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Didnt watch your video....

 

the normal method to remove the teak planking is with a circular saw.

set the blade depth to teak thickness.

cut kerfs perpendicular to planks...across the deck 

perhaps 100mm apart 

take a chisel...wide chisel ...and break the teak apart.

use a randon orbital with #40 to remove teak residue and adhesive.

fill all the old holes with epoxy

dont use screws to hold the new deck down  

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What he said.

Depends whether it's bedded in sealant or epoxy. If sealant, maybe easier to remove and sand. If epoxy, maybe harder to remove and sand.

Install 12mm teak, can be re-grooved at least once, 8mm maybe not at all. Cost increment is insignificant (in the overall scheme of things.)

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What they both said. Lots and lots and lots O'work, but... about $$$ per hour cheaper if you do it yourself. Make friends with a cabinet maker and see if you can buy some odd sized and have them machined to specs for decks.

A friend did it on his Swan 47, and almost 20 years later looks fantastic (especially with +15,000 ocean miles on it).

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15000 miles in 20 years? That's an average of 15 miles per week, and would have no discernible effect. if anything, those miles would help by depositing salt in the grain and protecting it from air pollution grit.

Removing teak is easy. Removing the epoxy with which it was glued down or filling the screw holes is the hard part.

 

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You just start, pretty soon you'll have it worked out. Heres a hint, boatbuilders are usually very aggressive when it comes to ripping things apart and disc sanders are very useful. 

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before you chop it all up, get a chisel under one end and lift it, i have seent planks come off intact, whole boat striped in about 1/2 a day. only ever happened twice, but you never know.

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On 2/23/2018 at 9:40 PM, Fleetwood said:

What he said.

Depends whether it's bedded in sealant or epoxy. If sealant, maybe easier to remove and sand. If epoxy, maybe harder to remove and sand.

Install 12mm teak, can be re-grooved at least once, 8mm maybe not at all. Cost increment is insignificant (in the overall scheme of things.)

Do not replace it with more teak! Just make it a fiberglass deck as god intended and enjoy the lack of maintenance. You can re-use the original rigging by using G10 pads to compensate for the teak you removed. 

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With a regular salt water washdown and occasional detergent/bleach scrub teak is easy to maintain, if it starts out in good condition.

If you let it get crappy, or (over) scrub with a bristle brush,................

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Last year I popped about 1500 bungs on my teak deck, unscrewed the fasteners, then pulled off each plank, intact... 

..Then I repaired the delamination that set me on the job in the first place,  then filled all the old holes from the fasteners, covered the whole thing in a fresh layer of heavy biaxial cloth and epoxy...   Now I've got a perfectly good, fiberglass deck.  

And for some reason I didn't stop there:  I bored out all the old fastener holes in my teak planks, plugged them with newer, bigger bungs, recut the rabbits a little deeper and wider,  sanded the boards til they looked flawless, and glued those old planks back down to the deck with TDS's epoxy made for this purpose. 

Now I've got a "modern" zero-fastener teak deck.    It just doesn't look it, because it's got bungs where all the old fasteners used to be.  

It looked PERFECT for the first few months, but staining around the bungs is starting to re-appear. :(   That was a little heartbreaking.     I thought I had bored and sanded my way to clean teak.     But at least the 1500 holes in the deck are gone now.    

Not sure what the point of this is.  Cautionary tale about the stains?   I guess I still like it better than a plastic deck.  

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On 2/25/2018 at 6:21 PM, Slim said:

Do not replace it with more teak! Just make it a fiberglass deck as god intended and enjoy the lack of maintenance. You can re-use the original rigging by using G10 pads to compensate for the teak you removed. 

Even fibreglass decks need maintenance in the long run.  Non-skid wears out, and while re-doing it is possible for the DIY'er it does take a fair bit of work to get it right.

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My formula for a Teak Remover Solution, works on all types of decks:

 

1 Gallon of Gasoline / 4 Litres Petrol

3 Gallons of Kerosene / 12 Litres of Parafin

 

 

 

Mix well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spread liberally around affected areas. Let soak.

 

 

 

Light match. Throw onto affected area. Problem solved!

