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Zora

38 foot steel Cutter rebuild

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Anarchists

I've been lucky and struck gold in the form of a fully restored 38 foot steel hull for cheap. 

And that's just what it is right now, a hull and some rig and an engine. A decent springboard. 

Instead of writing it all out, i'm going to "Vlog" it here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ05SYliiCbF_0mLNTI4IQg?view_as=subscriber

There will be weekly videos, and they will be of decent quality... I'll try and get herself to wear a bikini in some episodes so i can actually call it a proper sailing Vlog because that's Youtube now..

I had a 23 foot glass boat i had been working on but this boat came up and i had to have it. The glass boat owes me SFA. 

Its a Dick Koopman design (design 220)

 

sdA46rG.jpg

 

99nn0iJ.jpg

 

(Ps. i know the hull is the cheapest bit etc etc.. I have a healthy budget, i am an Engineer and i have some sailing done (4000 miles including transat on a steel boat)

 

Enjoy

Rhys

 

 

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Steel rusts from the inside of the hull...avoid any standing water in the bilge, chain lockers,  or on any interior surface, keep a eye on the  tanks .

be sure that you electric system is isolated from the hull

the modern paints work very well.   Make friends with a sand blaster .  

If you keep on top of it steel is a good material 

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It's been fully sandblasted and epoxied with several coats. It will be spray foamed. 

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KQoBBVF.jpg

sDuYCQb.jpg

Its a bit dusty and messy in the photos, but the hull is immaculate. 

There will be one more coat of epoxy before foam 

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As they say “One man’s dream is good enough for a vlog”!

And if you have been identified as a female by others before 2016, then please post a vlog of your tits so we can get to work here.

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29 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

As they say “One man’s dream is good enough for a vlog”!

And if you have been identified as a female by others before 2016, then please post a vlog of your tits so we can get to work here.

Well my chest isn't that hairy if that's enough. 

 

Get out to sea for a couple of days on your own and it actually would suffice

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Be sure that water can not pool in front of frames.

limber holes are almost always to small. Places like anchor chain lockers need special attention 

part of the bilge , unhill or frames, should be leveled with cement or Chokfast 

you should be able to make all water run downhill...then once down hill...all water be pumped out.

typically A small sump  will be formed from cement that the bilge pump sucks from .

 

a steel boat also need insulation on the inside...above the waterline .

spary foam is typical .

 

i see a can of Jotun paint on deck .  Very good system .

https://www.jotun.com/jo/en/corporate/business/marine-coatings/

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Koopmans is a kind of cruising design Guru in Clogland. His designs were reliable stable cruising boats. Not bad sailers but steady and reliable. Good luck with the boat and keep us updated about the progress.

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42 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Be sure that water can not pool in front of frames.

limber holes are almost always to small. Places like anchor chain lockers need special attention 

part of the bilge , unhill or frames, should be leveled with cement or Chokfast 

you should be able to make all water run downhill...then once down hill...all water be pumped out.

typically A small sump  will be formed from cement that the bilge pump sucks from .

 

a steel boat also need insulation on the inside...above the waterline .

spary foam is typical .

 

i see a can of Jotun paint on deck .  Very good system .

https://www.jotun.com/jo/en/corporate/business/marine-coatings/

Once the spray foam is on, its bonded to the steel.. So limber holes are redundant.....

I also said above that it will be spray foamed!

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24 minutes ago, maarten said:

Koopmans is a kind of cruising design Guru in Clogland. His designs were reliable stable cruising boats. Not bad sailers but steady and reliable. Good luck with the boat and keep us updated about the progress.

Absolutely, I will post new videos and updates here. 

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8 minutes ago, rhysmate said:

Once the spray foam is on, its bonded to the steel.. So limber holes are redundant.....

I also said above that it will be spray foamed!

Make sure that water cant sit behind frames 

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cool project! my dad had a steel boat (Colvin Gazelle). that said, pay heed to the wisdom of Neil Young...

 

rust.jpg

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Make sure that water cant sit behind frames 

Will do :)

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27 minutes ago, overdraft said:

cool project! my dad had a steel boat (Colvin Gazelle). that said, pay heed to the wisdom of Neil Young...

 

rust.jpg

haha, very good!

