Sign in to follow this  
sailor92

I'm new to sailing, and want to sail on the ocean, need advice.

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

I'm new to sailing. I've been on sail boats before a few times, but always as a passenger only. Well I have decided that I want to cross the Pacific Ocean from Queensland Australia to California. It's pretty much a spiritual thing for me. Obviously, I am aware that there's a lot of stuff to know in order to survive this kind of journey. I want to know what is the steps I should take in order to build up my skills as a sailor so that I know just enough to survive if I were on my own on the trip. Which books do I need to read, in terms of equipment (boats, auto-pilot etc), sailing techniques and control, sailing routes, seasonal weather conditions, possible threats/dangers. EVERYTHING necessary, I want to learn, which books I need as well and what kinda experience I should gun for. I really don't know EXACTLY what im getting into so I want you all to give me realistic heads up.

I was thinking of first trying my hand at sailing at a local club, than maybe sailing coastally for a while, in order to get some sea miles. But also what kinda "specific" things would I need to learn, like sail routes across the Pacific, ideal stop-over locations... Thanks for the help everyone.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, sailor92 said:

Hi everyone,

I'm new to sailing. I've been on sail boats before a few times, but always as a passenger only. Well I have decided that I want to cross the Pacific Ocean from Queensland Australia to California. It's pretty much a spiritual thing for me. Obviously, I am aware that there's a lot of stuff to know in order to survive this kind of journey. I want to know what is the steps I should take in order to build up my skills as a sailor so that I know just enough to survive if I were on my own on the trip. Which books do I need to read, in terms of equipment (boats, auto-pilot etc), sailing techniques and control, sailing routes, seasonal weather conditions, possible threats/dangers. EVERYTHING necessary, I want to learn, which books I need as well and what kinda experience I should gun for. I really don't know EXACTLY what im getting into so I want you all to give me realistic heads up.

I was thinking of first trying my hand at sailing at a local club, than maybe sailing coastally for a while, in order to get some sea miles. But also what kinda "specific" things would I need to learn, like sail routes across the Pacific, ideal stop-over locations... Thanks for the help everyone.
 

Southern Cross Yachting is the greatest sailing school of the face of this earth. The principle has the wisdom of the ages, the patience of Job and the swarthy good looks of George Cloony. Also they are based right there at Manly in Brisbane. 3396 4100. 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LB, I didn't know you ran a sailing school.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Southern Cross Yachting is the greatest sailing school of the face of this earth. The principle has the wisdom of the ages, the patience of Job and the swarthy good looks of George Cloony. Also they are based right there at Manly in Brisbane. 3396 4100. 

Buy a Fokin Ad :lol:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

LB, I didn't know you ran a sailing school.

Sometimes I think it is more like a marriage guidance counseling service conducted on a boat. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The majority of long range cruisers do not know much about sailing, so you can skip that. Maybe read a primer about it on the way across. That leaves anchoring skills. The easy way to learn about anchoring is start a new thread with the words "How to Anchor" in the subject. Most everthing else you need can simply be purchased. You do have money, right? The YouTube/GoFundMe sailing the seas gimmick is a thoroughly occupied space.

Sailing to CA from QLD directly is not advised. You can go via the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, or via Japan. The best thing about the Japan route is that the Philippines lies along the way. Most sailors stop in the Philippines, immediately come to their senses, and go no further. This will save you much time, distance and risk. There is really no reason to go on to California. I speak from experience. There is nothing here for you. California can be a nice stopover on the way to Latin America, however. But you will find the airline connections from QLD quite affordable compared to the anchoring gear recommended by the forum.

That is all I know.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Sometimes I think it is more like a marriage guidance counseling service conducted on a boat. 

slip round n clean me keyboard bastard .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sailor 92,

Good on you for putting it out there and asking for advice BEFORE  hand. 

