  That shit gives a great buzz but the monster headache afterward always sucked.  By the way, never weld near an open container of it.  Just don't, OK?

Yeah we used to rinse or clean our hands with Acetone, after painting boat bottoms, or working with fiberglass resins, never wore gloves.   Now, I wear gloves just to open boxes from the UPS truck.  Sometimes the nasty crud from inside the aluminum box trucks will get on my inner forearms, and make a nasty rash temporarily.

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22 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Yeah we used to rinse or clean our hands with Acetone, after painting boat bottoms, or working with fiberglass resins, never wore gloves.   Now, I wear gloves just to open boxes from the UPS truck.  Sometimes the nasty crud from inside the aluminum box trucks will get on my inner forearms, and make a nasty rash temporarily.

Yeah no glove days....we used to use a cleaner/solvent it was simply labeled #5 Cleaner...no other writing on the label...we bought it from Pilgrims Permacoat in Tampa....same place we bought 30 lbs bags of asbestos.....   :-)

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45 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Yeah we used to rinse or clean our hands with Acetone, after painting boat bottoms, or working with fiberglass resins, never wore gloves.   Now, I wear gloves just to open boxes from the UPS truck.  Sometimes the nasty crud from inside the aluminum box trucks will get on my inner forearms, and make a nasty rash temporarily.

Had a small private jet crash through the roof of an industrial building near the airport. What a sight...pulled up and here is the tail of the plane sticking out through the roof in the middle of the building!! Anyway, on its way through the roof it severed lots of service lines running through the drop ceiling space, not the least of which were large domestic water lines some for the sprinkler system, some for other industrial purposes and the water was just raining down in the room the jet wound up in, and running down the hallway and out the door about 4-6 inches deep. Hardly any fire but plenty of smoke and the electrical was out so the whole building was dark. So we're crawling down the hallway toward the place the jet was in in the dark through the rushing water. What we didn't know right away was that there was a considerable amount of jet fuel from the ruptured tanks on the jet floating on the top of the water we were crawling though. Couldn't smell it of course as we had breathing apparatus on but as we were soon soaked through with the water, I could feel it had a slippery oily kind of feel to it under the turnouts up against the skin. So......long story short, we put the thing out, the people aboard were deader than beaver hats so there was no rescue (had to cut the bodies out anyway), secured the water supply to the building and went outside to get a new air bottle and go back in when we noticed we were absolutely soaked to the skin with jet fuel. Well..............turns out that stuff gives you quite a rash...........everywhere...............eventually a few of us got transported to the hospital as the rash got worse (after being stripped in the parking lot and hosed down with tank water from one of the engines). No real damage but I itched for DAYS.......ALL OVER.........especially the crotch and butt crack.........especially............:blink: 

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Maybe a little TMI at the end there, but a great story!

By the way, do you remember the days before universal precautions when you were a paramedic?  I have a good touch and I hated the feeling of the gloves when I was trying to find a vein to start an IV, so back in the day, it was bare hands.  Blood washes off, right?   I had a friend that was a medic back then and he ended up with a medical retirement for hepatitis C after some years.  

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9 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Maybe a little TMI at the end there, but a great story!

By the way, do you remember the days before universal precautions when you were a paramedic?  I have a good touch and I hated the feeling of the gloves when I was trying to find a vein to start an IV, so back in the day, it was bare hands.  Blood washes off, right?   I had a friend that was a medic back then and he ended up with a medical retirement for hepatitis C after some years.  

 

My Dentist is probably close to 70, and doesn't use gloves sometimes, and no mask ever.  His 30-something daughter-partner OTOH,always has total PPE on everywhere possible.

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1 minute ago, Ed Lada said:

Maybe a little TMI at the end there, but a great story!

By the way, do you remember the days before universal precautions when you were a paramedic?  I have a good touch and I hated the feeling of the gloves when I was trying to find a vein to start an IV, so back in the day, it was bare hands.  Blood washes off, right?   I had a friend that was a medic back then and he ended up with a medical retirement for hepatitis C after some years.  

