Sign in to follow this  
Mozzy Sails

RS800 Video

Recommended Posts

20 knot northeasters feel a little colder in the Northern Hemisphere... chilly day out on Chichester Harbour, but we had the place to ourselves. 

[ ]

[/ ]

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good stuff. We were out saturday, lighter but shiftier than what you had. Broke ice off the boat and had to get changed in the car park. Sunny tho. Brr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Daniel Holman we were actually sailing quite far up your way, it's best bit of water at half tide despite being a little shifty up near Peacock. Thankfully wasn't as windy on Sunday as the forecast. 15-20 knots, flat water, wind against tide, blue skies; was almost perfect except it being 1 degree! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, you Brits are hardcore. It's like 50 deg F in the morning, and even though I know it will warm up to 65 later in the day, that's just too cold for me and I just go back inside for "second breakfast" instead.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny you should say that, at the moment pretty much the whole country is shut down for a few inches of snow. Certainly doesn't feel hardcore, although it was mighty cold on the water last Sunday. 

I remember when youth sailing chatting to other sailors from Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland and seeing pictures of them pushing boats out past the ice to find some sea to sail on; that's hardcore! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/27/2018 at 9:30 AM, mozzy656 said:

@Daniel Holman we were actually sailing quite far up your way, it's best bit of water at half tide despite being a little shifty up near Peacock. Thankfully wasn't as windy on Sunday as the forecast. 15-20 knots, flat water, wind against tide, blue skies; was almost perfect except it being 1 degree! 

Ha I'm actually a southampton water person, but 14ing takes us to chi harbour a lot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another little video. Much less wind this week, struggling to build power most of the time, but not as cold thankfully!

Got a second camera too (Yi 4k Lite) which seems to have much better quality and higher frame rte for slow-mo. Old GoPro 960 is on the boom and new camera is on the rack an my head. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made a little video of my race from work to get out for the first evening sail of 2018. It's well over a month until evening racing starts, but for me the first dusk sail of the year is a significant mark of spring; far ore so than the equinox or changing of the clocks.

Got me thinking, here it's impossible to sail in the winter evenings, going dark at 4-5pm? But maybe the lower latitudes can sail all year round in the evening? Does that happen anywhere?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not all plain sailing. First time out in over 20 knots and finding it a little challenging. Unfortunately the jib tack snapped on the first upwind so we didn't get a chance to put in an decent manoeuvres. Practised decent t bit of body dragging though! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one! Shame about the mechanical. What is it with going into windward on the corners in big wind. So much of it is psychology I think. Tried to go out on weds but main kept pulling out of track... the struggle was real. And sweary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely all in the head, we're through the gybe and should be safe. The problem is I get in my head that I have to race across the boat, whereas in reality I should be taking it more chilled and focusing on matching steering to our movement. So paranoid about hitting the wire quickly that I forget to steer the boat up in to the breeze on the exit! 

Then we just pilled in to the first wave before getting in the straps, unfortunate timing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not an 800 video, but hope you enjoy nonetheless. Third race of the day in a building breeze. Weather mast read 30 in the gust but more like low 20s most the time. Nice and warm finally! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit of evening sailing put on our own. Nationals start in 7 days time at Weymouth. Last sail before then will be a pursuit race at our home club before packing up. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last race before the nationals was 'interesting'. We managed to stick the bow in to a wave in the pre-start whilst doing some practice gybes out in the wave of the infamous Winner Bank. Looking back it was pretty stupid to be fooling around there just a few days before the nationals, but fortunately we go the kite wrapped away quick and on to the board to stop the mast bouncing on the bottom in the shallow water and waves. 

The pursuit race was perfect for us. Plenty of deep spinnaker reaches and some fast two sail legs. The hardest part was the multiple gybes going dead downwind in to the Thorney channel and back up, just as we were catching the main bunch of the fleet. After that though it was back up to the open harbour and we took a comfortable win. 

Then we took that form in to the nationals!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've promised the class a few videos on how we took our 10 year old boat, sorted it's systems and got her championship winning standard. The aim of these videos is to inspire those thinking of trying out the class to get involved. Or those who have a boat but need a bit of guidance to get it sorted and out racing. 

As the videos are aimed to encourage other in to the class, then I guess it makes sense to post them here, for those outside the class racing who are interested in the boat. Maybe I should have started a new thread, as this is getting a bit stale, but I don't want to cram up the whole subforum and equally it seems a few people return to this thread to watch the videos. 

First video below is about what to look out for when buying a used RS800 and some of the first jobs you're likely to want to do. I'm going to follow up with a few videos on the control systems. These are quite specific to the RS800, but there might be stuff in there for other sailing boat too. 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another video, this time on setting up off-boom sheeting for the crew on the RS800. 

The class previously only allowed deck sheeting with a cleat, and the crew wasn't allowed to play the main. The aim was to keep the class competitive for those with smaller crews. But in 2017 the class allowed off-boom sheeting with the crew taking the sheet. With ever more youth sailors being used to this way of sailing from 29er and 49er it made sense to allow it. But to keep sheet loads low and keep the class accessible for smaller crews it was decided to make a 3:1 purchase mandatory in the system. 

