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Anyone got any good picture of the chicken chute up? How often does the boat you are on use it? Is it worth having? Looking into getting one for my boat.

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The days of 2.2 oz cloth with wire luffs.  Haven't seen one in decades.  You know you're in for good times when that is called for!

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My chicken chute is a 1.5 oz assy about 100 square feet smaller than my normal chutes.

 

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7 hours ago, thistle3466 said:

Anyone got any good picture of the chicken chute up? How often does the boat you are on use it? Is it worth having? Looking into getting one for my boat.

Looking for a heavy weather kite for the hobie? You should absolutely have one. Make sure it's cut pretty flat to let you more the bow around in waves and of a heavy enough material (1.5+ oz) that you won't feel bad flogging it when the inevitable happens. 

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Narrow shoulders, flat cut and 1.5oz. Actually close reaches in light air, put it up by mistake one night and it worked pretty good. This chute is 30+ yo but still looks good since it is so rarely used. (this pic is from the mid-90's)

rocket 1990s.jpg

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8 hours ago, thistle3466 said:

Is it worth having? Looking into getting one for my boat.

what boat ?

chicken chutes were for apparent wind speed that really ain't seen with today's lighter boats .

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6 hours ago, sailronin said:

My chicken chute is a 1.5 oz assy about 100 square feet smaller than my normal chutes.

 

Thanks for the video! Looking at adding an A kite down the road!

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1 hour ago, jackolantern said:

 

Looking for a heavy weather kite for the hobie? You should absolutely have one. Make sure it's cut pretty flat to let you more the bow around in waves and of a heavy enough material (1.5+ oz) that you won't feel bad flogging it when the inevitable happens. 

Good point, the boat came with a 1.5 oz reaching kite that i have only had out of the bag once. Laid it out with the normal S2 and it really is not much smaller, just way heavier cloth.

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19 minutes ago, ~HHN92~ said:

Narrow shoulders, flat cut and 1.5oz. Actually close reaches in light air, put it up by mistake one night and it worked pretty good. This chute is 30+ yo but still looks good since it is so rarely used. (this pic is from the mid-90's)

rocket 1990s.jpg

Awesome shot! What was it blowing when this photo was taken?

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15 minutes ago, Mid said:

what boat ?

chicken chutes were for apparent wind speed that really ain't seen with today's lighter boats .

Hobie 33 

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1 minute ago, thistle3466 said:

Hobie 33 

It's not the straight line apparent wind you're worried about but the apparent wind when you're stopped. 

 

3466, with your boat just put the fole forward a tad and tweak the outboard end a little low. Bow up 3-5 degrees and send it. 

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1 minute ago, jackolantern said:

It's not the straight line apparent wind you're worried about but the apparent wind when you're stopped. 

 

3466, with your boat just put the fole forward a tad and tweak the outboard end a little low. Bow up 3-5 degrees and send it. 

I'm always down for a full send! I honestly was not sure if the boat needs a spinnaker like such since they get up and go so fast.

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 jackolantern has the answer  

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We run an s3 as a shy kite on the moore 24. It’s a small kite than the class runner s2, and allows a wider grove. We tested this in up to 36 tws in 2015, it’s was near the upper limit, but so were we. I can post a pic in the morning it’s basically a kite without the shoulders. 

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10 hours ago, PinkSpinnaker said:

Awesome shot! What was it blowing when this photo was taken?

I think low to mid 20's, I was not on the boat then, the previous owner sent the pic to me. From what I've been told they wiped-out right after the pic was taken, coming into a mark rounding.

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12 hours ago, PinkSpinnaker said:

I'm always down for a full send! I honestly was not sure if the boat needs a spinnaker like such since they get up and go so fast.

Apparent wind being as far forward as it is, you want a flatter sail. An S3 or S5 depending on how deep your inventory is. 

I'm aware of an Express 37 which did the transpac with an S1 (light VMG), S2 (Std Runner), S3 (bow up surfing), S4 (heavy running) and S6 (Survival running).

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A "Survival Spinnaker"?

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2 hours ago, ~HHN92~ said:

I think low to mid 20's, I was not on the boat then, the previous owner sent the pic to me. From what I've been told they wiped-out right after the pic was taken, coming into a mark rounding.

Better pic from a couple of years ago.

 

rocket .5oz chute.jpg

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56 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

A "Survival Spinnaker"?

Yeah, the kite you use to decide how long you can survive with a kite up....