44 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Nice looking boat rhys. Best of luck with your project.

Thanks Bob!

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15 hours ago, casc27 said:

Yes, but it looks like they used Hellmann's mayonnaise to coat the inside. (Sorry, couldn't help myself.) Good luck with the project.

Plot twist it is mayo..

Thanks :)

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Work is progressing well, the mast is now on the floor ready for new rigging, and i'm sourcing a paint supplier

Rhys

 

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On 2/14/2018 at 5:39 AM, slug zitski said:

Places like anchor chain lockers need special attention 

 

I've see an appropriately sized rubber cannister used to hold the chain on a steel boat: it isolates the chain, stops galvy from starting, contains rust away from that nice new epoxy foam interior and weighs nothing. (comparatively.)

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On ‎2‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 6:46 AM, slug zitski said:

Steel rusts from the inside of the hull...avoid any standing water in the bilge, chain lockers,  or on any interior surface, keep a eye on the  tanks .

be sure that you electric system is isolated from the hull

the modern paints work very well.   Make friends with a sand blaster .  

If you keep on top of it steel is a good material 

More than one boat has rusted from the head out. Watch out for how the shower and head drain.

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7 hours ago, Parma said:

I've see an appropriately sized rubber cannister used to hold the chain on a steel boat: it isolates the chain, stops galvy from starting, contains rust away from that nice new epoxy foam interior and weighs nothing. (comparatively.)

The plan here is to build a plastic or plywood/fibreglass container that drains into the black water tank in the keel. that'll keep the water out of the bilge! thanks for the input. 

7 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

More than one boat has rusted from the head out. Watch out for how the shower and head drain.

I will! i plan to use something similar to the chain locker above to keep the water isolated. 

2 hours ago, By the lee said:

Why put an interior in it?

Just build a nav stn. a la Vendee smack in the centre, hang some pipe berths in the aft quarters, plant a head at the base of the mast and line the hull with those garment bags a la Pogo/SunFast and cast off!

You know, that idea has crossed my mind a couple of times... i met a guy in cape verde that picked up an abandoned ex vendee globe boat and lives on it.. he had a small berth and a massive nav station in the middle... Not sure the missus would be so interested in the project if i go that route though! 

 

Thanks for your inputs

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great project Rhys, best of luck, whats the back story on the boat? was she someones project that got abandoned?

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12 hours ago, rhysmate said:

Work is progressing well, the mast is now on the floor ready for new rigging, and i'm sourcing a paint supplier

Rhys

 

Why do you have to renew stays? I would first finish hull, then sail the boat with current rigging, then after a while if necessary renew. Tha boat has not been used! 

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The really good thing about steel that no other building material has is that steel tells you clearly where you need to focus attention. Rust is that indicator. All others -- glass, aluminum, and wood -- do a darn good job of hiding weaknesses until catastrophe ensues.

A friend ran a beautiful steel schooner. When he detected rust, he just immediately dealt with it. If you keep the hull accessible (i.e., don't coat it with foam) then you can find any problem, grind for a couple of minutes, put a couple of coats on, and you are set.

So I'd suggest keeping it open, easy to access. Just like with any other boat: the more you cover things up, the more you will wish things were NOT covered up!

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17 hours ago, carcrash said:

Just like with any other boat: the more you cover things up, the more you will wish things were NOT covered up!

Amen to that.

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23 hours ago, thebook said:

great project Rhys, best of luck, whats the back story on the boat? was she someones project that got abandoned?

Thank you. She was set alight by her owner in the early 2000s (some say it was over a divorce or similar no one is sure, the guy disapeared) and sold on by insurance. She was then abandoned and bought about 6 yrs ago by a boat builder, who did all the steel work and moved on to a new project. 

22 hours ago, plenamar said:

Why do you have to renew stays? I would first finish hull, then sail the boat with current rigging, then after a while if necessary renew. Tha boat has not been used! 

The rigging is incomplete as it is. There are no running backstays and the outer shrouds are badly kinked as the mast was taken from a wreck that was laying on rocks. the middle shrouds are also questionable. 