The 3:1 system has quite a lot of sheet to move, and with open deck and no nets on the racks the sheet can easily was out the boat. Travelling at speed it becomes very difficult to pull the sheets back and an even play the sheets. 

This video shows how we set up our off-boom sheeting with elastic take up to make the long sheets manageable. The system should be transferable to most skiff type boats with the idea stolen from what the top 49er crews are using. 

The class doesn't allow split strops on the bridle, just to keep things simple, this video shows the single adjustable splice we use to change bridle height; the same used on most 29ers. 

I hope you enjoy :) 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We got out yesterday despite the weather warnings. Forecast was coming down all the time in the second half of last week, so it looked do-able, but could get challenging if we got caught in the back end of the rain.  

We got an extra coffee at the club, as the wind had increased sharply from 15 to 20+ knots and we wondered if it would continue building on that trend. But after 30 minutes of discussing which forecast was correct the wind seemed to have stabilised to about 20 knots. Plus the rain had stopped, so we rigged to go out. Club racing was still on although only a couple of boats chose to go out. We didn't race, but just went for a sail up and down enjoying the near full tide in the harbour. 

It was wind against tide, which made the waters right near the launching beach the most difficult in the main channel. But once out and past that we tucked ourselves up near the windward shore where the water was flatter for bear aways. 

The boat handling was fairly ropy as I was trying a new gybing technique, plus we'd moved where my trapeze lines are routed to... probably not ideal to be changing things up in this weather, but it was our last sail before the inlands and I was keen to test it all out.   

Anyway, we got out and back with no capsizes or breakages, and a relatively controlled return to the leeward shore by dropping our main. Just as we were de-rigging it got really fresh and they 40 knots on the race box! Glad we missed that.

Short but sweet clip, enjoy! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This tips video is super simple, but massively effective. Get your downhaul working as intended! I think t would be pretty relevant to any dinghy using lots of cunningham and a bolt rope / mast track. 

Like many skiffs the downhaul / cunningham is critical in RS800s for anything over 15 knots and once above 20 knots you will want to be cranking it on as hard as you can. The difficulty is that the standard 2x2x2 (8:1) cascade struggles for range and friction in the bolt rope leaves many sailing downwind with tension still in the cunno, de-powering the main when max power is wanted.

This is the third in a series covering the simple improvements and renovations we made to RS800 1144 to make get her systems working smooth and reliable.

Comment if there is anything else you'd like to know.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool stuff. Keep'em coming!

Regarding purchases, I've always traded more cascades for less range (more cascades of single blocks, instead of using a lot of doubles/triples) trying to be very precise in the splices and in range setup, because it makes the system much more slippery :) But as you say It's alway a compromise. ANd I have no Rs experience, I'm talking from moth tuning prespective.

 

Not really RS specific, but I have instead zero competence in choosing the material of control lines and sheets (line cover in particular), so any indication /advice in that would be great. And, moreover, are good ratchet blocks all equal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the range would be just about workable if you did every splice as short as possible, the trouble is we have to change the position of our racks depending on crew righting moment. This means the spare line in the system can be lost as the control lines are lead out wider. The easy way to accommodate that is to put a longer strop in through the eye in the sail (the first purchase in the system). This system you can extend that strop by 4-6 inches and still have plenty of range. 

Plus, it's only one extra block too, so it doesn't add loads of friction. 

Finally, the issue with easing the downhaul is that its not until you have eased kicker and main and sailed for a seconds downwind that the bolt rope moves up the track and all tension has gone from the system. The problem we were having was we'd ease the downhaul before the mark, then have to ease it again after hoisting as the sail had moved up and was now under tension again. A well lubricated mast track helps but until you'd full eased the main it's not going to move up completely. A strong release elastic means you can let off a load of downhaul and the bungy will hold the block up proving slack for the sail to move further up as you bear away and hoist (sorry if that's awkwardly explained). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 17mika said:

Not really RS specific, but I have instead zero competence in choosing the material of control lines and sheets (line cover in particular), so any indication /advice in that would be great. And, moreover, are good ratchet blocks all equal?

We're using Rooster EasySplice for the control lines, I think it's an english braids manufactured rope. It can be made continuous with no change in diameter. 

EasySplice Video

Sheets we're using Rooster AllSpec Pro, which again I think is an english braids rope called D-Racer 16. It tapers really nice, comes in nice colours and the dynema core is colour matched to the outer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Longer video, with a bit of split view this week. 

Trialling out new trapeze elastic routing for myself, with the aim to have the wires a little further out to make them easier to grab as I launch myself over the side!

Also trying a new gybing technique when I got out on the handle rather than hooking in to the hoop then taking up the slack as I got out. When the wires are low it seems a lot easier to grab for the handle rather than reach down to the hoop. The downside is you have to wait for the crew to hook you on. 

Going to try lower trapeze handles in the coming weeks and hopefully a shorter length between handle and hoop will make hooking on possible by myself even at the back of the rack.

Anyway, I hope that's of some interest to you, well done if you made it all the way through to the end!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this