My 2c, get professional tuition. I know a lot of people say they can''t afford it, but this has to be easily the best ROI you'll ever spend of your budget if your planning a long offshore passage. You'll  learn more in a day than you will in months of pottering around sailing by yourself. 

I take out a fair few newbies, and overall there is a marked difference in my confidence between people who have had proper training compared to those who have just been sailing dinghys and migrated to keelboats thinking it is simply a step up in size. (which is what I did when I was 17, being of course bullet proof and thinking my shit didn't stink).

For example, everyone I know that's done a SSSC (Survival and Safety at Sea) course found it worth the money. The cool thing is not just the tuition, but the intangibles, hanging around people with that level of experience will make a difference that may save your life one day.

Disclaimer, I know LB personally and he's a mate, and yes he owns a training school, and that makes no fucking difference at all to my advice. I know this sounds like a fan boy, but being able to tap into that level of experience is worth an order of magnitude more than the cost of any course. Just make sure the training school is certified, and not some numpty that's decided to offer training on the side. 

It's amazing the difference in your attitude when it's your toy, when I was just crew I only cared if the new crew member was female and smoking hot.  Shit still goes wrong on boats with a good crew, and as an owner paying the bills you learn very quickly the difference in having well trained crew.  

That's my opinion mate, good luck with your endeavors regardless of what path you take.

SB

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get some experience on other peoples boats.  Your first boat, start small and learn to handle it, navigate, and how to maintain a boat. 

The biggest mistake is to jump in the deep end by buying a 40'er, and thinking you can read a book or two in lieu of actual experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, RKoch said:

Get some experience on other peoples boats.  Your first boat, start small and learn to handle it, navigate, and how to maintain a boat. 

The biggest mistake is to jump in the deep end by buying a 40'er, and thinking you can read a book or two in lieu of actual experience.

Gosh, I was expecting "get a SJ24 and a Delorme, give SA access to the Delorme and go for it." It's been pretty quiet lately.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

Southern Cross Yachting is the greatest sailing school of the face of this earth. The principle has the wisdom of the ages, the patience of Job and the swarthy good looks of George Cloony. Also they are based right there at Manly in Brisbane. 3396 4100

 

I heard half way round the world that George Cloony is the wannabe doppelgänger of some Manly man from Manly 

He dreams of the easy life

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

Sometimes I think it is more like a marriage guidance counseling service conducted on a boat. 

With a complementary Swedish backpacker along? (and no, I didn't misspell that.....)

FKT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check in with these gals. One of them will show you the  ropes !!!!. Oh you must like dogs

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

With a complementary Swedish backpacker along? (and no, I didn't misspell that.....)

FKT

Not complementary but on the Airlie beach trips they can catch and kill their own. But they don't get breakfast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, sailor92 said:

Hi everyone,

I'm new to sailing. I've been on sail boats before a few times, but always as a passenger only. Well I have decided that I want to cross the Pacific Ocean from Queensland Australia to California. It's pretty much a spiritual thing for me. Obviously, I am aware that there's a lot of stuff to know in order to survive this kind of journey. I want to know what is the steps I should take in order to build up my skills as a sailor so that I know just enough to survive if I were on my own on the trip. Which books do I need to read, in terms of equipment (boats, auto-pilot etc), sailing techniques and control, sailing routes, seasonal weather conditions, possible threats/dangers. EVERYTHING necessary, I want to learn, which books I need as well and what kinda experience I should gun for. I really don't know EXACTLY what im getting into so I want you all to give me realistic heads up.

I was thinking of first trying my hand at sailing at a local club, than maybe sailing coastally for a while, in order to get some sea miles. But also what kinda "specific" things would I need to learn, like sail routes across the Pacific, ideal stop-over locations... Thanks for the help everyone.
 

That's the hard way. Buy a boat cheap in Florida, sail down to the Caribbean, get it refitted half price. Then sail it downwind across the pacific next season. 