 I would not feel comfortable sailing a boat with questionable rigging, and i would only be putting off the inevitable. Do it once, do it right.. especially while the budget is there. This boat will be sailing long enough when the time comes, and will be my home for a long time. The investment is a worthwhile one. 

edit: Also, i do plan to sail her without the interior soon, this will help me design her systems better, and let me get experience on her. So this rerigging is all part of that

22 hours ago, carcrash said:

The really good thing about steel that no other building material has is that steel tells you clearly where you need to focus attention. Rust is that indicator. All others -- glass, aluminum, and wood -- do a darn good job of hiding weaknesses until catastrophe ensues.

A friend ran a beautiful steel schooner. When he detected rust, he just immediately dealt with it. If you keep the hull accessible (i.e., don't coat it with foam) then you can find any problem, grind for a couple of minutes, put a couple of coats on, and you are set.

So I'd suggest keeping it open, easy to access. Just like with any other boat: the more you cover things up, the more you will wish things were NOT covered up!

I appreciate the comment, but foam is the option for me. Trying to insulate a steel boat with anything other than foam is a pain, and eliminating condensation and the resulting potential for capillary action is a tall order. The foam will create a vapour barrier and will seal the metal very well. That said, there are arguments for all options :) thanks for watching!

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I think I would just use ceilings instead of foam.

If air is trapped (which is all foam does), then air is an outstanding insulator. In fact, foam is always worse than still air, because the hydrocarbon chains of plastic do conduct heat much better than air does. So foam is not much worse than still air, but certainly always slightly worse. So you can instead trap air by ceilings, and still be able to remove said ceilings if necessary. There will come a day when you will hate that foam. It might not be right away, but it probably will be. You will never achieve a perfect water vapor seal, so water will get in there, and rust.

You are probably planning on covering the extremely ugly foam with ceilings, right? So skipping the foam step will just save you time and money.

If you want to see the long term results of spray on interior foam in a steel boat, check this out.

http://thecoastalpassage.com.au/rust.html

Here is a quote:

" I have read old books on steel boat building saying how good blown in polyurethane insulation is in steel boats... BULLSHIT! Water soaks it and retains it. the steel was a mess under the crap"

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9 minutes ago, carcrash said:

I think I would just use ceilings instead of foam.

If air is trapped (which is all foam does), then air is an outstanding insulator. In fact, foam is always worse than still air, because the hydrocarbon chains of plastic do conduct heat much better than air does. So foam is not much worse than still air, but certainly always slightly worse. So you can instead trap air by ceilings, and still be able to remove said ceilings if necessary. There will come a day when you will hate that foam. It might not be right away, but it probably will be. You will never achieve a perfect water vapor seal, so water will get in there, and rust.

You are probably planning on covering the extremely ugly foam with ceilings, right? So skipping the foam step will just save you time and money.

If you want to see the long term results of spray on interior foam in a steel boat, check this out.

http://thecoastalpassage.com.au/rust.html

Here is a quote:

" I have read old books on steel boat building saying how good blown in polyurethane insulation is in steel boats... BULLSHIT! Water soaks it and retains it. the steel was a mess under the crap"

OK so the author of that diatribe bought a POS that probably couldn't have had more things done poorly.

Timber over steel on a weather deck is always going to be a problem. I don't care what claims are made, it's going to be a problem. I'd never buy a steel boat with a timber deck. In fact I don't have *any* bare timber on my weather decks, even the ply hatches are covered in fibreglass/epoxy and painted.

Now inside, I'd bet that boat referred to was never properly painted. Sure the water migrated through the foam but if there'd been a decent barrier paint job and drainage to the bilges, much less likelihood of a problem.

In practical terms you *have to* insulate a steel hull with something because you're going to get massive condensation in cooler climates and fry your brains out in the tropics if you don't. Timber ceiling over an air gap isn't going to cut it.

For my boat I have something like 6 heavy coats of paint on the interior overlaid by 2 layers of 30mm thick polystyrene foil board designed for house insulation so fire retardant and doesn't produce toxic fumes. The foil layer acts as a vapour barrier. The lapped layers mean there are minimal air paths to the steel and I keep the moist interior air away from the cool steel hull, so minimal condensation. Then I did put a ply ceiling over the lot down to the cabin sole but no further so the entire bilge ares can be inspected. If anyone wants to inspect a bit of the hull sometime in the future they can use a hole saw to cut out a ply circle, cut a foam plug, then put it all back again. I'm not concerned about it.