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On 2/23/2018 at 12:16 PM, Sea4see said:

Teak deck on my Hallberg-Rassy 312.. the diffficult work... Advise?

https://youtu.be/iPfz5uai2Ho

Hey Gabriel, thanks for the  link to your videos.  I did the same thing to my mid-70's Tayana 37 a few years ago, and it was a pain in the butt but well worth the effort.  Not sure what your plan is, but we chose not to put teak back on.  Too many issues with wet core from all the screws, so we replaced all the core, glassed all the original skins back in place and painted the boat with non-skid.  I'll be sure to keep an eye on your projects, and good luck with whatever you decide to do. 

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On 2/23/2018 at 12:34 PM, slug zitski said:

Didnt watch your video....

 

the normal method to remove the teak planking is with a circular saw.

set the blade depth to teak thickness.

cut kerfs perpendicular to planks...across the deck 

perhaps 100mm apart 

take a chisel...wide chisel ...and break the teak apart.

use a randon orbital with #40 to remove teak residue and adhesive.

fill all the old holes with epoxy

dont use screws to hold the new deck down  

What he said except a random orbital will take a month of sundays.  If you check it out and there is no wet core after removal then give it a light pass with a proper grinder(preferably a 7" but a 5" will be more useful for other jobs) held flat to the surface and a 36-40 grit fiber disk on a flat backing plate.  Especially if you're using adhesive to bed new teak, or you have to dig in to the coring, only time I'd consider using a sander would be if I was going to paint/gelcoat and the surface was in good condition except for the adhesive. I'd use a dustless shroud on the grinder but for a one off job it might not be worth it.  If you're under cover, buy a roll of cheap single sided corrugated carboard, and mask side of the cabin top at least, this will protect against bumps/scrapes, dust getting in portlights etc, and provide a small amount of protection for mistakes with the grinder.  Tape off any hatches/openings to below if you can live without going inside the boat until the job is done.  This will save you a lot of cleanup.  

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Don't use a grinder, use a disk sander/polisher - a very different tool. Grinders run at high RPM - 7K and the like. Sanders run at 1K - 2K (should be variable speed).

This is what you want - use the coarsest sanding disks you can find;

image.png.b4b92552e4e8abfce7b60b67d5c25b77.png

Do NOT use one of these or you will destroy your deck with cuts & gouges.

image.png.23a236b195a3a31b91333be70c095453.png

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Don't use a grinder, use a disk sander/polisher - a very different tool. Grinders run at high RPM - 7K and the like. Sanders run at 1K - 2K (should be variable speed).

This is what you want - use the coarsest sanding disks you can find;

 

Do NOT use one of these or you will destroy your deck with cuts & gouges.

 

A 5 or a 7" grinder is the one I would use, prefer variable speed is really nice, and a better(lighter) brand(Metabo/Fein etc) but can be done without it.  Polisher is too bloody slow and heavy if you're going to put teak on again.  Keep it flat, keep it light and moving and avoid dig ins, just skimming the adhesive/filler sticking up above the filled screw holes/giving a little tooth to the gelcoat.  I wouldn't use the coarsest available(24 grit), 36-40 grit at the lowest.  

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Every time I have seen a grinder used on a boat hull or deck - every time - it has been a colossal fuck up. I have seen hulls ruined by using a grinder instead of a big sander.

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54 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Every time I have seen a grinder used on a boat hull or deck - every time - it has been a colossal fuck up. I have seen hulls ruined by using a grinder instead of a big sander.

Hull no(well unless you're doing an actual repair, but that's outside the scope of work under discussion)    This is under the assumption teak is going back on, a requirement I clearly noted in my post, and the OP has some common sense(don't do it if teak isn't in the plan), there may also be patches of recoring to do and the grinder will do those as well.   You can run the grinder slower if you spring for the variable speed one(and it'll still be lighter) but you can't run the buffer faster(and it'll still be heavier), Either one will come in within 50$ to buy depending on which is on sale.    I have seen a hull butchered with a small RO sander when it was just being prepped for paint(used to be a beautiful boat too...).   The owner complained to the guy working on it that it was bad, the "painter" said it was a 6' paint job, not a 2" paint job, and someone else in the peanut gallery watching the disaster unfold piped up that it was actually a 60' paint job(he was correct), even from where we were watching from you could see the ugly.   There is no limit to the damage potential for abrasives in the wrong hands.  

