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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
AmericanVagrant

Sold everything to sail the world...boat sunk on day 2

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http://www.tampabay.com/sold-everything-to-sail-the-world-boat-sank-next-day

Quote

MADEIRA BEACH — Tanner Broadwell and Nikki Walsh dreamed the same dream: Give up the rat race, go live on a sailboat, see the Caribbean, maybe the world.

They sold everything they owned in Colorado. Last year they bought a 28-foot sailboat in Alabama and headed for Tarpon Springs. They lived at the marina for months, getting the Lagniappe ready for their journey. They said their goodbyes on Tuesday and set sail for Key West.

The next day, the dream died in John’s Pass.

The Lagniappe sank Wednesday night while sailing into this fishing village-turned-tourist stop. Their former home sits capsized, within sight of the bars and restaurants. Their belongings floated off to who knows where.

Before they abandoned ship, Walsh grabbed their social security cards, some cash, his ID and her phone — and Remy, their 2-year-old Pug.

They have no jobs, no savings and nowhere to go.

"How do I have everything," Walsh said, "and end up in a s----- hotel with nothing?"

Walsh, 24, grew up in Philadelphia. She dreamed of living in a highrise. Then she met Broadwell.

The 26-year-old was from Cocoa Beach with a knack for selling. Their boss flew him to Philadelphia. They were friends at first, then they became more. He was sent to Breckinridge, Colo., to market timeshares.

"We got so tired of that lifestyle," he said, "of doing things to make people do the things they don’t want to do."

So they started saving their money. He Ubered. They spent two years planning, and then finally did it. They sold everything they owned, even his sport-utility vehicle. In April they bought a 1969 Columbia sailboat in Alabama for $5,000, then spent that much fixing the 49-year-old boat.

They named it the Lagniappe (pronounced lanny-yap), Creole for bonus. "Like the 13th donut in a dozen," Broadwell said. "It’s something extra for you."

They had no sailing experience. His father helped them sail along the Gulf Coast, from Alabama to Panama City. That’s how the couple learned how to sail.

They reached Tarpon Springs in May. They docked at Mar Marina, where Broadwell got a job. They worked on the hull, rewired the boat and got it ready for their journey.

"We met a bunch of good people," he said. "Everybody gave us a nice farewell off the docks."

They set sail Tuesday, anchoring off Anclote Key. The next day they passed by Clearwater Beach and made their way to John’s Pass to dock for the night.

Then it all went wrong.

It was about 8:45 p.m. when they sailed into a new port, navigating a channel they had never sailed before, in the dark, fog rolling in.

Broadwell steered while Walsh stood at the bow, lighting their path with a spotlight, trying to figure out the navigational buoys. But the red and green buoys seemed out of place, they said, and the shoal wasn’t where their 2016-17 navigational charts said it should be. Had Hurricane Irma altered the channel?

Then it happened: The Lagniappe struck something underwater. Walsh almost flew off the deck.

Waves rolled the sailboat. It dipped from side-to-side, almost going under. Broadwell realized the keel had been ripped off the bottom.

Water started to leak into the cabin. They put their life jackets on (Remy, too.) Walsh dialed Sea Tow, the AAA of the marine world.

"My hands are shaking," she said. "I know I probably sounded like a crazy person to them. I’m stuttering trying to talk to them.

"They said they would be there in 40 minutes. I thought ‘That is a long time to spend out here.’"

Walsh ran into the flooded cabin and grabbed what little she could. The crash had thrown their things onto the floor. Now their stuff was floating.

"I’m just standing there in awe," she said. "I just lost everything I ever owned. I see my things floating away and I can’t get to them."

Sea Tow arrived about an hour later, and just in time. The Lagniappe was sinking in about 9-feet of water and about to roll over. It was too shallow for the tow boat to approach and get them off the sailboat

Abandon ship. The couple had to jump into the water.

"I think you could sense our tragedy," Broadwell said. "I sold everything I had to do this, and I lost everything in a matter of 20 minutes."

The rest of the night is a blur. Stranded on the side of the road with no help, some cash and no credit cards. Broadwell’s mother found them an Uber driver kind enough to spend hours helping them find a cheap motel room.

Thursday morning, the cavalry started arriving.

"People came out of nowhere," Walsh said. "Everyone just started showing up to help us."

Their new friends in Tarpon Springs drove down to help. Broadwell’s mother arrived from Jacksonville.

They had no insurance. Nor will the Lagniappe ever sail again. It’s blue hull sticks out of the water in low tide.

In fact, the Coast Guard told the couple they need to get their boat out of there. It could cost up to $10,000 to remove and store it. They have about $90.