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That pink chute is not only heavier cloth, but much much more flatter than the other chutes with narrower shoulders as well. I couldnt imagine going with anything else.  The other chutes will do just fine in 24-28 knots off the breeze. Craig

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15 hours ago, ~HHN92~ said:

Narrow shoulders, flat cut and 1.5oz. Actually close reaches in light air, put it up by mistake one night and it worked pretty good. This chute is 30+ yo but still looks good since it is so rarely used. (this pic is from the mid-90's)

rocket 1990s.jpg

I didn't know they made that boat in a yawl model!  Lookin' good.

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1 hour ago, ~HHN92~ said:

Better pic from a couple of years ago.

 

rocket .5oz chute.jpg

strapped much :-) 

 

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On 2/26/2018 at 7:17 PM, PinkSpinnaker said:

Anyone got any good picture of the chicken chute up? How often does the boat you are on use it? Is it worth having? Looking into getting one for my boat.

A small spinaker is beautiful for cruising . It is much easier to contain in a spin sock.

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1 hour ago, hoofhearted said:

That pink chute is not only heavier cloth, but much much more flatter than the other chutes with narrower shoulders as well. I couldnt imagine going with anything else.  The other chutes will do just fine in 24-28 knots off the breeze. Craig

Thanks craig, did you guys ever put up the pink one? 

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1 hour ago, Deed said:

strapped much :-) 

 

Squeezing to get into the finish line at the basin, water to the left, dirt to the right.

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In this years BYC Mac we had up the 1.5 80% 30 year old nylon chute for hours. In 29 to 36 kn TWS. Flat wake, spray straight out off the bow. We have gone through a lot of 3/4 .5 and .6 chutes over the years. We carry three chutes  now a 1/2 oz runner, .6 all around and the 1.5. The 1.5 goes up to save the others from blowing up, so we can still go fast in lighter winds later in the race. Ordered a new heavy air flat chute this year as the old 1.5 was breathing to much and slowing us down. Thing about flat chutes in tippy boats is in heavy air they want to fly at a close reaching angle at times. This rounds up the boat. I’ve seen many take downs called because this and the flogging 1.5 up in to much wind.

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A boat I raced on a few years ago had a 2.2 oz storm kite affectionately dubbed "the tractor". Felt like a pair of denim jeans. The crew was certain we would loose the rig long before we ever blew up that kite. 

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2 hours ago, jeff carver said:

2.2 oz Hood flankers were the nuts 

Jeez 2.2 Oz that’s nuts. Ever blow one up?

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4 minutes ago, Drifter said:

A boat I raced on a few years ago had a 2.2 oz storm kite affectionately dubbed "the tractor". Felt like a pair of denim jeans. The crew was certain we would loose the rig long before we ever blew up that kite. 

That’s amazing. Bet that thing was heavy as hell.

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Banks Starcut, great heavy air running chute in their day

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5 minutes ago, PinkSpinnaker said:

That’s amazing. Bet that thing was heavy as hell.

 

It wasn't so bad when dry, as it was a smaller kite. But once it was wet we figured it weighed about 60-70 lbs and inevitably it was always wet for one reason or another when it was time to hoist it. 

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I don't think this is a chicken chute, but the next few minutes would have been pretty foul...

Image result for BOAT WITH SPINNAKER IN STRONG WINDS

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9 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

I don't think this is a chicken chute, but the next few minutes would have been pretty foul...

 

The boat in front has gybed - he's just following suit.

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Boat I did some sailing on had a Cuben Fiber A5. Pretty unpleasant sail to pack into a spinnaker turtle when it was soaking wet. The fabric was rip your fingernails off kind of heavy. 

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Maybe this will help.

Image result for shooting chickens

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9 hours ago, jeff carver said:

2.2 oz Hood flankers were the nuts 

Doesn't count as a chicken chute without wire luffs!  Oh and "do not open until 35 knots" written on the bag.

Sailed with a few of these,  never blew one up,  but taking them down in 40+ was guaranteed to get your attention.

Did blow a 2.2 star cut without the wire luffs in a knockdown in 60 knots south of Tasmania though.  Ah the Mewstone Rock Race,  I wonder why they don't do that one anymore.

TUBBY

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16 hours ago, PinkSpinnaker said:

Thanks craig, did you guys ever put up the pink one? 