Oh man......I graduated from Paramedic School in 1978. We didn't use gloves for anything except people who were exceedingly gross....you know poop things and open weeping sores on street people, stuff like that. I have been literally soaked with blood from back in those days. Sprayed in the face with blood smeared on my hands and arms.......we really didn't worry about universal precautions at all...mostly because they didn't really exist with the emphasis they do today. When AIDS was first "discovered" in the US and came to the attention of health care workers, it was early 1980's. I was working in an area with a very large gay population. I had been taking care of lots of gay men with various injuries/illnesses (there was one guy bleeding from his lacerated butthole who claimed as the answer to my "exactly how did this happen" favorite question...he claimed he was chasing his cat across his back yard naked and slipped on the wet grass landing right on an exposed sprinkler head. Okkkkkaaaaayyyyy right.........anyway when the whole health risk to health care folks was first explained to us (sitting in the training room of our local hospital) we all went pale thong about all the blood and body fluids we had been in contact with the past few years. I was scared shitless for months, almost a year in fact. We all got HIV and Hep tested and came back negative but they were not sure about the incubation period so we were retested every 6 months for a few years. We were worried not only about ourselves, but our wives and girlfriends with home we had been having unprotected sex and our kids who we lived with and cared for in the normal course of having kids. Back then the thought was AIDS could be spread through even casual contact with saliva on intact skin. Now we now its a lot harder to get than that but it was pretty scary at first. We had a number of folks come down with Hep C over the years and one guy die of HIV but we didn't keep exposure records at the beginning so nobody could tie it to a specific exposure. And frankly the guy who died of HIV had what we judged to be a questionable "lifestyle" so to this day I'm not sure he didn't acquire it "off duty".

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1 minute ago, billy backstay said:

 

My Dentist is probably close to 70, and doesn't use gloves sometimes, and no mask ever.  His 30-something daughter-partner OTOH,always has total PPE on everywhere possible.

When I first worked in the ER, We never wore gloves unless it was a sterile procedure.  Then they came out with the 'universal precautions', which required gloves at a minimum if you were going to come in contact with body fluids.  After a while. gloving up became routine, but I always hated the lack of sensitivity from the glove, even surgical gloves which are tighter and thinner than the exam gloves.  Forget the nitrile gloves, (because nowadays it's cool to have a latex allergy to go with your gluten intolerance).  Those things feel like you have garbage bags on your hands.

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5 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

My Dentist is probably close to 70, and doesn't use gloves sometimes, and no mask ever.  His 30-something daughter-partner OTOH,always has total PPE on everywhere possible.

I would not let any health care provider who didn't wear PPE even touch me nowadays. If you allow him to do that you are placing yourself at considerable risk. I'd rethink him as my dentist if I were you........

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2 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Oh man......I graduated from Paramedic School in 1978. We didn't use gloves for anything except people who were exceedingly gross....you know poop things and open weeping sores on street people, stuff like that. I have been literally soaked with blood from back in those days. Sprayed in the face with blood smeared on my hands and arms.......we really didn't worry about universal precautions at all...mostly because they didn't really exist with the emphasis they do today. When AIDS was first "discovered" in the US and came to the attention of health care workers, it was early 1980's. I was working in an area with a very large gay population. I had been taking care of lots of gay men with various injuries/illnesses (there was one guy bleeding from his lacerated butthole who claimed as the answer to my "exactly how did this happen" favorite question...he claimed he was chasing his cat across his back yard naked and slipped on the wet grass landing right on an exposed sprinkler head. Okkkkkaaaaayyyyy right.........anyway when the whole health risk to health care folks was first explained to us (sitting in the training room of our local hospital) we all went pale thong about all the blood and body fluids we had been in contact with the past few years. I was scared shitless for months, almost a year in fact. We all got HIV and Hep tested and came back negative but they were not sure about the incubation period so we were retested every 6 months for a few years. We were worried not only about ourselves, but our wives and girlfriends with home we had been having unprotected sex and our kids who we lived with and cared for in the normal course of having kids. Back then the thought was AIDS could be spread through even casual contact with saliva on intact skin. Now we now its a lot harder to get than that but it was pretty scary at first. We had a number of folks come down with Hep C over the years and one guy die of HIV but we didn't keep exposure records at the beginning so nobody could tie it to a specific exposure. And frankly the guy who died of HIV had what we judged to be a questionable "lifestyle" so to this day I'm not sure he didn't acquire it "off duty".