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2 hours ago, jgbrown said:

Hull no(well unless you're doing an actual repair, but that's outside the scope of work under discussion)    This is under the assumption teak is going back on, a requirement I clearly noted in my post, and the OP has some common sense(don't do it if teak isn't in the plan), there may also be patches of recoring to do and the grinder will do those as well.   You can run the grinder slower if you spring for the variable speed one(and it'll still be lighter) but you can't run the buffer faster(and it'll still be heavier), Either one will come in within 50$ to buy depending on which is on sale.    I have seen a hull butchered with a small RO sander when it was just being prepped for paint(used to be a beautiful boat too...).   The owner complained to the guy working on it that it was bad, the "painter" said it was a 6' paint job, not a 2" paint job, and someone else in the peanut gallery watching the disaster unfold piped up that it was actually a 60' paint job(he was correct), even from where we were watching from you could see the ugly.   There is no limit to the damage potential for abrasives in the wrong hands.  

I work  with metal boats,  we sandblast adhesive off. 

A grinder and a soft pad would work with a skilled operator,  but its  very messy.  A dust cloud 

A proffesional random orb , 60 grit , with a vacume dust removal is more civilized 

a  stiff Wire wheel , turned at low rpm , is very good for removing sika flex type adhesive  and may be very useful on  a fiberglass deck with molded nonskid pattern ..

since the bonding area is so large its not necessary for 100 percent of the old  adhesive  to be removed. 

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Didnt watch your video....

 

the normal method to remove the teak planking is with a circular saw.

set the blade depth to teak thickness.

cut kerfs perpendicular to planks...across the deck 

perhaps 100mm apart 

take a chisel...wide chisel ...and break the teak apart.

use a randon orbital with #40 to remove teak residue and adhesive.

fill all the old holes with epoxy

dont use screws to hold the new deck down  

Exactly, but it depends what the deck was put down with. I removed the decks on a Hans Christian 38T a few years back that was put down on a bed of polysulphide rubber and it had actually done a fine job and was pretty easy to remove the planks by just prying up but when I replaced the decks on a Cherubini 44 many years ago it had been glued down with epoxy over a plywood sub deck and for that one  I used the skil saw method and then an adze rather than a chisel, worked great and then I laid the new deck also with epoxy but no fasteners and a full depth caulk seam with bond breaker.

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I laid the new deck also with epoxy but no fasteners and a full depth caulk seam with bond breaker.

Steve why would you put bondbreaker between a full depth joint sealant and deck (ply sub deck) with narrow planks having minimal movement? Wouldn't that encourage moisture to track/sit under the sealant?

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Anyone used a ocillating/mult-tool with any success?

mj-618_348_the-do-it-all-power-tool-makita-multi-tool.jpg

Never used one but if I was going to cut out a bulkhead it's the first thing I'd buy.

I doubt it would do well removing a teak deck.

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mj-618_348_the-do-it-all-power-tool-makita-multi-tool.jpg

Never used one but if I was going to cut out a bulkhead it's the first thing I'd buy.

I doubt it would do well removing a teak deck.

I love my oscsaw (I've got the Bosch 3A model). It will truly do what other saws can't plus a lot more but it's a finish tool, not an intensive demolition tool

God, I hate the "new and improved" site software.  What a PITA just to try and respond to a post with pictures...

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I have been doing the same job on a 80ft yacht with a traditional deck. See the circular saw technique in action......

 

 

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The arguments against a teak deck are many- cost, weight, maintenance, leaks for starters, but they certainly can be attractive.

Applying and maintaining a glass and paint (Awlgrip or Kiwigrip) is lots easier.

How about doing only the cockpit in teak?  That's where the audience is.

  

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Even there I'd be inclined to install that new fake teak decking - some of it is amazingly convincing.

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7 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

 I'd be inclined to install that new fake teak decking - some of it is amazingly convincing.

Sloop so are fake tits.

For both, give me the real McCoy any day.

 

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The difference is that tits maintain themselves. ;)

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I had this done professionally and replaced it with Kiwigrip. I'm pretty happy with the outcome. Even after the glass, filler and paint I think I saved over 300lbs. 

I looked at synthetic. It looked OK from a distance, but was heavy and looked fake up close. Replacement teak was near the replacement cost of the boat. 

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On ‎3‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 12:07 AM, jack_sparrow said:

Steve why would you put bondbreaker between a full depth joint sealant and deck (ply sub deck) with narrow planks having minimal movement? Wouldn't that encourage moisture to track/sit under the sealant?