Yes we put it up.  On really tight reaches , the pink  was awesome, a lot of other boats in PHRF could not carry a chute to the pink one, and we would make gains when they would follow suit and drive way down trying to carry with us.  The staysail was perfect for balancing the helm with it up.  We used it in heavy air on a deep run once, probably around 25-30, and felt the regular chute did better getting us op on plane . In light aire you can almost go to weather with pink up.

Pic below is regular chute in about 18-22kts breeze.  Right during a gybe.  Good times.

 

 

Hobie Chute.jpg

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14 hours ago, Drifter said:

... The crew was certain we would loose the rig long before we ever blew up that kite. 

Which is why we stopped using 1.5oz and 2.2 oz kites as chicken chutes on one-tonners in the late 80's... as rigs got spindlier, they would far outlast the rig, esp when the bow slammed into a wave and the boat came almost to a stop - the rig would keep going. We used a 3rd string 3/4 oz for 25+... we'd prefer it blow before the rig. The kite-as-fusible-link theory.

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23 hours ago, Soley said:

Yeah, the kite you use to decide how long you can survive with a kite up....

Yes, also known as the 'deity' method:  We put them up, God takes them down...

- Stumbling

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5 hours ago, hoofhearted said:

Yes we put it up.  On really tight reaches , the pink  was awesome, a lot of other boats in PHRF could not carry a chute to the pink one, and we would make gains when they would follow suit and drive way down trying to carry with us.  The staysail was perfect for balancing the helm with it up.  We used it in heavy air on a deep run once, probably around 25-30, and felt the regular chute did better getting us op on plane . In light aire you can almost go to weather with pink up.

Pic below is regular chute in about 18-22kts breeze.  Right during a gybe.  Good times.

 

 

Hobie Chute.jpg

While we are on the subject on what sails are what. The Hot Yellow S2 kite, is that a PHRF or OD kite? Is there any difference in size between the two mains? 

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9 hours ago, TUBBY said:

Doesn't count as a chicken chute without wire luffs!  Oh and "do not open until 35 knots" written on the bag.

Sailed with a few of these,  never blew one up,  but taking them down in 40+ was guaranteed to get your attention.

Did blow a 2.2 star cut without the wire luffs in a knockdown in 60 knots south of Tasmania though.  Ah the Mewstone Rock Race,  I wonder why they don't do that one anymore.

TUBBY

Jesus, wire luffs? What size boat would that be on? What kind of speeds did you hit in that kind of wind?

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Chicken chute on my largish IOR ride in '81 was 2.2oz., wire luff and weighed enough that we needed to use a halyard and two guys on the pedestal grinder to get it on deck.  Blew it up on the way back from Molokai middle of the night.  That was fun!  Wire luffs come down easier when they are no longer attached to cloth.

Also blew up the blooper and bent the gooseneck that night.

 

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Did you win?

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"While we are on the subject on what sails are what. The Hot Yellow S2 kite, is that a PHRF or OD kite? Is there any difference in size between the two mains? "

 

   Yellow kite is PHRF, does not measure into OD sails.  No difference in size of Kevlar or Carbon main.  Kevlar main is flatter, and probably better for all around use, we went up in cloth weight to have sail last longer on the Kevy.  Both Carbon and Kevlar mains have heavy air and regular upper batten sets.  Boat is already tricked out.  Actually miss it quite a bit.

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1 hour ago, jackolantern said:

Which hobie is this? Any more pics?

The blue one, Myasasaur

IMG_E4852.JPG

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2 hours ago, hoofhearted said:

"While we are on the subject on what sails are what. The Hot Yellow S2 kite, is that a PHRF or OD kite? Is there any difference in size between the two mains? "

 

   Yellow kite is PHRF, does not measure into OD sails.  No difference in size of Kevlar or Carbon main.  Kevlar main is flatter, and probably better for all around use, we went up in cloth weight to have sail last longer on the Kevy.  Both Carbon and Kevlar mains have heavy air and regular upper batten sets.  Boat is already tricked out.  Actually miss it quite a bit.

Myasasaur is a great boat, can not blame you for missing it. We repainted the mast and boom and bought a reaching strut for it. We are in the process of repainting the interior as well, it looks amazing down below. Added a new radio, speakers, vhf, cabin lights, wireless instruments, new mast lights, replaced all the noodles as well. Took the outboard out for full servicing, and replaced the lifelines. Boat is going north and having high bunks fabricated so the boat can be single point lifted. Side note, who sprayed the Vc PE on the bottom?