They lost everything save for the shirts on their backs — well, one shirt. Broadwell wasn’t wearing a shirt when he jumped ship.

"I woke up today and I was like ‘I don’t have that,’" he said Friday, "or anything I had."

They’re relying on family and friends right now to get by. They just got some new clothes and shoes from Walmart. They have no idea how they’ll pay to remove their boat, or even where they’ll live.

Broadwell said they didn’t have much to begin with. "Why do you think we wanted to live on a boat?"

They might stay with his mother, then float around the state looking for work. They’re still figuring it out. But they’re still alive, and so is the dream.

"I’m not going to give up now," Broadwell said. "I’m going to get another boat down the road."

"We can’t just give up on our dreams," Walsh said.

 

I'm not gonna hate...this is really sad. Even more so due to the extraction bill. Sure they made mistakes, but a keel getting torn off?

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Well....that sucks.

Can't quite remember where my credit card is at this point.....but once I track it down, I'll be sure to leave a sizeable donation to their "other people should fund our cruise" account.  I can't afford to spend my life cruising yet, but if enough of us pool together while we work, there's a chance that these slags could.... come on guys!

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Sigh. I can see why you wouldn't insure a $5000 boat - but what about the money they were planning to live off? I can see living on the boat to save money while you work someplace, but cannot understand cruising anywhere if you have no money.

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Poor divils.

But I think @12 metre has a point.  There are squillions of videos out there whose message seems to be that you can fix an old boat with no money, sail off with no sailing experience, and live off the cigarette trees and the lemonade springs.

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They were lucky.

They had the wrong boat and lack of experience. Now they have no boat, and some experience of how quickly things can go pear-shaped at sea.

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Quote

 

MADEIRA BEACH — Tanner Broadwell and Nikki Walsh dreamed the same dream: Give up the rat race, go live on a sailboat, see the Caribbean, maybe the world.
They sold everything they owned in Colorado. Last year they bought a 28-foot sailboat in Alabama and headed for Tarpon Springs. They lived at the marina for months, getting the Lagniappe ready for their journey. They said their goodbyes on Tuesday and set sail for Key West.

The next day, the dream died in John’s Pass.
The Lagniappe sank Wednesday night while sailing into this fishing village-turned-tourist stop. Their former home sits capsized, within sight of the bars and restaurants. Their belongings floated off to who knows where.
Before they abandoned ship, Walsh grabbed their social security cards, some cash, his ID and her phone — and Remy, their 2-year-old Pug.
They have no jobs, no savings and nowhere to go.
"How do I have everything," Walsh said, "and end up in a s----- hotel with nothing?"
Walsh, 24, grew up in Philadelphia. She dreamed of living in a highrise. Then she met Broadwell.
The 26-year-old was from Cocoa Beach with a knack for selling. Their boss flew him to Philadelphia. They were friends at first, then they became more. He was sent to Breckinridge, Colo., to market timeshares.
"We got so tired of that lifestyle," he said, "of doing things to make people do the things they don’t want to do."
So they started saving their money. He Ubered. They spent two years planning, and then finally did it. They sold everything they owned, even his sport-utility vehicle. In April they bought a 1969 Columbia sailboat in Alabama for $5,000, then spent that much fixing the 49-year-old boat.
They named it the Lagniappe (pronounced lanny-yap), Creole for bonus. "Like the 13th donut in a dozen," Broadwell said. "It’s something extra for you."
They had no sailing experience. His father helped them sail along the Gulf Coast, from Alabama to Panama City. That’s how the couple learned how to sail.
They reached Tarpon Springs in May. They docked at Mar Marina, where Broadwell got a job. They worked on the hull, rewired the boat and got it ready for their journey.
"We met a bunch of good people," he said. "Everybody gave us a nice farewell off the docks."
They set sail Tuesday, anchoring off Anclote Key. The next day they passed by Clearwater Beach and made their way to John’s Pass to dock for the night.
Then it all went wrong.
It was about 8:45 p.m. when they sailed into a new port, navigating a channel they had never sailed before, in the dark, fog rolling in.
roadwell steered while Walsh stood at the bow, lighting their path with a spotlight, trying to figure out the navigational buoys. But the red and green buoys seemed out of place, they said, and the shoal wasn’t where their 2016-17 navigational charts said it should be. Had Hurricane Irma altered the channel?
Then it happened: The Lagniappe struck something underwater. Walsh almost flew off the deck.
Waves rolled the sailboat. It dipped from side-to-side, almost going under. Broadwell realized the keel had been ripped off the bottom.
Water started to leak into the cabin. They put their life jackets on (Remy, too.) Walsh dialed Sea Tow, the AAA of the marine world.
"My hands are shaking," she said. "I know I probably sounded like a crazy person to them. I’m stuttering trying to talk to them.
"They said they would be there in 40 minutes. I thought ‘That is a long time to spend out here.’"
Walsh ran into the flooded cabin and grabbed what little she could. The crash had thrown their things onto the floor. Now their stuff was floating.
"I’m just standing there in awe," she said. "I just lost everything I ever owned. I see my things floating away and I can’t get to them."
Sea Tow arrived about an hour later, and just in time. The Lagniappe was sinking in about 9-feet of water and about to roll over. It was too shallow for the tow boat to approach and get them off the sailboat
Abandon ship. The couple had to jump into the water.
"I think you could sense our tragedy," Broadwell said. "I sold everything I had to do this, and I lost everything in a matter of 20 minutes."
The rest of the night is a blur. Stranded on the side of the road with no help, some cash and no credit cards. Broadwell’s mother found them an Uber driver kind enough to spend hours helping them find a cheap motel room.
Thursday morning, the cavalry started arriving.
"People came out of nowhere," Walsh said. "Everyone just started showing up to help us."
Their new friends in Tarpon Springs drove down to help. Broadwell’s mother arrived from Jacksonville.
They had no insurance. Nor will the Lagniappe ever sail again. It’s blue hull sticks out of the water in low tide.
In fact, the Coast Guard told the couple they need to get their boat out of there. It could cost up to $10,000 to remove and store it. They have about $90.
They lost everything save for the shirts on their backs — well, one shirt. Broadwell wasn’t wearing a shirt when he jumped ship.
"I woke up today and I was like ‘I don’t have that,’" he said Friday, "or anything I had."
They’re relying on family and friends right now to get by. They just got some new clothes and shoes from Walmart. They have no idea how they’ll pay to remove their boat, or even where they’ll live.
Broadwell said they didn’t have much to begin with. "Why do you think we wanted to live on a boat?"
They might stay with his mother, then float around the state looking for work. They’re still figuring it out. But they’re still alive, and so is the dream.
"I’m not going to give up now," Broadwell said. "I’m going to get another boat down the road."
"We can’t just give up on our dreams," Walsh said.