In the Army we had mandatory HIV testing every year, so after the first year, I wasn't too worried anymore.  I still worry about Hep C.

When I started in the ER, it was the same, getting covered with blood on occasion.  One time we had a kid that had lacerated is lip pretty bad and a little artery was pumping away.  I was holding direct pressure on the lip for a time, and the doc told me to take my hand away and see if the bleeding had stopped.  I took my hand off and a nice arc of arterial blood went about 2 feet through the air and right down the front of my nicely starched medic whites.  The doc ended up tying off the artery. A few years later when I worked in a trauma center, we were in full battle rattle.  Gowns, mask, full face shield, gloves, shoe covers.  We wore scrubs instead of medic whites or BDUs.  Sometimes after the patient either went to the OR or the morgue (Or in the rare case, out into a normal ER bed.), the trauma room looked like a slaughterhouse.  You had to kind of shuffle walk, otherwise you would slip on the blood and fall on your ass.

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1 minute ago, Ed Lada said:

In the Army we had mandatory HIV testing every year, so after the first year, I wasn't too worried anymore.  I still worry about Hep C.

When I started in the ER, it was the same, getting covered with blood on occasion.  One time we had a kid that had lacerated is lip pretty bad and a little artery was pumping away.  I was holding direct pressure on the lip for a time, and the doc told me to take my hand away and see if the bleeding had stopped.  I took my hand off and a nice arc of arterial blood went about 2 feet through the air and right down the front of my nicely starched medic whites.  The doc ended up tying off the artery. A few years later when I worked in a trauma center, we were in full battle rattle.  Gowns, mask, full face shield, gloves, shoe covers.  We wore scrubs instead of medic whites or BDUs.  Sometimes after the patient either went to the OR or the morgue (Or in the rare case, out into a normal ER bed.), the trauma room looked like a slaughterhouse.  You had to kind of shuffle walk, otherwise you would slip on the blood and fall on your ass.

Most all of my facial "sprays" were from head/facial/nasal/oral trauma where the blood was running down in or over the nose and mouth. When the patient tried to speak or even breath they sprayed fine droplets of blood/saliva for a ways. So if you're sitting in the crushed car with them starting IV's and providing care while the truckers cut them out of the car because they are trapped, you are in VERY close prolonged proximity without much chance of avoiding the "spray". Once in a while when positive pressure ventilating patients who were not breathing but bleeding profusely that would result in the aerosolized bloody spray as well. Not sure I ever had an arterial bleed get near my face though, I managed to avoid most of those and they land on the uniforms or turnouts instead. Of course when you go to wipe the sweat out of your eyes or off your forehead and forget your hand/forearm has blood on it......that always makes for fun face painting!! Of course I never got feces sprayed on my face or wiped my head with feces on my hands/arms.......funny how you manage to remember to avoid that!!!!!! :lol:

I know what you mean about the floor......I have slipped and fallen in the back of many ambulances because of a blood covered floor! Thats just plain icky..........:blink:

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13 hours ago, Point Break said:

WD40 will remove any sticker or glue on the planet. Easy. 

I discovered this remarkable fact as a teenager and have been using it for that purpose ever since.

My parents worked for the space program back when it was a secret new substance. All the engineers used to steal some and they found lots of uses for it. For some reason, people still use it as a lubricant too.

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2 hours ago, billy backstay said:

WD40 - "Water Dry, 40th test recipe"

Wasn't that to keep rockets from corroding? I use that stuff lie some people use Windex. IOW, for just about everything. A hammer and duct tape, and I'm pretty much fully prepared.

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10 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Wasn't that to keep rockets from corroding? I use that stuff lie some people use Windex. IOW, for just about everything. A hammer and duct tape, and I'm pretty much fully prepared.

Putty and Paint!  Make it what it Aint!

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16 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

In the Army we had mandatory HIV testing every year, so after the first year, I wasn't too worried anymore.  I still worry about Hep C.