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On 27/02/2018 at 2:33 PM, Mid said:

 jackolantern has is the answer  

Fixed it for ya.

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6 hours ago, PinkSpinnaker said:

Jesus, wire luffs? What size boat would that be on? What kind of speeds did you hit in that kind of wind?

Used wire luffed 2.2s on a number of boats from 40' IOR 1 toners up to a 65' pocket maxi.

The frightening thing was looking up at one in 40+ knowing that it wasn't going to blow up,  & that you would at some stage have to take it down with all of that bloody wire whipping around your ears.

TUBBY

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There was a twin-ply 2.2 80% chicken chute on Drum.  Yes, two layers of that stuff.  It was a right bastard of a sail to move around as it weighed 400 pounds plus.  Only used it once myself in a Transatlantic delivery - to dry it out and give it a bit of airing, as it was starting to stink - but the boys told me they used it several times in the 85-86 Whitbread and it was a bloody beast.  Boat went better with 2 reefs and a poled-out #2 jibtop.

As above, getting it down was no joy.

Apparently Eric Tabarly had a 4.5 oz Dacron 75% chicken chute on Pen Duick VI onthe 73 and 77 Whitbreads - wire luffs and all.  They blew it out.

 

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5 minutes ago, Oscar Whitbread said:

Fuck me, you'd need to fold those fuckers with an axe to get them back down below.

Yes, indeed. The clews and head were pretty much un-bendable with all the layers of reinforcement, so the sail went into a big modified jib bag.  The clew and head rings were 6" hoops made of welded 1/2" stainless steel bar, attached to the sail with loads of sewn webbing, just like a heavy jib clew ring.  On the Pen Duick VI Dacron one, apart from the 3/8" wire luffs there was a fourth ring in the middle of the sail, with 3/8" wires leading from head and both clews swaged into it.

When I sailed Pen Duick VI I saw that all the rings had  bent, especially the head one which had stretched out into an oval. There were patches everywhere.  It was blown out several times.

No snap shackles.  A big stainless screw shackle for the wire halyard.  Wire aft guys ended in a swaged thimble, and a 4-foot length of dead heavy jibsheet was used to connect the aft guy to the sail.  To trip, bring the pole forward and down, then hit the loop with an axe.  There were several on deck.  Same deal on Burton Cutter too.

They were hard boys.

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To answer your question if a chicken chute is a worthwhile investment on a Hobie 33, my answer would be no.   Your 75 oz. will be the faster sail 99.9% of the time.   When there is more wind than your .75 can handle a poled out #2 or #3 will be the fastest set up and will be less likely to break your boat.  Chicken chutes work well on heavier boats that do not get up and go like the H33.  If you are doing point to point races, a jib top is a sail that can be effectively used much more often, giving you a much better “speed” return on your sail investment.

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I've got a sissy chute on my Moore - I've used it a handful of times in 12 years, generally when it's blowing over 35 and each time I tell my crew to never put that sissy chute up again.  Then I forget and do it again.  Its a very nervous sail, both for the driver and its rattling self.

Get a A sail or code zero, I think you may wipe out less.

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Used an old heavy starcut for a chicken chute, which is a very flat cut with narrow shoulders.  As mentioned above, a flat chute really wants to reach and is not stable DDW.  I wasn't real impressed with it's DDW behavior.  

Depending on boat and target use, a heavy non-flat (round?) chute might be better than flat.

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23 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Yes, indeed. The clews and head were pretty much un-bendable with all the layers of reinforcement, so the sail went into a big modified jib bag.  The clew and head rings were 6" hoops made of welded 1/2" stainless steel bar, attached to the sail with loads of sewn webbing, just like a heavy jib clew ring.  On the Pen Duick VI Dacron one, apart from the 3/8" wire luffs there was a fourth ring in the middle of the sail, with 3/8" wires leading from head and both clews swaged into it.

When I sailed Pen Duick VI I saw that all the rings had  bent, especially the head one which had stretched out into an oval. There were patches everywhere.  It was blown out several times.

No snap shackles.  A big stainless screw shackle for the wire halyard.  Wire aft guys ended in a swaged thimble, and a 4-foot length of dead heavy jibsheet was used to connect the aft guy to the sail.  To trip, bring the pole forward and down, then hit the loop with an axe.  There were several on deck.  Same deal on Burton Cutter too.

They were hard boys.