 

Yeah... That's quite a story...

 

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she wanted to live in a high rise

He sold dime bags to spring breakers at the beach

Then......

They sold everything they had...at a weekend yard sale

24 in out the door 26  n too tired to pick up stix.... yep they'd about had enough of the rat race...shit theyr young enuf to do this 3 or 4 more times

They shouldn't have named the boat after 13  something 

 they should trade that dog for food....if possible

Start working the press and hope for a book /movie deal Rocky Mountain Down

Certain places  ( especially at night for first time arriving novices)   should be avoided if the name sounds suspicious...like Matanzas Inlet.. Cape Fear...Cape Disappointment .. They should  should've taken a pass at Johns Pass... 

crashing at Moms and floating around the state....Ah it's so good to be young....

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3 hours ago, Zonker said:

Sigh. I can see why you wouldn't insure a $5000 boat - but what about the money they were planning to live off? I can see living on the boat to save money while you work someplace, but cannot understand cruising anywhere if you have no money.

This.

 

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Just read the story in today's Tampa Bay Times. A sad tale, but after reading, my reaction was, "What could possibly go wrong?" Old boat, little experience, at night going through unfamiliar inlet. Hit something to cause keel to depart? 

11411 Chart shows 10' through entrance and drawbridge, then 4' to ICW. Hindsight, Pass A  Grille much easier, and no shoaling

 

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They look young and fit. This is an easy fix: get a job, save some money, buy another boat, try again. Based on the BS write up you would think that this is a tragedy of some kind - it's a disappointment and a setback, but easily retrievable. The guys I feel sorry for are the old loaners who decide to do this when they are 70 and sink their boat along with all their stuff and their photos of the people who used to give a shit about them before they went curmudgeon and drove off their friends and family.

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1969 Columbia 28....

 

The first thing to go through my mind when I saw what boat they had was: did they check the keelbolts?

 

The answer is: obviously not!

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28 minutes ago, Wet Spreaders said:

They look young and fit. This is an easy fix: get a job, save some money, buy another boat, try again.

I don't think the state should give them another title or registration on a boat until that one is safely outside the environment.

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Darwin cheated again. It's part of millennial culture. People nowadays don't want to put a little time and preparation and effort to educate themselves even about basics.  'Oh that looks easy let's just do it'. It's why it takes 5.5 hours to play a round of golf now when it used to be 4.

Their safety net will be a gofundme page they will probably make $100k  and be on Good Mornjng America  

 

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Hmmm. 2 slobs from Philly, about 30 years old. Gave up the rat race. Good for them.