Time will tell if I've done it right. I built it, I can fix it if I have to.

FKT

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On 3/8/2018 at 9:17 PM, carcrash said:

I think I would just use ceilings instead of foam.

If air is trapped (which is all foam does), then air is an outstanding insulator. In fact, foam is always worse than still air, because the hydrocarbon chains of plastic do conduct heat much better than air does. So foam is not much worse than still air, but certainly always slightly worse. So you can instead trap air by ceilings, and still be able to remove said ceilings if necessary. There will come a day when you will hate that foam. It might not be right away, but it probably will be. You will never achieve a perfect water vapor seal, so water will get in there, and rust.

You are probably planning on covering the extremely ugly foam with ceilings, right? So skipping the foam step will just save you time and money.

If you want to see the long term results of spray on interior foam in a steel boat, check this out.

http://thecoastalpassage.com.au/rust.html

Here is a quote:

" I have read old books on steel boat building saying how good blown in polyurethane insulation is in steel boats... BULLSHIT! Water soaks it and retains it. the steel was a mess under the crap"

Just saw the photo of the deck that had teak on it... Teak decks make me nervous for that exact reason.

The foam you are referring to was probably open cell, closed cell eliminates that issue and creates a vapour barrier. 

I won't have any timber against the steel of my boat. My deck fittings will  not be  bolted through the deck to avoid leaks and corrosion. 

Well built steel boats last well 

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On 3/8/2018 at 9:37 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

OK so the author of that diatribe bought a POS that probably couldn't have had more things done poorly.

Timber over steel on a weather deck is always going to be a problem. I don't care what claims are made, it's going to be a problem. I'd never buy a steel boat with a timber deck. In fact I don't have *any* bare timber on my weather decks, even the ply hatches are covered in fibreglass/epoxy and painted.

Now inside, I'd bet that boat referred to was never properly painted. Sure the water migrated through the foam but if there'd been a decent barrier paint job and drainage to the bilges, much less likelihood of a problem.

In practical terms you *have to* insulate a steel hull with something because you're going to get massive condensation in cooler climates and fry your brains out in the tropics if you don't. Timber ceiling over an air gap isn't going to cut it.

For my boat I have something like 6 heavy coats of paint on the interior overlaid by 2 layers of 30mm thick polystyrene foil board designed for house insulation so fire retardant and doesn't produce toxic fumes. The foil layer acts as a vapour barrier. The lapped layers mean there are minimal air paths to the steel and I keep the moist interior air away from the cool steel hull, so minimal condensation. Then I did put a ply ceiling over the lot down to the cabin sole but no further so the entire bilge ares can be inspected. If anyone wants to inspect a bit of the hull sometime in the future they can use a hole saw to cut out a ply circle, cut a foam plug, then put it all back again. I'm not concerned about it.

Time will tell if I've done it right. I built it, I can fix it if I have to.

FKT

Good call on the coatings, they are the real hero! Under protected steel won't last long at all. 

 

And yes, no insulation is a bad idea, although Bernard Moitissier didn't have any! Mad man :)

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8 hours ago, rhysmate said:

What kind of swaging tool did you use for the lifeline fittings?  It looked like it did a good job.  Around here we have to pay big bucks to have someone do the swaging for us on our stainless lifelines.  It would be much cheaper to do it ourselves, and probably just as reliable.

Thanks

dash

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On 3/12/2018 at 7:00 AM, rhysmate said:

The foam you are referring to was probably open cell, closed cell eliminates that issue and creates a vapour barrier. 

When I was a kid I spent every penny I could earn for a while on closed cell foam for a little speedboat project.

It's a really long story, but years later I cut that boat in half and chipped out the waterlogged foam.

They use high quality closed cell foam in Boston Whalers. And some of them get quite heavy.

So I think "closed cell" foam is a myth. Much like "barrier coat." West Systems' own testing revealed that their best barrier coat wasn't quite as good as wax, which is darn close to, but not quite, impermeable.

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32 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

When I was a kid I spent every penny I could earn for a while on closed cell foam for a little speedboat project.