Doing a Yachtmaster Course would be a good way to find out if you are up for it. Covers everything in your first paragraph. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Southern Cross Yachting is the greatest sailing school of the face of this earth. The principle has the wisdom of the ages, the patience of Job and the swarthy good looks of George Cloony. Also they are based right there at Manly in Brisbane. 3396 4100. 

 

That's ideal, I will pop over and take a formal training course. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, daddle said:

The majority of long range cruisers do not know much about sailing, so you can skip that. Maybe read a primer about it on the way across. That leaves anchoring skills. The easy way to learn about anchoring is start a new thread with the words "How to Anchor" in the subject. Most everthing else you need can simply be purchased. You do have money, right? The YouTube/GoFundMe sailing the seas gimmick is a thoroughly occupied space.

Sailing to CA from QLD directly is not advised. You can go via the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, or via Japan. The best thing about the Japan route is that the Philippines lies along the way. Most sailors stop in the Philippines, immediately come to their senses, and go no further. This will save you much time, distance and risk. There is really no reason to go on to California. I speak from experience. There is nothing here for you. California can be a nice stopover on the way to Latin America, however. But you will find the airline connections from QLD quite affordable compared to the anchoring gear recommended by the forum.

That is all I know.

Yeah I just read up on prevailing winds and sail routes, and I realize my QLD to CA trip is quite a difficult one. I might have to switch directions. The Japan route sounds much better on paper for a beginner, it's shorter, arguably safer with more stop overs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Sailor 92,

Good on you for putting it out there and asking for advice BEFORE  hand. 

My 2c, get professional tuition. I know a lot of people say they can''t afford it, but this has to be easily the best ROI you'll ever spend of your budget if your planning a long offshore passage. You'll  learn more in a day than you will in months of pottering around sailing by yourself. 

I take out a fair few newbies, and overall there is a marked difference in my confidence between people who have had proper training compared to those who have just been sailing dinghys and migrated to keelboats thinking it is simply a step up in size. (which is what I did when I was 17, being of course bullet proof and thinking my shit didn't stink).

For example, everyone I know that's done a SSSC (Survival and Safety at Sea) course found it worth the money. The cool thing is not just the tuition, but the intangibles, hanging around people with that level of experience will make a difference that may save your life one day.

Disclaimer, I know LB personally and he's a mate, and yes he owns a training school, and that makes no fucking difference at all to my advice. I know this sounds like a fan boy, but being able to tap into that level of experience is worth an order of magnitude more than the cost of any course. Just make sure the training school is certified, and not some numpty that's decided to offer training on the side. 

It's amazing the difference in your attitude when it's your toy, when I was just crew I only cared if the new crew member was female and smoking hot.  Shit still goes wrong on boats with a good crew, and as an owner paying the bills you learn very quickly the difference in having well trained crew.  

That's my opinion mate, good luck with your endeavors regardless of what path you take.

SB

Yep I like this idea, I will get tuition then, I know getting guided education is better ROI than mucking about on dinghy's and watching youtube. And I agree about the learning by osmosis factor, the intangibles is exactly what I want to absorb, so I don't crash like that couple in the news story lost their boat on day 2. I'm smart enough to appreciate the damn vastness of the Pacific and what I don't know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SCANAS said:

That's the hard way. Buy a boat cheap in Florida, sail down to the Caribbean, get it refitted half price. Then sail it downwind across the pacific next season. 

Doing a Yachtmaster Course would be a good way to find out if you are up for it. Covers everything in your first paragraph. 

Yep, I just realized I had picked the wrong direction. This sounds better. Will look up pro courses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Cheques in the mail.

payola-1-1.jpg.8eff8434b05f6b6fd0c9ad2afe0becbd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, sailor92 said:

I have only testes.

If you can handle the ribbing you get here, you'll do fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Sometimes I think it is more like a marriage guidance counseling service conducted on a boat. 