Time to get the bus back to Philly and get a couple of jobs. 

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34 minutes ago, qwerty57 said:

1969 Columbia 28....

 

The first thing to go through my mind when I saw what boat they had was: did they check the keelbolts?

 

The answer is: obviously not!

the first thing through my mind, was "you mean to tell me, you couldn't find a better, newer, nicer boat for $5000?"

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1 hour ago, Wet Spreaders said:

......................................... The guys I feel sorry for are the old loaners who decide to do this when they are 70 and sink their boat along with all their stuff and their photos of the people who used to give a shit about them before they went curmudgeon and drove off their friends and family.

Yes... reminds me of a time the day before a hurricane was to hit St Augustine some old guy in a classic wooden schooner missed the inlet and was on  Valano Beach...it was the calm before the storm day...high tide and his boat WAS floating broadside to the beach in about 6ft of water... I told him ..Do something NOW! but he was just in a state of shock or  IDK maybe just gave up already...next day the storm hit and all that was left of that boat was match sticks....that was sad

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1 hour ago, dacapo said:

the first thing through my mind, was "you mean to tell me, you couldn't find a better, newer, nicer boat for $5000?"

Totally got rooked on that deal for sure!

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Did the keel really come off?  Seems like they would need to be going faster than a C28 can go to actually separate it from the hull.  If it did then the bolts must have been pretty much done and it was just matter of time. Lucky to run it aground where help was nearby. 

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27 minutes ago, CruiserJim said:

Did the keel really come off?  Seems like they would need to be going faster than a C28 can go to actually separate it from the hull.  If it did then the bolts must have been pretty much done and it was just matter of time. Lucky to run it aground where help was nearby. 

I was just about to say, if it fell off that easy it's probably a good job it happened close to shore rather than offshore or something

It's all mud bottoms there right?

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8 hours ago, Gallagher said:

Well....that sucks.

Can't quite remember where my credit card is at this point.....but once I track it down, I'll be sure to leave a sizeable donation to their "other people should fund our cruise" account.  I can't afford to spend my life cruising yet, but if enough of us pool together while we work, there's a chance that these slags could.... come on guys!

That sarcasm is so thick and delicious you can cut it with a knife.

7 hours ago, Para Handy said:

They were lucky.

They had the wrong boat and lack of experience. Now they have no boat, and some experience of how quickly things can go pear-shaped at sea.

What's that they say about having to pay for the best lessons?  I've never forgot the lessons I've learned through epic fuck up.

3 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

They look young and fit. This is an easy fix: get a job, save some money, buy another boat, try again. Based on the BS write up you would think that this is a tragedy of some kind - it's a disappointment and a setback, but easily retrievable. The guys I feel sorry for are the old loaners who decide to do this when they are 70 and sink their boat along with all their stuff and their photos of the people who used to give a shit about them before they went curmudgeon and drove off their friends and family.

lol no shit!!  Fucking millennials are the laziest and most self-entitled of all the generations.  I weep for the future and I'm embarrassed to admit that I'm on the very early end of being a millennial.  Well, technically, I'm without a generation lost somewhere between GenX and millennial.  I didn't have a pot to piss in when I was 26 and I've had to work my ass off to get to the point where I'm even thinking about buying a cruising boat.  Cruising should be a goal, not an escape.

 

 

I can't wait to read the dickhead comments after I sink my boat!  Should make for good entertainment :D

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I know that pass. Like all passes in Fl, the sandbars shift regularly, each storm or cold front. The markers only suggest where the channel was, when they were placed. If you don't know the pass, don't go in at night. Charts are nearly useless. 

On a 49 year old boat, checking keel bolts is more important than fitting solar panels and other crap.  They made nearly every mistake possible, #1 probably thinking that it's easy and cheap. 

 

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1 hour ago, fastyacht said:

Totally got rooked on that deal for sure!

They may have paid less, and had $5K invested after 'fixing' it up.

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8 hours ago, Zonker said:

Sigh. I can see why you wouldn't insure a $5000 boat - but what about the money they were planning to live off? I can see living on the boat to save money while you work someplace, but cannot understand cruising anywhere if you have no money.

If everything I owned was tied up in that $5K boat, you better believe I'd insure it.

And don't get me started about coming into an unfamiliar port, at night, in fog, without wearing PDFs, let alone being on the bow in those circumstances. The stupid is strong with these two.

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1 hour ago, alctel said:

I was just about to say, if it fell off that easy it's probably a good job it happened close to shore rather than offshore or something

It's all mud bottoms there right?

sand

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8 hours ago, savoir said:

And the moral is . . . . .  never enter a strange port at night.