It's a really long story, but years later I cut that boat in half and chipped out the waterlogged foam.

They use high quality closed cell foam in Boston Whalers. And some of them get quite heavy.

So I think "closed cell" foam is a myth. Much like "barrier coat." West Systems' own testing revealed that their best barrier coat wasn't quite as good as wax, which is darn close to, but not quite, impermeable.

I don't think "closed cell" foam is a myth.  But I think the notion that closed cell foams won't absorb water is a myth.  Perhaps modern foams have improved to prevent this, but I do know samples of Klegecell I took from my old boat definitely absorbed water and were very resistant to drying out.

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17 hours ago, dash34 said:

What kind of swaging tool did you use for the lifeline fittings?  It looked like it did a good job.  Around here we have to pay big bucks to have someone do the swaging for us on our stainless lifelines.  It would be much cheaper to do it ourselves, and probably just as reliable.

Thanks

dash

Here it is mate

https://www.ebay.ie/itm/16mm-300mm-12-Ton-Force-Hydraulic-Crimper-Cable-Wire-Crimping-Tool-Kit/122446280263?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

I'm not too sure about the longevity of the dies, they are made for Copper and AL but they seem to be doing a stellar job so far :) 

 

2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

When I was a kid I spent every penny I could earn for a while on closed cell foam for a little speedboat project.

It's a really long story, but years later I cut that boat in half and chipped out the waterlogged foam.

They use high quality closed cell foam in Boston Whalers. And some of them get quite heavy.

So I think "closed cell" foam is a myth. Much like "barrier coat." West Systems' own testing revealed that their best barrier coat wasn't quite as good as wax, which is darn close to, but not quite, impermeable.

 

2 hours ago, 12 metre said:

I don't think "closed cell" foam is a myth.  But I think the notion that closed cell foams won't absorb water is a myth.  Perhaps modern foams have improved to prevent this, but I do know samples of Klegecell I took from my old boat definitely absorbed water and were very resistant to drying out.

I think all foam will absorb a little water if submerged. But it's job is to stop condensation and from anyone with experience of it in steel hulls it does a good job. I asked the advice of a sandblaster in the yard, and he said he has yet to see it cause issue. A lot of old trawlers used it in there fish boxes and the steel was as new behind it in any of the cases he came across. 

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17 hours ago, dash34 said:

What kind of swaging tool did you use for the lifeline fittings?  It looked like it did a good job.  Around here we have to pay big bucks to have someone do the swaging for us on our stainless lifelines.  It would be much cheaper to do it ourselves, and probably just as reliable.

Thanks

dash

Almost forgot, when i was researching the best way to swage, this came up a lot but i couldn't get it to Ireland

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine--hand-swaging-tools--P002_065_001_502

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I have a Johnson hand swaging tool.  It's worked great for lifelines.

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2 hours ago, rhysmate said:

I think all foam will absorb a little water if submerged. But it's job is to stop condensation and from anyone with experience of it in steel hulls it does a good job. I asked the advice of a sandblaster in the yard, and he said he has yet to see it cause issue. A lot of old trawlers used it in there fish boxes and the steel was as new behind it in any of the cases he came across. 

Yeah, the boat I was talking about was submerged for a while. But I'd guess that it wouldn't sink unless the foam was wet. Chicken or egg? It was stolen for several years and came back waterlogged is all I know.

So try to avoid having your boat stolen and sunk.

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5 hours ago, rhysmate said:

Here it is mate

https://www.ebay.ie/itm/16mm-300mm-12-Ton-Force-Hydraulic-Crimper-Cable-Wire-Crimping-Tool-Kit/122446280263?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

I'm not too sure about the longevity of the dies, they are made for Copper and AL but they seem to be doing a stellar job so far :) 

 

 

I think all foam will absorb a little water if submerged. But it's job is to stop condensation and from anyone with experience of it in steel hulls it does a good job. I asked the advice of a sandblaster in the yard, and he said he has yet to see it cause issue. A lot of old trawlers used it in there fish boxes and the steel was as new behind it in any of the cases he came across. 