Are we having fun yet?  :blink:

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5 hours ago, Ballard Sailor said:

I've got a sissy chute on my Moore - I've used it a handful of times in 12 years, generally when it's blowing over 35 and each time I tell my crew to never put that sissy chute up again.  Then I forget and do it again.  Its a very nervous sail, both for the driver and its rattling self.

Get a A sail or code zero, I think you may wipe out less.

We have an a5 for the moore that is wicked fast in 30 plus. It’s 85% the size of the class kite. 

We also have an s3 that is good over 30 plus as well - we made the switch to ayso kite after we had the s3. 

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On 3/1/2018 at 9:56 AM, P_Wop said:

As above, getting it down was no joy.

little birdy told me chas knew how ......................

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On 2/28/2018 at 9:18 AM, PinkSpinnaker said:

Jesus, wire luffs? What size boat would that be on? What kind of speeds did you hit in that kind of wind?

Standard for Hood's Crosscuts of the early 60's.... Boat came with 4 of them, 0.5, .75, 1.5 and 2.2 oz, with wire guys and luffs.

Couldn't tell which of the stains were rust and which were blood from the meat hooks. 

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On 01/03/2018 at 3:18 AM, PinkSpinnaker said:

Jesus, wire luffs? What size boat would that be on? What kind of speeds did you hit in that kind of wind?

Back when wire luffs were all the rage an 80 foot Maxi could hit speeds of up to 16 knots down a wave! Crazy fast. There was a great urban myth that one of the owners back in the day ( might have been Jim Kilroy or Sid fisher) tied a crew member to the mast with a very pistol and instructions to shoot the kite out if they started to broach. It's a good story anyway...

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Flat chutes are a problem. Even chicken chutes should NOT be flat. Rounder chutes are far more stable, and you really, really want stability when its hooting, especially if the waves are big.

If it goes to a sprit, all chutes should always go to the very end. The more wind, the more lift required!

So make it heavier that normal, reduce the shoulders, go fractional if that's an option. But it should still have a well rounded leading edge, and it should absolutely certainly be tacked as far forward as possible.

And the lesson we all learned with wire luffed spinnakers: just say no.

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3 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Back when wire luffs were all the rage an 80 foot Maxi could hit speeds of up to 16 knots down a wave! Crazy fast. There was a great urban myth that one of the owners back in the day ( might have been Jim Kilroy or Sid fisher) tied a crew member to the mast with a very pistol and instructions to shoot the kite out if they started to broach. It's a good story anyway...

I have done one "flare drop" on a 65' IOR boat in the day.  2.2oz kite, well beyond the top of what was clever for it, digging huge holes in the ocean, massive gybe broach and flog, and the damn wire halyard somehow skipped off the sheave and jammed itself in the masthead. 

Boom in the air on the preventer, mainsail fully backed, pole deep in the drink, deck near vertical. Only way out of it was to stuff a (white) parachute flare into the top of the kite.  Missed with the first one, but got it second try.

We just didn't know any better.

I lost a shoe.

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2 hours ago, carcrash said:

Flat chutes are a problem. Even chicken chutes should NOT be flat. Rounder chutes are far more stable, and you really, really want stability when its hooting, especially if the waves are big.

If it goes to a sprit, all chutes should always go to the very end. The more wind, the more lift required!

So make it heavier that normal, reduce the shoulders, go fractional if that's an option. But it should still have a well rounded leading edge, and it should absolutely certainly be tacked as far forward as possible.

And the lesson we all learned with wire luffed spinnakers: just say no.

You're dead right on the shape.  Super flat ones (like the old starcut) may have been smaller, but they flew around all over the place, and were essentially un-trimmable downwind.  with nasty results.  Something about 80% with some shape to it,and  with a narrow head was a load better.

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On 2/26/2018 at 8:53 PM, jackolantern said:

 

Looking for a heavy weather kite for the hobie? You should absolutely have one. Make sure it's cut pretty flat to let you more the bow around in waves and of a heavy enough material (1.5+ oz) that you won't feel bad flogging it when the inevitable happens. 

1.5oz? Flat? You've described a tent. 

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On 2/28/2018 at 7:28 PM, P_Wop said:

Yes, indeed. The clews and head were pretty much un-bendable with all the layers of reinforcement, so the sail went into a big modified jib bag.  The clew and head rings were 6" hoops made of welded 1/2" stainless steel bar, attached to the sail with loads of sewn webbing, just like a heavy jib clew ring.  On the Pen Duick VI Dacron one, apart from the 3/8" wire luffs there was a fourth ring in the middle of the sail, with 3/8" wires leading from head and both clews swaged into it.