Or motor at WOT in reduced visibility and in unfamiliar areas.

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21 minutes ago, NautiGirl said:

If everything I owned was tied up in that $5K boat, you better believe I'd insure it.

And don't get me started about coming into an unfamiliar port, at night, in fog, without wearing PDFs, let alone being on the bow in those circumstances. The stupid is strong with these two.

Stupid is a strong word... they were greatly inexperienced, followed a couple of vlogs and were led to believe it was cheap and easy. Probably see more of that in future...wages are stagnant, housing (both rental and purchase) ridiculously expensive, and old boats cheap as dirt. I'm surprised that more people don't fall into the trap.

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2 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

all the passes on the west coast of Florida are tricky...especially the smaller ones 

 

john p.jpg

They said the channel markers didn't seem to be in the right place...LOL... yeah if you are not in the channel....my guess is they were fixated on the bridge and heading for that....as you can see the channel is not 90 degrees to the bridge.....that said navigating the open draw with current running strong at an angle to the opening is always touch and go especially with under powered boats

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Hilarious!  They got off very cheaply.  Same thing could have happened with a far more expensive boat.  Lessons learned?  Maybe.  Insurance is not the answer to their ignorance.

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8 hours ago, Para Handy said:

They were lucky.

They had the wrong boat and lack of experience. Now they have no boat, and some experience of how quickly things can go pear-shaped at sea.

On the bright side, it seems like they didn't lose much.   They had almost nothing, it seems.  Maybe they were fortunate to lose the keel under those circumstances and not in a more dangerous setting.

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23 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

They said the channel markers didn't seem to be in the right place...LOL... yeah if you are not in the channel....my guess is they were fixated on the bridge and heading for that....as you can see the channel is not 90 degrees to the bridge.....that said navigating the open draw with current running strong at an angle to the opening is always touch and go especially with under powered boats

It's very likely the channel shifted, esp following Irma. Usually they shift to the south. Haven't been out Johns Pass since the storms, but going out later today or tomorrow. 

Went in New Pass in a mini-ton a few decades ago following a night race. Waited offshore until sunrise. Good thing, as channel had shifted a hundred yards south of the markers, which had waves breaking over them. Still caught one big one that filled the cockpit and buried the boat. Close call and a wild ride.

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6 minutes ago, RKoch said:

It's very likely the channel shifted, esp following Irma. Usually they shift to the south. Haven't been out Johns Pass since the storms, but going out later today or tomorrow. 

Went in New Pass in a mini-ton a few decades ago following a night race. Waited offshore until sunrise. Good thing, as channel had shifted a hundred yards south of the markers, which had waves breaking over them. Still caught one big one that filled the cockpit and buried the boat. Close call and a wild ride.

if you are able take some photos.....

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Just now, SailBlueH2O said:

if you are able take some photos.....

If it's still there, I'll try to get a couple pics. Might just be a mast sticking up.

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Here is a good example...this is Longboat Pass near where H2O lives. The shoreline drift of sand from north builds up an outer bar. Tidal currents carve out a channel to the south. Eventually it will hook around parallel to the shore. As the bar shoals up, eventually a swash channel opens up on the north side, right next to the shore.  When the Army Corps dredges these passes, they just go straight out, which is fighting against the natural pattern.Longboat_Pass_3_18_111%20%2002a2.jpg

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7 minutes ago, RKoch said:

Here is a good example...this is Longboat Pass near where H2O lives. The shoreline drift of sand from north builds up an outer bar. Tidal currents carve out a channel to the south. Eventually it will hook around parallel to the shore. As the bar shoals up, eventually a swash channel opens up on the north side, right next to the shore.  When the Army Corps dredges these passes, they just go straight out, which is fighting against the natural pattern.Longboat_Pass_3_18_111%20%2002a2.jpg

I had not been over the Longboat Pass bridge in a while, until a few weeks ago...on the south end of the bridge (left) the sand has built up under the bridge and with in feet of Toms dock....great photo BTW w/ dredge in pass....

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4 hours ago, CruiserJim said:

Did the keel really come off?  Seems like they would need to be going faster than a C28 can go to actually separate it from the hull.  If it did then the bolts must have been pretty much done and it was just matter of time. Lucky to run it aground where help was nearby. 

Really good point

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27788320_10156248985831579_2707924348665Wind was light Wednesday evening. It's been warm and humid the past 5 or so days, so a bit of evening fog.  Even motoring at hull speed (which they shouldn't have been doing if they were unsure of channel) the keel would have withstood bouncing on a sandbar. With our shallow water, it's not uncommon to hit bottom once in a while. I'm agreeing with the bad keel bolts theory. 49 year old boat, and it likely never occurred to them to check them.  Here is a pic from the paper...ill be out there in a couple hours, I'll grab a photo if there's anything there to See.