When I started in the ER, it was the same, getting covered with blood on occasion.  One time we had a kid that had lacerated is lip pretty bad and a little artery was pumping away.  I was holding direct pressure on the lip for a time, and the doc told me to take my hand away and see if the bleeding had stopped.  I took my hand off and a nice arc of arterial blood went about 2 feet through the air and right down the front of my nicely starched medic whites.  The doc ended up tying off the artery. A few years later when I worked in a trauma center, we were in full battle rattle.  Gowns, mask, full face shield, gloves, shoe covers.  We wore scrubs instead of medic whites or BDUs.  Sometimes after the patient either went to the OR or the morgue (Or in the rare case, out into a normal ER bed.), the trauma room looked like a slaughterhouse.  You had to kind of shuffle walk, otherwise you would slip on the blood and fall on your ass.

91B 1970

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19 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

91B 1970

Shit, you are old!  My first enlistment in the Army was in 1974-'76, 94D, baker, and also did 94B, diet cook and 91F, diet cook .  I went back in in 1988 in mental health 91G (now 68X), and I spent a lot of my free time in the ER doing medical work.

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23 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Sometimes after the patient either went to the OR or the morgue (Or in the rare case, out into a normal ER bed.), the trauma room looked like a slaughterhouse.  You had to kind of shuffle walk, otherwise you would slip on the blood and fall on your ass.

You mean something like this? Nurse friend of mine sent this lamenting the demanding crowds for the flu season..............

26992395_368212570309774_4856525440790713067_n.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Point Break said:

You mean something like this? Nurse friend of mine sent this lamenting the demanding crowds for the flu season..............

26992395_368212570309774_4856525440790713067_n.jpg

true that ,

you know you're in trouble when ER staff start running ..........................

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46 minutes ago, Point Break said:

You mean something like this? Nurse friend of mine sent this lamenting the demanding crowds for the flu season..............

26992395_368212570309774_4856525440790713067_n.jpg

I just had a flashback!   

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59 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

I just had a flashback!   

disturbing...there was a trash can by the door labeled  ..Body Parts 

IMG_0004.jpg

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7 hours ago, Point Break said:

Here's our version...............:lol:

 

shoot-589521.jpg

Holy moly. That's a wet mess right there. I've never dealt with a human shit show. I  have dealt with cattle issues that would make that look small but they weren't people. I have the luxury of pulling out a .45 and saying, "It's FUBAR", and ending it.Then I just cry for a week. I just did it a few weeks ago for the first time in years (busted leg from slipping on ice.) I'll never stop thinking about it.

Thank the stars it's not often.

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I'm sure glad you aren't an ambulance crew member! :D

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12 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I'm sure glad you aren't an ambulance crew member! :D

I couldn't do it. I'm staring at that picture...No way. I'm too small. It's haunting.

The stuff just strewn around shows how much desperation was going on. I can't do that. I can do it when it's fun but that doesn't look fun. That looks brutal.

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On 2/18/2018 at 6:22 AM, billy backstay said:

WD40 - "Water Dry, 40th test recipe"

Engineers can't use words like that. That's the result you want but not actually what happens.

It was the 40th attempt at a water displacer from what I heard.

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8 hours ago, Point Break said:

Hey sail blue.....what was a 91B MOS back in 70?

These were the medical MOS codes back in the day....odd I don't see Lab tech in the list...I was friends with a few...
everyone starts as 91 A after graduating from AIT (Advanced Individual Training)
91A Medical Corpsman 
91B Medical NCO 
91C Practical Nurse 
91D Operating Room Specialist 
91E Dental Specialist 
91F Psychiatric Specialist 
91G Behavioral Science Specialist 
91H Social Work Specialist 
91J Physical Therapy Specialist 
91K Physical Reconditioning Specialist 
91L Occupational Therapy Specialist 
91M Electroencephalograph Specialist 
91N Cardiac Specialist 
91P Radiology Specialist 
91Q Pharmacy Specialist 
91R Veterinary Food Inspection Specialist 
91S Preventive Medicine Specialist 
91T Animal Care Specialist 
91U "Ear, Nose, And Throat Specialist" 
91V Respiratory Specialist 
91W Nuclear Medicine Specialist 
91Y Eye Specialist 
91Z Medical Senior Sergeant 

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Yup. water displacement test #40

Friend’s Dad “invented” the little red straw that comes with it.