When I was an apprentice many moons ago we did many teak decks on new custom boats we built and we always rabbeted one edge to butt up against the in rabbeted edge of its neighbor, this certainly made it easier to lay a deck but it halves the decks life, not a big deal if the deck is thick but mostly we used 10 -12mm. I never really gave it a thought until many years later when doing repair work I saw how short the lifespan could be on a deck done this way, especially when screwed and plugged as well. So, even though it is more difficult to lay a deck using temporary spacers and no permanent fasteners the lifespan is much longer but the caulk seam is deeper and most manufacturers of caulks specifically for teak decks recommend a bond breaker in the bottom of the seam and it does make sense. The theory is that if there is movement in the planking and the caulk is bonded on three sides it is more likely to fail on one side than if it is only bonded to two sides. Now there should be plenty of elongation in the caulk to accept any movement you are likely to get with a thinner deck epoxy bonded to the sub deck anyway for it to not matter but with a thicker deck maybe not. I have seen enough decks where the bond has failed in places on the edges and let water in so I do think it is less likely to happen with a bond breaker but I have done it both ways. I think that the thicker the deck the more it can move and the more likely you are to have the caulk fail on the edge, even if glued down with epoxy. I did a teak deck years ago that was only 5mm thick, glued down with epoxy and the seams payed with epoxy/graphite and it lasted 20 years before it wore too thin but caused no problems and the owner just painted over it with a kiwigrip type product without removing it. I think that even though the caulks have good elongation teak is a difficult material to bond to without much surface area like the edge of a thin plank that it needs all the help it can get. back in the old days we had much better products for degreasing the seams, we used to use carbon tetrachloride but they banned that then we used methylene chloride but they took that away so now we use acetone. We used to use two part polysulphide rubber to caulk the seams, now we use a one part blend, easier to use but better, probably not.

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40 minutes ago, Steve said:

When I was an apprentice many moons ago we did many teak decks on new custom boats we built and we always rabbeted one edge to butt up against the in rabbeted edge of its neighbor, this certainly made it easier to lay a deck but it halves the decks life, not a big deal if the deck is thick but mostly we used 10 -12mm. I never really gave it a thought until many years later when doing repair work I saw how short the lifespan could be on a deck done this way, especially when screwed and plugged as well. So, even though it is more difficult to lay a deck using temporary spacers and no permanent fasteners the lifespan is much longer but the caulk seam is deeper and most manufacturers of caulks specifically for teak decks recommend a bond breaker in the bottom of the seam and it does make sense. The theory is that if there is movement in the planking and the caulk is bonded on three sides it is more likely to fail on one side than if it is only bonded to two sides. Now there should be plenty of elongation in the caulk to accept any movement you are likely to get with a thinner deck epoxy bonded to the sub deck anyway for it to not matter but with a thicker deck maybe not. I have seen enough decks where the bond has failed in places on the edges and let water in so I do think it is less likely to happen with a bond breaker but I have done it both ways. I think that the thicker the deck the more it can move and the more likely you are to have the caulk fail on the edge, even if glued down with epoxy. I did a teak deck years ago that was only 5mm thick, glued down with epoxy and the seams payed with epoxy/graphite and it lasted 20 years before it wore too thin but caused no problems and the owner just painted over it with a kiwigrip type product without removing it. I think that even though the caulks have good elongation teak is a difficult material to bond to without much surface area like the edge of a thin plank that it needs all the help it can get. back in the old days we had much better products for degreasing the seams, we used to use carbon tetrachloride but they banned that then we used methylene chloride but they took that away so now we use acetone. We used to use two part polysulphide rubber to caulk the seams, now we use a one part blend, easier to use but better, probably not.

Yes..

 

.some deck pros cut no rabbet ..none...the planks are butted .

 Once cured a long batten and a circular saw with a custom blade are used to cut a  caulking grove, a kerf ,  ,  whose depth is 80 percent of plank thickness. 

All odd shapes are cut with a template and router 

This gives a long lasting teak deck 

fasteners are not needed on a teak deck .  For small trim that cant be vacumed or clamped,  screws are used..after cure these screws are removed and the holes plugged 

 

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43 minutes ago, Steve said:

....The theory is that if there is movement in the planking and the caulk is bonded on three sides it is more likely to fail on one side than if it is only bonded to two sides. Now there should be plenty of elongation in the caulk to accept any movement you are likely to get with a thinner deck epoxy bonded to the sub deck anyway for it to not matter but with a thicker deck maybe not....

Steve thanks..much appreciate that .

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22 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Yes..