 

LOL!  He did mention his crew?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/11/2018 at 5:27 PM, sailor92 said:

I was thinking of first trying my hand at sailing at a local club

Do this! Your on the right track. You won't regret it at all. Get in to the sport any way you can, get on a bunch of boats with a bunch of different sailors. You will find out what you like and don't like, what you know and don't know, and you will be surprised how much that shapes your dream

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, savoir said:

Any chance you could start out by getting a boat ?

Just a thought.

Bingo! But not just any boat. Find a marina derelict that you can pick up for almost free. Learn all about boat maintenance and repairs as you bring it back to life. Learn all about rigging as you refit it. Rebuild the engine yourself. As you're doing all this, sail the keel off the thing. Go on longer and longer trips, seek out nasty conditions. Break shit left and right and fix it under the worse conditions. Go where you shouldn't, foul your anchor, run aground, pop a thru Hull and figure out how to keep your boat from sinking, get thoroughly lost during a night sail and figure out how to get back, dodge freighters in the thick fog right in the middle of the shipping channel. Do all of this and more. Then sell the boat, buy a proper ocean crossing boat and go for it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, sailor92 said:

That's ideal, I will pop over and take a formal training course. 

Make sure to check the tide chart before booking a lesson time. It's very embarrassing when you can't even get out of the marina.

FKT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops. Posted something in the wrong thread, ended up at this end of the bar and don't know how to delete the post, so now that I'm here...

In addition to all the good advice above, look up 'The World Cruising Encyclopedia' by Steve and Linda Dashew. It's a great, extensive resource. Get a hard copy and read up on it while your taking lessons. Once your on your own boat, put the well worn hard copy in a safe place aboard.

(Another hint: The 'Mariners Weather Handbook' is available free online and maybe these days the other volumes as well)

 

 

 

Edited by fufkin
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should go to Sailing Anarchy Classifieds, buy a sportboat and go kill it! Any other advice is self serving and rude.

oh yeah, buy the Fareast28R.

wife wants it gone and you don’t even have to destroy the rig, the hard parts already been done!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2018 at 6:27 AM, sailor92 said:

Hi everyone,

I'm new to sailing. I've been on sail boats before a few times, but always as a passenger only. Well I have decided that I want to cross the Pacific Ocean from Queensland Australia to California. It's pretty much a spiritual thing for me. Obviously, I am aware that there's a lot of stuff to know in order to survive this kind of journey. I want to know what is the steps I should take in order to build up my skills as a sailor so that I know just enough to survive if I were on my own on the trip. Which books do I need to read, in terms of equipment (boats, auto-pilot etc), sailing techniques and control, sailing routes, seasonal weather conditions, possible threats/dangers. EVERYTHING necessary, I want to learn, which books I need as well and what kinda experience I should gun for. I really don't know EXACTLY what im getting into so I want you all to give me realistic heads up.

I was thinking of first trying my hand at sailing at a local club, than maybe sailing coastally for a while, in order to get some sea miles. But also what kinda "specific" things would I need to learn, like sail routes across the Pacific, ideal stop-over locations... Thanks for the help everyone.
 

 so you got a taste of it n u like it...Sailing is a bit like sex...if your smart the more you do it and pay attention to the details the better you get.. and it will become a natural reflex without having to think about it....if your hard headed n dumb you just stay in the same place where you started.  Sailing attracts a lot of " dreamers"  ...those who want to sail but can't.......... ( like those guys when I was at my instructors evaluation .. I asked some of them what made them want to be sailing instructors and basically they all had the same answer that last year they had gone sailing and now they wanted to open a sailing school as I then watched them all fail or flail because they couldn't even sail a boat to the dock or hadnt the skills).............(So you've been sailing and now you want to cross oceans.... THATS GOOD!! , IT;S GOOD TO HAVE A GOAL.  but to do that you must start somewhere. in the end, even if you join clubs, read books you still must at some point buy a boat  of your own. this is going to be a time consuming process. you must first get experience owning a boat and all that it entails. start small...like 20-30ft and after a couple years move up or if you prefer stay with that size but move your goals up as well as time goes by  from just day sailing to over night trips to more than over night trips n so forth then after you feel ready bite the bullet n go farther until you can cross the ocean...this is of course the safe n sane method... the rimus method is to just go with any bucket that floats n hope your luck will hold out... anyways all the best to you....