It stops the condensation because the dew point is in the middle of the foam(assuming you put enough on) where the warm air can't get quickly(being close celled) so the moisture doesn't condense out of the air,  but it doesn't actually prevents water from traveling through it if it's getting wet, eventually even water running down the surface over time seems to get in.  It also dampens sound a bit.    It absorbs a lot of water if left wet, or even if part of it is wet all the time it seems to wick it up higher eventually.  That's why it's a terrible idea to foam your bilges, but you are using the right tool(foam) in the right place :-).   Keep doing what you're doing!

 

Little runabouts are almost all foam filled under the floor, and I have yet to find a dry one.  An unscientific observation:  A garbage can of dry foam trimmings can be lifted with one hand.  A garbage can full of old removed foam from under a floor(small powerboats) takes two guys to lift(so is over 150lbs) and the handles are likely to tear right out of the can, a mistake new guys only make once, an 18' runabout will have several full garbage cans of foam under the floor, so multiplied by a bigger boat the amount of water retained can add a lot of weight.   We do put foam back, but we foam first, trim it dead level to the stringers and then put the deck down.  I've never yet opened up a boat where the foam was properly level with the underside of the deck, often it's as much as 4" low in some spots, and rot always starts around the holes drilled for pouring, even thought they are glassed over, I'm not sure if it's moisture coming up after getting in elsewhere and causing rot because they didn't seal the hole edges, or what, but no holes = no rot is simple enough for me :-).  Downside is the top layer now has opened cells, but upside is the deck is perfectly supported, and there are no large cavities that will fill up with water and freeze causing damage.  

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6 hours ago, jgbrown said:

Little runabouts are almost all foam filled under the floor, and I have yet to find a dry one.  An unscientific observation:  A garbage can of dry foam trimmings can be lifted with one hand.  A garbage can full of old removed foam from under a floor(small powerboats) takes two guys to lift(so is over 150lbs) and the handles are likely to tear right out of the can, a mistake new guys only make once, an 18' runabout will have several full garbage cans of foam under the floor, so multiplied by a bigger boat the amount of water retained can add a lot of weight.   We do put foam back, but we foam first, trim it dead level to the stringers and then put the deck down.  I've never yet opened up a boat where the foam was properly level with the underside of the deck, often it's as much as 4" low in some spots, and rot always starts around the holes drilled for pouring, even thought they are glassed over, I'm not sure if it's moisture coming up after getting in elsewhere and causing rot because they didn't seal the hole edges, or what, but no holes = no rot is simple enough for me :-).  Downside is the top layer now has opened cells, but upside is the deck is perfectly supported, and there are no large cavities that will fill up with water and freeze causing damage.  

Foaming in a gas tank, we decided to squish the foam into the proper shape instead of trimming it. We used a piece of plastic shower stall liner to make a "lid" over the area.

It turns out that the pressure in the foam is enough to lift several concrete blocks and a whole bunch of 5 gallon cans of resin. We had to try again with more weight, adding the work crew and some heavy rubber mats on top. It worked that time.

crew-weight.jpg?ssl=1

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On 3/19/2018 at 2:08 PM, rhysmate said:

I have a manual crimper that is just a pair of bolt cutters with a crimping die head instead of blades. It's primarily intended for crimp sleeves but I've used it on hand swage fittings for lifelines and it did just fine. It leaves crimp marks on the shaft of the fittings that you don't get with a hydraulic crimper but it makes a plenty strong enough joint.

Cost me $25 at Home Despot.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I have a manual crimper that is just a pair of bolt cutters with a crimping die head instead of blades. It's primarily intended for crimp sleeves but I've used it on hand swage fittings for lifelines and it did just fine. It leaves crimp marks on the shaft of the fittings that you don't get with a hydraulic crimper but it makes a plenty strong enough joint.

Cost me $25 at Home Despot.

I used CS Johnson hand crimp fittings and their crimp tool (53-210). It looks a lot like my nicro press crimp tool but has a slightly different die. A socket adapter in a drill saves a lot of time, but you are still doing the final turns by hand. I bought several extra sets of bolts for the tool because it does tend to eat up the threads.

00029.jpg

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They would all do the job for sure :)

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Mine is like the 53-215 - three offset crimps on the barrel of each fitting and nary a problem ever.

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9 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Mine is like the 53-215 - three offset crimps on the barrel of each fitting and nary a problem ever.