 

.some deck pros cut no rabbet ..none...the planks are butted .

 Once cured a long batten and a circular saw with a custom blade are used to cut a  caulking grove, a kerf ,  ,  whose depth is 80 percent of plank thickness. 

All odd shapes are cut with a template and router 

This gives a long lasting teak deck 

fasteners are not needed on a teak deck .  For small trim that cant be vacumed or clamped,  screws are used..after cure these screws are removed and the holes plugged 

 

On a sprung deck you always need to use some  temporary fasteners but it is very important to go back with a syringe once they are removed and inject epoxy into the holes and if they are in the seams, epoxy seal the bottom of the entire seam. I have seen decks done where yhey were screwed in the conventional manner but then the screws removed and the holes plugged to the full depth of the plank which is also a reasonable solution, still wise to inject the hole in the sub deck with un thickened epoxy before plugging though. I once restored an actual laid deck that was directly on the beams on a 47ft yawl where the seams were gone and I used the method Slug mentioned to restore the seam except with a router. It was a ridiculous project because it should have been ripped off and replaced with plywood and glass/epoxy and painted imho but the owner wanted to save a deck that was not worth saving. Anyway I found using the long batten to be too tedious to ever want to do that again, I used a 24ft steel angle as a batten with segmented plywood tabs screwed to it and bags of lead shot and a few screws. I often use steel or aluminum when I want a long fair batten.

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They use a long fir , spruce plank that is kerfed like a comb .

the saw is a plung saw .

they have offset spacers to place the batten circular saw correctly over the joint 

it is more work 

alejandro , the deck guy , likes it because after the kerf, caulking groove , is cut the sides of the teak plank are virgin clean teak...no bonding adhesive contamination 

it also give perfect, even width caulking joints  

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Strip it off is one thing. I had it professionally done a few years back where the teak deck was replaced.

I got a lovely new teak deck, sadly the gel-coat is covered with grinding and sanding marks from when the old teak was removed. From one UK most known and rewarded boatyards, I did expect more. Got angry everytime I look at the 50K teak deck. I pointed this out during and after the work was completed, without any response from the yard. 

My advice: take your time, don't rush the stripping of the old teak deck. If someone is doing it for you: hold a large part of the cost back until the job is complete. It is really expensive to rectify any damage done. 

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11 hours ago, Mogle said:

I got a lovely new teak deck, sadly the gel-coat is covered with grinding and sanding marks from when the old teak was removed

Providing it was filled and faired before laying new teak what is wrong with that? How does one go about removing a deck to expose a pristine gel coat, magic?

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I read that as being on adjacent surfaces like the cabin sides.

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If so no wonder he is pissed. However I can't imagine anyone doing that and if accidental not rectifying it and if not rectifying it anyone paying them in full.

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Kerfing after laying, that is a real skill as one fuck up can cost a LOT of money.  I have cut straight kerfs for the same effect on plywood and thats still not easy. 

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On 4/10/2018 at 12:24 AM, jack_sparrow said:

Providing it was filled and faired before laying new teak what is wrong with that? How does one go about removing a deck to expose a pristine gel coat, magic?

Yes, I am pissed off by this fuckup. The work was done by a well-known yard in the Hamble. Without given their name, they are probably known as the best in yacht restoration in UK. When I pointed this out - they were not interested in rectifying the fault. I was asked to mark the deck or gel-coat with tape, it took me a few hours mark the deck. Next time I saw the yacht, they had removed the tape, but not fix the gel-cote. The teak-deck is fantastic, but all the gel-cote marks? Next time if the is a next time I am going to use a surveyor, before and after the work is done.  

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On 3/23/2018 at 4:56 AM, jack_sparrow said:

Anyone used a ocillating/mult-tool with any success?

mj-618_348_the-do-it-all-power-tool-makita-multi-tool.jpg

Cost you a fortune in blades, slow and you'll probably burn it out before you finish the job.  Get brutal, but with a touch of finesse.

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Never pay full, save 10 or 5 procent to pay after check.
I used to save one obvious spot that was damaged and fixed that a day or hours before delivery, so the client would focus on that.

But the damages could already have been there, and you only notice it now, happened to me too.

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Has anyone stood/walked on cork decks?  A friend of mine whose boat is on the hard (and will be for a while), installed them last year but has no Idea how they will perform.  Looks great but kind of looks like it'll 'chunk out' easily but who knows?  No idea what if any sealer was used.

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