 

 

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Addendum:

Story in paper says they spent $5K buying boat, same amount working on it. Guy says they rewired  it and 'worked on hull'. No further details. Supposedly they only have $90 between them. They weren't going to get far on that, not sure what their plan was...if they had one. I'm not going to rag on them for being newbies, but it does appear they didn't have a clue, did little research and learning, no money to fund their cruising, and were naively optimistic dreamers. It's a story that gets repeated, and will continue to be.

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When I was 11 or so, my family joined with the owner's family and the 9 of us brought a Columbia 28 boat back from Mackinac.  The thing I remember about the boat was two quarter berths.  Atomic 4 so we were stopping for gas every other port.  My youthful memory is that the boat was pretty well constructed. 

Stupid end to a decent boat and I'm glad they survived but very stupid.

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Good find JoeO. Several thousand miles in Lake Lanier? That lake is a snooze fest and it would take forever to rack up that kind of mileage at Lanier. You might log more miles bobbing up and down in the wakes of the go-fast Cigarette boats that greatly outnumber sailboats.

    Here what that same site says of the Columbia 28 keel bolts. Sounds like they are simple lag bolts so it wouldn't have taken much (yeah right it it a boat remember...) to remove the originals and tap in the next size up. As long as you use diesel to lube the process as it says!

Like most Columbias (and any older boat) you need to check for rotted bulkheads from leaks at the chainplates, soft spots in the deck - especially where bolts or other hardware go through the fiberglass and into the wood core.

One C-28 Mk II owner and his surveyor found "substantial wet rot" in the mast compression post located between the keelson and the interior floorboards. He had to replace it. He advises all C-28 owners to inspect closely, as the post sits in the bilge, and may be wet most of the time.

Like many older fin keel boats, some C-28 owners have had to replace corroded keel bolts. Here is some info on the bolts for this boat from a manual dated January 1972.

There are seven keel bolts. These are lag bolts installed from the top. (3/4" DIA X 9" LG LAG STUD. DRILL .656" DIA X 5" DEEP USING C-28 KEEL ATTACHMENT JIG FOR POSITIONING HOLES. USE LAG END OF STUD AS TAP TO THREAD KEEL. APPLY KEROSENE TO HOLE AND STUD DURING TAPPING OPERATION. USE CAM-TYPE STUD DRIVER. LEAVE 4" MIN. OF STUD PROTRUDING FROM TOP OF KEEL. - 7 REQUIRED.)

Also concerning the nuts: 3/4" NC HEX NUT & 3/4" ID X 2" OD PLAIN WASHER - HOT DIP GALV STEEL DRILL 13/16" DIA THRU HULL USING SAME KEEL ATTACMENT JIG FOR POSITIONING HOLES AS IS USED TO DRILL KEEL. (SEE DETAIL) - 7 PLACES

Here is some more information from an owner.

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39 minutes ago, RKoch said:

Addendum: ...Supposedly they only have $90 between them. They weren't going to get far on that, not sure what their plan was...

He was going to pimp out her skanky ass.

 

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11 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

The chick is wearing a La Vag t-shirt.

27658120_10155829346415306_6433097456059

Yes, looks like they were planning on using her puppies puppy to make money online.

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6 minutes ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

he's got the dirtbag teeth, she's got the pearly whites

 

not surprised by the colorado part.

He has real teeth.

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5 hours ago, Tempest said:
8 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

They look young and fit. This is an easy fix: get a job, save some money, buy another boat, try again. Based on the BS write up you would think that this is a tragedy of some kind - it's a disappointment and a setback, but easily retrievable. The guys I feel sorry for are the old loaners who decide to do this when they are 70 and sink their boat along with all their stuff and their photos of the people who used to give a shit about them before they went curmudgeon and drove off their friends and family.

lol no shit!!  Fucking millennials are the laziest and most self-entitled of all the generations.  I weep for the future and I'm embarrassed to admit that I'm on the very early end of being a millennial.  Well, technically, I'm without a generation lost somewhere between GenX and millennial.  I didn't have a pot to piss in when I was 26 and I've had to work my ass off to get to the point where I'm even thinking about buying a cruising boat.  Cruising should be a goal, not an escape.

 

 

I can't wait to read the dickhead comments after I sink my boat!  Should make for good entertainment :D

 

You're already levelled up three or four times above these people. I suspect that if you end up sinking a boat, it will be for some much better reason than "we didn't know anything could go wrong and went into a treacherous location with a questionable boat" and unfortunately it's likely that you'll be in a much more interesting place.