That would have been a nice option. I went through several sets of bolts on the crimper doing my lifelines.

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My new favourite photoo

 

VgCnJF1.jpg

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I like it.  I'm a sucker for a flush deck.

The paint treatment will be more important on it than on most boats I think.

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Plan is to have a solid frp spray hood, so it won't be so flush forever. . 

 

W9fI909.jpg

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Only Steal Boat for anyone less than a Billionaire Only come in Grey - White or Orange  

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Stealing an orange boat sounds like a bad idea - too visible.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Stealing an orange boat sounds like a bad idea - too visible.

No need to Steal 

They Pay you to do what you can on them !

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8 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

Only Steal Boat for anyone less than a Billionaire Only come in Grey - White or Orange  

i don't understand what you mean... sorry.. 

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That's O/K - nobody does.

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16 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

Only Steal Boat for anyone less than a Billionaire Only come in Grey - White or Orange  

 

8 hours ago, rhysmate said:

i don't understand what you mean... sorry.. 

 

3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

That's O/K - nobody does.

Related image

 

Image result for US Coast Guard ships animated.gif

 

Related image

Image result for US Coast Guard ships animated.gif

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1 hour ago, DA-WOODY said:

 

I like your website, i am a photographer too :) Thanks for watching. 

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On 16/04/2018 at 9:35 PM, thebook said:

Rhys, are you down in west Cork somewhere?

Yep. Shoot me a mail if you are local rhyswalter12@gmail.com

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Im actually in LA but used to know that part of the country well, really enjoying the videos, keep up the good work!

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2 hours ago, thebook said:

Im actually in LA but used to know that part of the country well, really enjoying the videos, keep up the good work!

Thanks for watching Mate, let me know if you make it back anytime soon!

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jesus christ boy, an Irish winter in the back of a transit, talk about motivation! I actually slept in the back of a transit for a summer working on a pipeline outside London and everyone thought i was nuts! is the long term goal to move it up to Cork?

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On 4/23/2018 at 6:03 AM, rhysmate said:

Could you do me a favour and drop the intro bit? The first time it was OK but the value halves at each repeat..... now I just skip over it.

Also see Dylan Winter's comments about the 'value' of long talking head segments to the camera.

Having built a steel boat from a pile of plate & flat bar I'm interested in watching other people suffer as well, but really watching someone talking about what they *have* done or *will* do gets old real fast......

If you're on the Patreon tit I understand the pressure to produce regular updates, but even so, you're losing at least one of your audience here. I'm really only interested in how you're doing stuff on the boat.

I couldn't get into this one, sorry.

FKT

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7 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Could you do me a favour and drop the intro bit? The first time it was OK but the value halves at each repeat..... now I just skip over it.

No. I like it. 

Also see Dylan Winter's comments about the 'value' of long talking head segments to the camera.

Having built a steel boat from a pile of plate & flat bar I'm interested in watching other people suffer as well, but really watching someone talking about what they *have* done or *will* do gets old real fast......

I assume you didn't try and video it, edit it and then post it in the hopes that people don't shit on it. I don't make these videos for everyone. I make them for the small number of people that want updates. If i tried to please everyone i would fail. There is a lot of work that goes into these videos, hours upon hours even if it doesn't show. I work on this boat for 2 days a week MAX because i work full time as well about 2 hours away from the boat so progress is super slow. I'm not a professional boat builder, or videographer. This weekend as i said in the video i had half a day to work and record a video. I repeatedly say in my videos not every video will be specifically about boat work. People seem to forget that these videos are free for people to watch, and they quickly begin to act like you are there to please them. Not everyone has "Built a boat from a pile of steel" and want things explained. 

I enjoy making the videos, it's my hobby. If people don't like them, tough shit. My friends and family like them, that's all that matters to me. All the well wishers and supporters are a great added bonus for me and i love when people do take value from it. 

If you're on the Patreon tit I understand the pressure to produce regular updates, but even so, you're losing at least one of your audience here. I'm really only interested in how you're doing stuff on the boat.

I couldn't get into this one, sorry.

I don't feel the pressure to upload, i do it because i enjoy it. Talking to the camera is the way i do it at the moment as i get better at videoing. It's completely up to you if you watch them. 