When I sailed Pen Duick VI I saw that all the rings had  bent, especially the head one which had stretched out into an oval. There were patches everywhere.  It was blown out several times.

No snap shackles.  A big stainless screw shackle for the wire halyard.  Wire aft guys ended in a swaged thimble, and a 4-foot length of dead heavy jibsheet was used to connect the aft guy to the sail.  To trip, bring the pole forward and down, then hit the loop with an axe.  There were several on deck.  Same deal on Burton Cutter too.

They were hard boys.

What the fuck. 

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26 minutes ago, mustang__1 said:

What the fuck. 

Yes. Big heavy boats just went at hull speed and dug bigger holes.  So you put up some more stuff to see if you could break it out and get the beast surfing.  Walking on the wild side now.  White knuckle sailing.

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But will the young people today listen to us? Nooooo, noooooo.

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4 hours ago, LB 15 said:

But will the young people today listen to us? Nooooo, noooooo.

We used to fly our chutes upwind...in the snow...

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15 hours ago, P_Wop said:

We just didn't know any better.

I lost a shoe.

I always thought it was an easy thing to figure - when the play sailors are heading home because there's too much wind then putting up a chute is a really bad idea.

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On ‎2‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 5:12 PM, jeff carver said:

2.2 oz Hood flankers were the nuts 

Which is about the only thing they were good for..... or drop cloths.

If the OP has a Code Zero, that would do the trick.

Crossed the Atlantic years back in some breeze on a Pedrick 55, poled out 135% dacron genoa was the right call

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4 hours ago, BillDBastard said:

Which is about the only thing they were good for..... or drop cloths.

If the OP has a Code Zero, that would do the trick.

Crossed the Atlantic years back in some breeze on a Pedrick 55, poled out 135% dacron genoa was the right call

Absolutely right.

This is the famous Rick Tomlinson shot of Drum in the 85/86 Whitbread doing just that.   Two reefs in the main, and a poled out #2 jibtop.  Excellent rig for big heavy boats.

Thanks, Rick!

Rick-Tomlinson-Drum-1985-Whitbread-6.jpg

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Absolutely right.

This is the famous Rick Tomlinson shot of Drum in the 85/86 Whitbread doing just that.   Two reefs in the main, and a poled out #2 jibtop.  Excellent rig for big heavy boats.

Thanks, Rick!

Rick-Tomlinson-Drum-1985-Whitbread-6.jpg

Now that, is a winch farm.

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39 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

Now that, is a winch farm.

Only 17

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10 minutes ago, Rushman said:

Only 17

But it looks like they are ripe for harvesting.

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On 27/02/2018 at 10:12 PM, jeff carver said:

2.2 oz Hood flankers were the nuts 

Seen one that weight only a couple of times, it didn’t really end that well. :wacko::P

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21 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Yes. Big heavy boats just went at hull speed and dug bigger holes.  So you put up some more stuff to see if you could break it out and get the beast surfing.  Walking on the wild side now.  White knuckle sailing.

The part with the ax is what really got me. 

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22 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Yes. Big heavy boats just went at hull speed and dug bigger holes.  So you put up some more stuff to see if you could break it out and get the beast surfing.  Walking on the wild side now.  White knuckle sailing.

Thanks for the trip down memory lane. :P

Having wire flying around in the air and round the winches always sharpened up the reactions. 

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19 minutes ago, mustang__1 said:

The part with the ax is what really got me. 

We used a machete.

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1 hour ago, Rushman said:

Only 17

19. You forgot the traveler winches

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2 hours ago, P_Wop said:

19. You forgot the traveler winches

I did indeed... I didn't zoom in enough

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On 3/1/2018 at 3:28 AM, P_Wop said:

Yes, indeed. The clews and head were pretty much un-bendable with all the layers of reinforcement, so the sail went into a big modified jib bag.  The clew and head rings were 6" hoops made of welded 1/2" stainless steel bar, attached to the sail with loads of sewn webbing, just like a heavy jib clew ring.  On the Pen Duick VI Dacron one, apart from the 3/8" wire luffs there was a fourth ring in the middle of the sail, with 3/8" wires leading from head and both clews swaged into it.