I noticed that nobody commented on the warm water being their real savior. If they had done this further north or on the West Coast, they'd both likely died from hypothermia. Their mistake was on the level of that Morning Dew jerk whose widow successfully sued the USCG.

FB- Doug

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11 minutes ago, random said:

He has real teeth.

The guy looks like if he could make it to Key West he could make a living doing Ricky Gervais impersonations.

Image result for Ricky Gervais   image.png.1fee1ee13fd88f5461efd2127471603e.png

 

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Didn't make it out :(. Helped friend measure up for new halyards and a couple other minor chores. Headed out canal, got to bridge, and starting under bridge the temp alarm went off. Made a quick U-turn, apologized to bridge tender over vhf (explained situation). He was cool. Sailed back up canal and drifted into slip. Checked raw water filter, tightened a belt, was idling motor and watching sunset. Everything fine. Then just before killing motor and closing up boat the temp alarm went off again. I told friend it was likely the raw water pump impeller, but need to check thruhull to make sure it's not obstructed (seacock  did operate freely). So never made it out as far as sunk boat. Guy in slip next door said he was out yesterday, and it wasn't visible.

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15 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

The chick is wearing a La Vag t-shirt.

27658120_10155829346415306_6433097456059

And she dreamed of one day living in a high rise. Beats the trailer I guess.

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Rasper's right, that guy looks just like Ricky Gervais!

The story said Walsh "dialed Sea Tow." It's great they had tow insurance, well done, but I hope they were not relying on cell phone coverage alone for comms. If so, not well done.

Koch is right (and others). Keel bolts must have been waiting for any little reason. As for navigation, all shallow passes shift regularly. I've been in Marco, Naples, and little Clam pass since Irma and the offshore nature of the storm didn't seem to make major changes. Irma made major changes to a high-rise I fixed however.

Jiblet is a tooth expert? Stick to gizzards maybe.

Glad that couple didn't get hurt or worse. They sound underfunded, like Zonker says, but otherwise earning their way and looking to go on a walkabout it seems. No harm there. Close one though.

Trying to put in an unknown shoaling small pass at night was novice and naive, but that keel was departing on its next hard kiss of sand or even rough conditions regardless, and in west FL the sand is hard to avoid. Maybe they got lucky it happened when and where it did.

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9 hours ago, RKoch said:

Addendum:

Story in paper says they spent $5K buying boat, same amount working on it. Guy says they rewired  it and 'worked on hull'. No further details. Supposedly they only have $90 between them. They weren't going to get far on that, not sure what their plan was...if they had one. I'm not going to rag on them for being newbies, but it does appear they didn't have a clue, did little research and learning, no money to fund their cruising, and were naively optimistic dreamers. It's a story that gets repeated, and will continue to be.

It costs more than $90 to clear into the Bahamas.

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21 hours ago, savoir said:

And the moral is . . . . .  never enter a strange port at night.

I've got a guy over in a Facebook you should chat with. Says coming into a strange port at night is "basic seamanship" that he teaches in his sailing classes, and he's done it hundreds of times all over the world, and anyone that has a rule about not entering strange ports at night is a giant pussy with no sailing skills.

One *should* have the skills to enter a strange harbor at not. And one should also have the wisdom not to use them except in dire, pressing need, or if a harbor is such a wide open well lit place you can slam dunk it.

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On 2/9/2018 at 9:37 PM, AmericanVagrant said:

The Lagniappe was sinking in about 9-feet of water and about to roll over. It was too shallow for the tow boat to approach and get them off the sailboat

That had to be one deep draft Sea Tow boat. Don't think I've ever seen one with 9 ft draft. 

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Quote

They sold everything they owned in Colorado. Last year they bought a 28-foot sailboat 

Ummmmm = Homeless couple goes searching the unknown for a FREE Anchorage

Score = Tied w HotRod

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11 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I noticed that nobody commented on the warm water being their real savior. If they had done this further north or on the West Coast, they'd both likely died from hypothermia.

Or just in a different winter. It's been warm. Water is 77 in Fort Myers this morning. It wouldn't be all that usual for it to be upper 50's at this time of year.

I'm the biggest cold water sissy in the world and don't tolerate temps below 80 well at all, but even I have to admit that 77 is not all that cold.