Thanks for watching them to date though and for the feedback, maybe only check in once a month a see the progress? 

 

 

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12 hours ago, thebook said:

jesus christ boy, an Irish winter in the back of a transit, talk about motivation! I actually slept in the back of a transit for a summer working on a pipeline outside London and everyone thought i was nuts! is the long term goal to move it up to Cork?

Ya, it was a challenge that's for sure! Hopefuly by the end of the summer i can actually sleep in her without freezing!

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i almost forgot about this thread

Boat is sailing well, fit out begins soon.

If you are interested in this sort of thing feel free to follow the vlog

Vlog - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ05SYliiCbF_0mLNTI4IQg?view_as=subscriber

Quite a lot left to be done, but her maiden sail (well first in 20 years) well extremely well. She is now on her new berth awaiting extensive work to the interior

0WlOxFV.jpg

 

0gMH2Xd.jpg

 

zV9fsDc.jpg

 

 

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14 hours ago, TheDragon said:

Looking great Rhys, it does seem strange to need to reef early on a big steel boat, but the taller mast will to that, leverage and all.

I wonder if you are following a fellow steelboater, the old seadog, Barry Perkins, who has made it to the Pacific from your corner of the world.

https://m.youtube.com/user/barryperrins/videos

Thanks mate, i am a little concerned however she is under ballasted at the moment. I am trying to make contact with the designer to discuss maybe adding extra ballast and just how much etc.. i would rather not cut that mast! time will tell :)

 

I haven't watched much of his channel, thanks for the recommendation

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Dont worry to much, empty hull, you will be adding thousands of kg before ready to sail. And Genua looks not to good, to full. And first halyard on main then reefline tight.

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22 hours ago, LeoV said:

Dont worry to much, empty hull, you will be adding thousands of kg before ready to sail. And Genua looks not to good, to full. And first halyard on main then reefline tight.

Thanks mate,  the genoa was just run through a block that was lashed to the toe rail. We were just trying to get her moved and i will sort all the deck hardware correctly next year :) the running rigging is all over the place but she sailed pretty well regardless! thanks for watching

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Next time haul out get a crane with a scale, so you know roughly the weight. Have fun.

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3 hours ago, LeoV said:

Next time haul out get a crane with a scale, so you know roughly the weight. Have fun.

She is 10 tonnes right now, so i have a bench mark for when i next haul her :)

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Specifications Koopmans.

refno220 ballast3,4 t  hull material steel displacement10,75t

Keep the interior light. It is a bit overweight (or design number a bit optimistic)

So it looks good, unless the used steel much heavier then specified.

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I have moved in to the boat, and as winter approached i am racing to get my insulation in. Shed loads to do before then but i can but try

 

 

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I've been following along on youtube, you've been making great progress, fair play. I helped a friend restore a 1972 Columbia 39' a few years back, we cruised and raced her a lot, great way to really understand your boat systems, we since moved on to a much newer Beneteau and the biggest difference we found (besides sailing performance) is the level of ergonomic design, each generation of boat improves its use of the limited space on board a little bit at a time so when you have 30 years between boats (what we had) the difference in the utilization was massive, if you can it would be well worth trying to get on a new boat of a similar size to just see what you can incorporate, best of luck with the build!

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On 2/14/2018 at 9:21 AM, Zora said:

Once the spray foam is on, its bonded to the steel.

I also said above that it will be spray foamed!

IMO you'd be better off with Armaflex AP, which is easier and nicer to work with. It comes in self-adhering sheets, and when necessary (see post #24, above) it can be removed without too much trouble.

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My mate found a pretty cool photo in his archives this week. in the below image (taken c. 1998 by his dad) you can see a green boat in the foreground on legs. That's my best friends boat, and the boat i learned to sail on and crossed the atlantic on and have done pretty much all of my sailing on. (bear in mind we were both about 8/9 years old when the photo was taken) 


In the background, you can see a red boat against the pier with a fire engine looming nearby. Look familiar? 

This was the day Zora was burned, and the last time she was afloat until now... Cool for a piece of her history to fall into place. 

tzhZwgx.jpg

glFGOyS.jpg

xgnxNsR.jpg

BrOjjjB.jpg

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