The guy wasn’t smart enough to come up with a decent holder for it, though...

I’ve used it to remove tough automotive lube and oils from carpeting among a million other things

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Yup. water displacement test #40

Friend’s Dad “invented” the little red straw that comes with it.

The guy wasn’t smart enough to come up with a decent holder for it, though...

I’ve used it to remove tough automotive lube and oils from carpeting among a million other things

 

We stock a CRC spray called "Knocker Loose", which has similar properties to WD40.

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4 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Engineers can't use words like that. That's the result you want but not actually what happens.

It was the 40th attempt at a water displacer from what I heard.

The name came from Water Displacer - 40th Formulation.

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17 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The name came from Water Displacer - 40th Formulation.

Yep...my father remarried a women whose first  husband was with them from the start ,San Diego as I recall ...she told stories of him traveling all over SoCal trying to sell the product to local hardware store owners....he ended up with a huge territory and became very wealthy

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On 2/17/2018 at 12:24 PM, billy backstay said:

Yeah we used to rinse or clean our hands with Acetone, after painting boat bottoms, or working with fiberglass resins, never wore gloves.   Now, I wear gloves just to open boxes from the UPS truck.  Sometimes the nasty crud from inside the aluminum box trucks will get on my inner forearms, and make a nasty rash temporarily.

Reminds me of the time the scaffold boards collapsed while I was running around a boat with a full paint tray of Smiths penetrating epoxy... spilled it down my chest to my ankles. Bad right? I knew that at the time, 1984. My brilliant first aid response was to strip my clothes while running for the 55 gallon drum of acetone. poured buckets of that over chest and body. Problem solved. It was cold though...

Had to explain to my wife why I had driven home naked too.

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When I was about 20 I was helping with fiberglass layup and got a small splatter of catalyzed polyester resin in my eye and it was very uncomfortable...a Cuban co worker barked in his best English...acetone..acetone...Oh gawd...I quickly realized I had to do something and he seemed to know...it did stop the burning but the acetone was extremely uncomfortable but not burning ....flushed with plenty of water then dealt with a very raw eye. Fast forward about 10 years when my wife and I were building a 24  footer...I was doing something on the floor as she was rolling Gel coat on the underside of the cabin top, I turned my head and looked up to say something to her and caught a drop of gel coat in my eye....I knew just what to do

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7 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

Yep...my father remarried a women whose first  husband was with them from the start ,San Diego as I recall ...she told stories of him traveling all over SoCal trying to sell the product to local hardware store owners....he ended up with a huge territory and became very wealthy

place is still in the same spot as forever

I ride past it almost daily

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On 2/18/2018 at 6:33 AM, billy backstay said:

Putty and Paint!  Make it what it Aint!

Cut to size.  Beat to fit.  Paint to match.

Remodeler's mantra.

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3 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Cut to size.  Beat to fit.  Paint to match.

Remodeler's mantra.

Bash to fit, bog to fair, paint to match. Shipwright's version.  In the old days it was "in glue and dust we place our trust".

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13 hours ago, familysailor said:

Reminds me of the time the scaffold boards collapsed while I was running around a boat with a full paint tray of Smiths penetrating epoxy... spilled it down my chest to my ankles. Bad right? I knew that at the time, 1984. My brilliant first aid response was to strip my clothes while running for the 55 gallon drum of acetone. poured buckets of that over chest and body. Problem solved. It was cold though...

Had to explain to my wife why I had driven home naked too.

And that's the story you came up with?

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1966 -67 Boeing 747 design group.  Lead engineer told me to add KIP HE WIS to specs on my drawing.  Kick in place, Hammer edges, Weld it shut.  At the I didn't think it was funny at thr time.   I've lightened up a bit since then.

 

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On 2/19/2018 at 11:13 PM, Recidivist said:

Bash to fit, bog to fair, paint to match. Shipwright's version.  In the old days it was "in glue and dust we place our trust".

Cut to fit, file to match, paint to hide.

USN.

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