8 hours ago, RKoch said:

Didn't make it out :(. Helped friend measure up for new halyards and a couple other minor chores. Headed out canal, got to bridge, and starting under bridge the temp alarm went off. Made a quick U-turn, apologized to bridge tender over vhf (explained situation). He was cool. Sailed back up canal and drifted into slip. Checked raw water filter, tightened a belt, was idling motor and watching sunset. Everything fine. Then just before killing motor and closing up boat the temp alarm went off again. I told friend it was likely the raw water pump impeller, but need to check thruhull to make sure it's not obstructed (seacock  did operate freely). So never made it out as far as sunk boat. Guy in slip next door said he was out yesterday, and it wasn't visible.

If not barnacles over the hole or worn impeller, it's my least favorite part of a water-cooled engine: the mixing elbow.

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17 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

 

You're already levelled up three or four times above these people. I suspect that if you end up sinking a boat, it will be for some much better reason than "we didn't know anything could go wrong and went into a treacherous location with a questionable boat" and unfortunately it's likely that you'll be in a much more interesting place.

I noticed that nobody commented on the warm water being their real savior. If they had done this further north or on the West Coast, they'd both likely died from hypothermia. Their mistake was on the level of that Morning Dew jerk whose widow successfully sued the USCG.

FB- Doug

Ha, thanks Doug, I'll try not to disappoint.

Ugh, just thinking about 11°C water in the PNW makes me shiver.  I do lots of diving out there and I can't take it for more than about an hour in a 7mm suit before I start shaking hard.

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On 2/10/2018 at 2:07 AM, savoir said:

And the moral is . . . . .  never enter a strange port at night.

At least with the lights on. shudder.gif

I applaud these people. I hope they try it again and succeed. I may just slip them a $20. 

How do you get sailing experience without sailing?  I learned it the old fashioned way, I bought a boat and taught myself. 

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8 minutes ago, the_abandoned_brane said:

How do you get sailing experience without sailing?

Crew on boats and learn directly from people who have experience, of course.

10 minutes ago, the_abandoned_brane said:

I learned it the old fashioned way, I bought a boat and taught myself.

That's exactly what these people did.  Didn't work out too well, did it?

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10 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

It costs more than $90 to clear into the Bahamas.

I think that's all they were able to slavage after things went pearshaped. 

Still, it doesn't sound like they have any idea of they type of unexpected expenses that come with boat ownership and cruising let alone even remotely prepared to deal with them.  

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20 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:
31 minutes ago, the_abandoned_brane said:

  I learned it the old fashioned way, I bought a boat and taught myself. 

That's exactly what these people did.  Didn't work out too well, did it?

Teacheng youselfe sailleng ist ounr thinge, teacheng youselfe navigatition is somthinge ealse.                             :)

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I have been wondering about the keel coming off. Even if the bolts were in sad shape. A hard hit could cause water to come in. Sitting on the bottom creates a feeling of lost stability, which might cause them to think the keel came off. More info as to their speed, the wind and tides, the waves and stuff, would help. A look at the boat would be good. Can I assume it is a hazard to navigation in its current position.

Friend Paul from BC with not a lot of $$, but with sailing experience, found romance online, and a boat in Florida. He has been down in the Islands for about 9 years. Has to work at odd jobs, but the plan is working. Traded the original romance for another model.

Unkle Krusty

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5 pages of google have news articles on the couple! That is a catchy byline for reporters...

Some action on the gofundme page, a Churchill quote and the last [unrelated boat] pic could make the CA thread for shite on the back...https://www.gofundme.com/new-sailing-life

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17 minutes ago, Norse Horse said:

5 pages of google have news articles on the couple! That is a catchy byline for reporters...

Some action on the gofundme page, a Churchill quote and the last [unrelated boat] pic could make the CA thread for shite on the back...https://www.gofundme.com/new-sailing-life

27609222_1518148805.2273.jpg

Quote

$1,280 of $10,000 goal

Raised by 43 people in 2 days

An average of $30 per contributor!

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32 minutes ago, Norse Horse said:

5 pages of google have news articles on the couple! That is a catchy byline for reporters...

Some action on the gofundme page, a Churchill quote and the last [unrelated boat] pic could make the CA thread for shite on the back...https://www.gofundme.com/new-sailing-life

 

I concur with this Comment on their gofundme page;

20 mins ago

Seriously, take responsibility for your stupidity and immaturity. You are victims of only yourselves. It's abundantly clear you're not prepared to not leave the confines of your hometowns in Colorado (close to mommy and daddy, or daddy/daddy or mommy/mommy, whichever) let alone the open waters. The fact that you came here BEGGING for money to fix your stupidity just shows the world your arrogance and ignorance. You should be in hiding, not out begging for cash to continue your voyage to the bottom of the millennial scum bucket. You've gone this far on your own, take the $90 and go home. And give your dog to someone so you don't bring IT to it's untimely demise.

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