When I sailed Pen Duick VI I saw that all the rings had  bent, especially the head one which had stretched out into an oval. There were patches everywhere.  It was blown out several times.

No snap shackles.  A big stainless screw shackle for the wire halyard.  Wire aft guys ended in a swaged thimble, and a 4-foot length of dead heavy jibsheet was used to connect the aft guy to the sail.  To trip, bring the pole forward and down, then hit the loop with an axe.  There were several on deck.  Same deal on Burton Cutter too.

They were hard boys.

Ahhh, a samurai takedown.

Did that once on a one tonner that the children (at heart) in the playpen overrode the halyard on the winch in a blow, on the second set after the first guy failed at the wire-line splice.   We were digging an even bigger hole in the water when the second guy blew in the same spot.   They had not gotten it all the way up and the splice was just ahead of the clutch.   I just touched the line with my rigging knife blade and I was enveloped in a cloud of puffy fibers for a microsecond, then the kite came down fast.   Luckily the crew I had handed the sheet off to had sheeted in enough that the kite was mostly behind the main kept it from dropping directly in front of the boat.   This was in florida when a front came through, with the initial breeze in the high 40s.   We saw four 2 tonner boats that were a couple miles upwind of us sequentially blow up their 3/4oz's giving us a heads up to shift to the 2.2 in time.

- Stumbling

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On 3/3/2018 at 4:24 PM, LB 15 said:

But will the young people today listen to us? Nooooo, noooooo.

The young'uns will never know true fear because it doesn't blow like it used to.

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On 3/4/2018 at 1:58 PM, mad said:

Thanks for the trip down memory lane. :P

Having wire flying around in the air and round the winches always sharpened up the reactions. 

The sound of flailing galvanised wire, a sort of low pitched demonic whistle, is something I don't miss in sailing. 

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Nor the "ting, ting" sound galvanized wire guys would make while being tensioned...don't miss that either

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SS Halyard hooks in the palm of your freezing hand was always something to look forward to. And running a knife up and down the wire to get rid of the cunts, with a freezing and bleeding hand was worse.

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9 hours ago, SPORTSCAR said:

The sound of flailing galvanised wire, a sort of low pitched demonic whistle, is something I don't miss in sailing. 

Ahhh,  but just the memory of the sound of a loaded wire heady sheet being eased on an 80' aluminium maxi still raises the hairs on the back of my neck.  The power in that noise was just awesome!

And no I don't miss being there half an hour early each week to meat hook the wire halyards with the back of a knife,  but my now 21 year old daughter complains every time she comes down to the CYCA that it just doesn't sound right without all the halyards clanking away like they used too.

TUBBY

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On 3/3/2018 at 4:08 AM, Grabbler said:

We used to fly our chutes upwind...in the snow...

 

On 3/2/2018 at 7:00 PM, P_Wop said:

I have done one "flare drop" on a 65' IOR boat in the day.  2.2oz kite, well beyond the top of what was clever for it, digging huge holes in the ocean, massive gybe broach and flog, and the damn wire halyard somehow skipped off the sheave and jammed itself in the masthead. 

Boom in the air on the preventer, mainsail fully backed, pole deep in the drink, deck near vertical. Only way out of it was to stuff a (white) parachute flare into the top of the kite.  Missed with the first one, but got it second try.

We just didn't know any better.

I lost a shoe.

Ah the days of uphill, in the snow, both ways, barefoot.

 

With all due respect, these guys really did things the hard way with what they had.

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On 3/4/2018 at 1:02 PM, stumblingthunder said:

a samurai takedown.

did you order the samurai douse?

god damn right i did

 

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9 hours ago, TUBBY said:

Ahhh,  but just the memory of the sound of a loaded wire heady sheet being eased on an 80' aluminium maxi still raises the hairs on the back of my neck.  The power in that noise was just awesome!

And no I don't miss being there half an hour early each week to meat hook the wire halyards with the back of a knife,  but my now 21 year old daughter complains every time she comes down to the CYCA that it just doesn't sound right without all the halyards clanking away like they used too.

TUBBY

Watching the top three turns open up when easing the guy/brace each time wasn’t my favourite pastime. 

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9 hours ago, TUBBY said:

Ahhh,  but just the memory of the sound of a loaded wire heady sheet being eased on an 80' aluminium maxi still raises the hairs on the back of my neck.  The power in that noise was just awesome!

And no I don't miss being there half an hour earl