 

Oh ya also I'm from California and I wouldn't cross the pacific to go there...there are by far much better places to go that are closer to Australia..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

think hard about it.  As you've found out on here, going Aussie to Cali is the wrong direction.  Which means you have yet to digest some very basic weather and currents concepts, and gain experience putting those concepts into practice.

Start by reading Bowditch (American Practical Navigator).  Read it and understand it.  Then ask yourself again, do I really want to do this.

Look up youtube videos of boats and ships in rough weather and ask yourself again.

I've got 50 yrs at sea behind me, countless miles of blue water transits, a nav arch degree and a USCG unlimited merchant license.  I am very wary still of the power of the sea.  It can be a big bad nasty place and if you are not tip top fit, physically and mentally, to handle what the open ocean can dish out, you are fortunate to survive it.

Do open ocean boat deliveries if you can as crew.  That will give you a starting point to see what you might be getting yourself into.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-02-11 at 5:27 PM, sailor92 said:

I've been on sail boats before a few times, but always as a passenger only. Well I have decided that I want to cross the Pacific Ocean from Queensland Australia to California. It's pretty much a spiritual thing for me.... I really don't know EXACTLY what im getting into so I want you all to give me realistic heads up.

Troll?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest you do what Snoopy does when he is feeling stressed out. Lie down, put your head in a water dish, and remain that way until the feeling passes.

 There is the tried and true method of standing naked in a cold shower tearing up a handful of $100 bills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go sailing. Get hours on the water. Assuming that you are in Sydney... actually, wherever you are, go to your local yacht club(s) and tell them you want crewing experice... most clubs have low key racing where they offer newbies spots on good, safe boats. Get a few hundred hours experience of just sailing, then see how you feel. You'll at least have a better idea of the questions to ask. Go sailing young man (or woman).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Weyalan said:

Go sailing. Get hours on the water. Assuming that you are in Sydney... actually, wherever you are, go to your local yacht club(s) and tell them you want crewing experice... most clubs have low key racing where they offer newbies spots on good, safe boats. Get a few hundred hours experience of just sailing, then see how you feel. You'll at least have a better idea of the questions to ask. Go sailing young man (or woman).

this.............or you will die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, fufkin said:

Oops. Posted something in the wrong thread, ended up at this end of the bar and don't know how to delete the post, so now that I'm here...

In addition to all the good advice above, look up 'The World Cruising Encyclopedia' by Steve and Linda Dashew. It's a great, extensive resource. Get a hard copy and read up on it while your taking lessons. Once your on your own boat, put the well worn hard copy in a safe place aboard.

(Another hint: The 'Mariners Weather Handbook' is available free online and maybe these days the other volumes as well)

 

 

 

This, and Chapman's piloting.  The end all be all of navigation and seamanship.  

 

https://www.amazon.com/Chapman-Piloting-Seamanship-67th/dp/1588169618

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you get to the Solomons, the girls from the Malaita Gastronimical Society Women's Auxillary love to have guests for dinner.

illo039b.jpg.03826fdacdbf80f7e61688857d967a40.jpg

Don't be afraid to call for a tow...

i056-hd.thumb.jpg.d7ed4ee48b04e0cf16f96ab209a00bbc.jpg

And I agree about Chapman's.

It's like Seamanship for Dummies.....

Edited by madohe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sell everything you own, make sure you put the dogs favorite toys in the grab bag and your on your way. What could possibly go wrong?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this